• The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • We present an analytic model to estimate the capabilities of space missions dedicated to the search for biosignatures in the atmosphere of rocky planets located in the habitable zone of nearby stars. Relations between performance and mission parameters such as mirror diameter, distance to targets, and radius of planets, are obtained. Two types of instruments are considered: coronagraphs observing in the visible, and nulling interferometers in the thermal infrared. Missions considered are: single-pupil coronagraphs with a 2.4 m primary mirror, and formation flying interferometers with 4 x 0.75 m collecting mirrors. The numbers of accessible planets are calculated as a function of {\eta}earth. When Kepler gives its final estimation for {\eta}earth, the model will permit a precise assessment of the potential of each instrument. Based on current estimations, {\eta}earth = 10% around FGK stars and 50% around M stars, the coronagraph could study in spectroscopy only ~1.5 relevant planets, and the interferometer ~14.0. These numbers are obtained under the major hypothesis that the exozodiacal light around the target stars is low enough for each instrument. In both cases, a prior detection of planets is assumed and a target list established. For the long-term future, building both types of spectroscopic instruments, and using them on the same targets, will be the optimal solution because they provide complementary information. But as a first affordable space mission, the interferometer looks the more promising in term of biosignature harvest.
  • Context : The properties of the inner disks of bright Herbig AeBe stars have been studied with near infrared (NIR) interferometry and high resolution spectroscopy. The continuum and a few molecular gas species have been studied close to the central star; however, sensitivity problems limit direct information about the inner disks of the fainter T Tauri stars. Aims : Our aim is to measure some of the properties of the inner regions of disks surrounding southern T Tauri stars. Methods : We performed a survey with the PIONIER recombiner instrument at H-band of 21 T Tauri stars. The baselines used ranged from 11 m to 129 m, corresponding to a maximum resolution of 3mas (0.45 au at 150 pc). Results : Thirteen disks are resolved well and the visibility curves are fully sampled as a function of baseline in the range 45-130 m for these 13 objects. A simple qualitative examination of visibility profiles allows us to identify a rapid drop-off in the visibilities at short baselines in 8 resolved disks. This is indicative of a significant contribution from an extended contribution of light from the disk. We demonstrate that this component is compatible with scattered light, providing strong support to a prediction made by Pinte et al. (2008). The amplitude of the drop-off and the amount of dust thermal emission changes from source to source suggesting that each disk is different. A by-product of the survey is the identification of a new milli-arcsec separation binary: WW Cha. Spectroscopic and interferometric data of AK Sco have also been fitted with a binary and disk model. Conclusions : Visibility data are reproduced well when thermal emission and scattering form dust are fully considered. The inner radii measured are consistent with the expected dust sublimation radii. Modelling of AK Sco suggests a likely coplanarity between the disk and the binary's orbital plane
  • (Abridged) Circumstellar disks are believed to be the birthplace of planets and are expected to dissipate on a timescale of a few Myr. The processes responsible for the removal of the dust and gas will strongly modify the radial distribution of the dust and consequently the SED. In particular, a young planet will open a gap, resulting in an inner disk dominating the near-IR emission and an outer disk emitting mostly in the far-IR. We analyze a full set of data (including VLTI/Pionier, VLTI/Midi, and VLT/NaCo/Sam) to constrain the structure of the transition disk around TCha. We used the Mcfost radiative transfer code to simultaneously model the SED and the interferometric observations. We find that the dust responsible for the emission in excess in the near-IR must have a narrow temperature distribution with a maximum close to the silicate sublimation temperature. This translates into a narrow inner dusty disk (0.07-0.11 AU). We find that the outer disk starts at about 12 AU and is partially resolved by the Pionier, Sam, and Midi instruments. We show that the Sam closure phases, interpreted as the signature of a candidate companion, may actually trace the asymmetry generated by forward scattering by dust grains in the upper layers of the outer disk. These observations help constrain the inclination and position angle of the outer disk. The presence of matter inside the gap is difficult to assess with present-day observations. Our model suggests the outer disk contaminates the interferometric signature of any potential companion that could be responsible for the gap opening, and such a companion still has to be unambiguously detected. We stress the difficulty to observe point sources in bright massive disks, and the consequent need to account for disk asymmetries (e.g. anisotropic scattering) in model-dependent search for companions.
  • In the course of our VLTI young stellar object PIONIER imaging program, we have identified a strong visibility chromatic dependency that appeared in certain sources. This effect, rising value of visibilities with decreasing wavelengths over one base, is also present in previous published and archival AMBER data. For Herbig AeBe stars, the H band is generally located at the transition between the star and the disk predominance in flux for Herbig AeBe stars. We believe that this phenomenon is responsible for the visibility rise effect. We present a method to correct the visibilities from this effect in order to allow "gray" image reconstruction software, like Mira, to be used. In parallel we probe the interest of carrying an image reconstruction in each spectral channel and then combine them to obtain the final broadband one. As an illustration we apply these imaging methods to MWC158, a (possibly Herbig) B[e] star intensively observed with PIONIER. Finally, we compare our result with a parametric model fitted onto the data.
  • The NEAT (Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope) mission is a proposal submitted to ESA for its 2010 call for M-size mission within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 plan. The main scientific goal of the NEAT mission is to detect and characterize planetary systems in an exhaustive way down to 1 Earth mass in the habitable zone and further away, around nearby stars for F, G, and K spectral types. This survey would provide the actual planetary masses, the full characterization of the orbits including their inclination, for all the components of the planetary system down to that mass limit. NEAT will continue the work performed by Hipparcos and Gaia by reaching a precision that is improved by two orders of magnitude on pointed targets.
  • We present a review of the interplay between the evolution of circumstellar disks and the formation of planets, both from the perspective of theoretical models and dedicated observations. Based on this, we identify and discuss fundamental questions concerning the formation and evolution of circumstellar disks and planets which can be addressed in the near future with optical and infrared long-baseline interferometers. Furthermore, the importance of complementary observations with long-baseline (sub)millimeter interferometers and high-sensitivity infrared observatories is outlined.
  • (abridged) A complete census of planetary systems around a volume-limited sample of solar-type stars (FGK dwarfs) in the Solar neighborhood with uniform sensitivity down to Earth-mass planets within their Habitable Zones out to several AUs would be a major milestone in extrasolar planets astrophysics. This fundamental goal can be achieved with a mission concept such as NEAT - the Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope. NEAT is designed to carry out space-borne extremely-high-precision astrometric measurements sufficient to detect dynamical effects due to orbiting planets of mass even lower than Earth's around the nearest stars. Such a survey mission would provide the actual planetary masses and the full orbital geometry for all the components of the detected planetary systems down to the Earth-mass limit. The NEAT performance limits can be achieved by carrying out differential astrometry between the targets and a set of suitable reference stars in the field. The NEAT instrument design consists of an off-axis parabola single-mirror telescope, a detector with a large field of view made of small movable CCDs located around a fixed central CCD, and an interferometric calibration system originating from metrology fibers located at the primary mirror. The proposed mission architecture relies on the use of two satellites operating at L2 for 5 years, flying in formation and offering a capability of more than 20,000 reconfigurations (alternative option uses deployable boom). The NEAT primary science program will encompass an astrometric survey of our 200 closest F-, G- and K-type stellar neighbors, with an average of 50 visits. The remaining time might be allocated to improve the characterization of the architecture of selected planetary systems around nearby targets of specific interest (low-mass stars, young stars, etc.) discovered by Gaia, ground-based high-precision radial-velocity surveys.
  • With the advent of infrared long-baseline interferometers with more than two telescopes, both the size and the completeness of interferometric data sets have significantly increased, allowing images based on models with no a priori assumptions to be reconstructed. Our main objective is to analyze the multiple parameters of the image reconstruction process with particular attention to the regularization term and the study of their behavior in different situations. The secondary goal is to derive practical rules for the users. Using the Multi-aperture image Reconstruction Algorithm (MiRA), we performed multiple systematic tests, analyzing 11 regularization terms commonly used. The tests are made on different astrophysical objects, different (u,v) plane coverages and several signal-to-noise ratios to determine the minimal configuration needed to reconstruct an image. We establish a methodology and we introduce the mean-square errors (MSE) to discuss the results. From the ~24000 simulations performed for the benchmarking of image reconstruction with MiRA, we are able to classify the different regularizations in the context of the observations. We find typical values of the regularization weight. A minimal (u,v) coverage is required to reconstruct an acceptable image, whereas no limits are found for the studied values of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also show that super-resolution can be achieved with increasing performance with the (u,v) coverage filling. Using image reconstruction with a sufficient (u,v) coverage is shown to be reliable. The choice of the main parameters of the reconstruction is tightly constrained. We recommend that efforts to develop interferometric infrastructures should first concentrate on the number of telescopes to combine, and secondly on improving the accuracy and sensitivity of the arrays.
  • In a few years, the second generation instruments of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) will routinely provide observations with 4 to 6 telescopes simultaneously. To reach their ultimate performance, they will need a fringe sensor capable to measure in real time the randomly varying optical paths differences. A collaboration between LAOG (PI institute), IAGL, OCA and GIPSA-Lab has proposed the Planar Optics Phase Sensor concept to ESO for the 2nd Generation Fringe Tracker. This concept is based on the integrated optics technologies, enabling the conception of extremely compact interferometric instruments naturally providing single-mode spatial filtering. It allows operations with 4 and 6 telescopes by measuring the fringes position thanks to a spectrally dispersed ABCD method. We present here the main analysis which led to the current concept as well as the expected on-sky performance and the proposed design.
  • The Z CMa binary is understood to undergo both FU Orionis (FUOR) and EX Orionis (EXOR) type outbursts. While the SE component has been spectro- scopically identified as an FUOR, the NW component, a Herbig Be star, is the source of the EXOR outbursts. The system has been identified as the source of a large outflow, however, previous studies have failed to identify the driver. Here we present adaptive optics (AO) assisted [FeII] spectro-images which reveal for the first time the presence of two jets. Observations made using OSIRIS at the Keck Observatory show the Herbig Be star to be the source of the parsec-scale outflow, which within 2'' of the source shows signs of wiggling and the FUOR to '' be driving a ~ 0.4 jet. The wiggling of the Herbig Be star's jet is evidence for an additional companion which could in fact be generating the EXOR outbursts, the last of which began in 2008 (Grankin & Artemenko 2009). Indeed the dy- namical scale of the wiggling corresponds to a time-scale of 4-8 years which is in agreement with the time-scale of these outbursts. The spectro-images also show a bow-shock shaped feature and possible associated knots. The origin of this structure is as of yet unclear. Finally interesting low velocity structure is also observed. One possibility is that it originates in a wide-angle outflow launched from a circumbinary disk.
  • Z CMa is a young binary system consisting of an Herbig primary and a FU Ori companion. Both components seem to be surrounded by active accretion disks and a jet was associated to the Herbig B0. In Nov. 2008, K. Grankin discovered that Z CMa was exhibiting an outburst with an amplitude larger than any photometric variations recorded in the last 25 years. To study the innermost regions in which the outburst occurs and understand its origin, we have observed both binary components with AMBER/VLTI across the Br{\gamma} emission line in Dec. 2009 in medium and high spectral resolution modes. Our observations show that the Herbig Be, responsible for the increase of luminosity, also produces a strong Br{\gamma} emission, and they allow us to disentangle from various origins by locating the emission at each velocities through the line. Considering a model of a Keplerian disk alone fails at reproducing the asymmetric spectro-astrometric measurements, suggesting a major contribution from an outflow.
  • Optical long baseline interferometry is a technique that has generated almost 850 refereed papers to date. The targets span a large variety of objects from planetary systems to extragalactic studies and all branches of stellar physics. We have created a database hosted by the JMMC and connected to the Optical Long Baseline Interferometry Newsletter (OLBIN) web site using MySQL and a collection of XML or PHP scripts in order to store and classify these publications. Each entry is defined by its ADS bibcode, includes basic ADS informations and metadata. The metadata are specified by tags sorted in categories: interferometric facilities, instrumentation, wavelength of operation, spectral resolution, type of measurement, target type, and paper category, for example. The whole OLBIN publication list has been processed and we present how the database is organized and can be accessed. We use this tool to generate statistical plots of interest for the community in optical long baseline interferometry.
  • We present the third release of the AMBER data reduction software by the JMMC. This software is based on core algorithms optimized after several years of operation. An optional graphic interface in a high level language allows the user to control the process step by step or in a completely automatic manner. Ongoing improvement is the implementation of a robust calibration scheme, making use of the full calibration sets available during the night. The output products are standard OI-FITS files, which can be used directly in high level software like model fitting or image reconstruction tools. The software performances are illustrated on a full data set of calibrators observed with AMBER during 5 years taken in various instrumental setup.
  • We present here a new observational technique, Phase Closure Nulling (PCN), which has the potential to obtain very high contrast detection and spectroscopy of faint companions to bright stars. PCN consists in measuring closure phases of fully resolved objects with a baseline triplet where one of the baselines crosses a null of the object visibility function. For scenes dominated by the presence of a stellar disk, the correlated flux of the star around nulls is essentially canceled out, and in these regions the signature of fainter, unresolved, scene object(s) dominates the imaginary part of the visibility in particular the closure phase. We present here the basics of the PCN method, the initial proof-of-concept observation, the envisioned science cases and report about the first observing campaign made on VLTI/AMBER and CHARA/MIRC using this technique.
  • We present the results of the fourth Optical/IR Interferometry Imaging Beauty Contest. The contest consists of blind imaging of test data sets derived from model sources and distributed in the OI-FITS format. The test data consists of spectral data sets on an object "observed" in the infrared with spectral resolution. There were 4 different algorithms competing this time: BSMEM the Bispectrum Maximum Entropy Method by Young, Baron & Buscher; RPR the Recursive Phase Reconstruction by Rengaswamy; SQUEEZE a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm by Baron, Monnier & Kloppenborg; and, WISARD the Weak-phase Interferometric Sample Alternating Reconstruction Device by Vannier & Mugnier. The contest model image, the data delivered to the contestants and the rules are described as well as the results of the image reconstruction obtained by each method. These results are discussed as well as the strengths and limitations of each algorithm.
  • Long-baseline interferometry at infrared wavelengths allows the innermost regions around young stars to be observed. These observations directly probe the location of the dust and gas in the disks. The characteristic sizes of these regions found are larger than previously thought. These results have motivated in part a new class of models of the inner disk structure, but the precise understanding of the origin of these low visibilities is still in debate. Mid-infrared observations probe disk emission over a larger range of scales revealing mineralogy gradients in the disk. Recent spectrally resolved observations allow the dust and gas to be studied separately showing that the Brackett gamma emission can find its origin either in a wind or in a magnetosphere and that there is probably no correlation between the location of the Brackett gamma emission and accretion. In a certain number of cases, the very high spatial resolution reveals very close companions and can determine their masses. Overall, these results provide essential information on the structure and the physical properties of close regions surrounding young stars especially where planet formation is suspected to occur.
  • Despite the revolution in our knowledge resulting from the detection of planets around mature stars, we know almost nothing about planets orbiting young stars because rapid rotation and active photospheres preclude detection by radial velocities or transits and because direct imaging has barely penetrated the requisite range of high contrast and angular resolution. Of the techniques presently under consideration for the coming decade, only space-based astrometry offers the prospect of discovering gas giants (100 to >> 300 Mearth), lower mass systems such as icy giants (10 to 100 Mearth), and even a few rocky, super-Earths 300 Mearth) orbiting stars ranging in age from 1 to 100 Myr. Astrometry will complement high contrast imaging which should be able to detect gas giants (1~10 MJup) in orbits from a few to a few hundred AU. An astrometric survey in combination with imaging data for a subsample of objects will allow a detailed physical understanding of the formation and evolution of young gas giant planets impossible to achieve by any one technique.
  • The following exercises aim to learn the link between the object intensity distribution and the corresponding visibility curves of a long-baseline ptical interferometer. They are also intended to show the additional constraints on observability that an interferometer has. This practical session is meant to be carried out with the ASPRO software, from the Jean-Marie Mariotti Center, but can also be done using other observation preparation software, such as viscalc from ESO. There are two main parts with series of exercises and the exercises corrections. The first one aims at understanding the visibility and its properties by practicing with simple examples, and the second one is about UV coverage.
  • I review the results obtained by long-baseline interferometry at infrared wavelengths on the innermost regions around young stars. These observations directly probe the location of the dust and gas in the disks. The characteristic sizes of these regions found are larger than previously thought. These results have motivated in part a new class of models of the inner disk structure. However the precise understanding of the origin of these low visibilities is still in debate. Mid-infrared observations have probed disk emission over a larger range of scales revealing mineralogy gradients in the disk. Recent spectrally resolved observations allow the dust and gas to be studied separately. The few results shows that the Brackett gamma emission can find its origin either in a wind or in a magnetosphere but there are no definitive answers yet. In a certain number of cases, the very high spatial resolution seems to reveal very close companions. In any case, these results provide crucial information on the structure and physical properties of disks surrounding young stars especially as initial conditions for planet formation.
  • VLTi Spectro-Imager (VSI) is a proposition for a second generation VLTI instrument which is aimed at providing the ESO community with the capability of performing image synthesis at milli-arcsecond angular resolution. VSI provides the VLTI with an instrument able to combine 4 telescopes in a baseline version and optionally up to 6 telescopes in the near-infrared spectral domain with moderate to high spectral resolution. The instrument contains its own fringe tracker in order to relax the constraints onto the VLTI infrastructure. VSI will do imaging at the milli-arcsecond scale with spectral resolution of: a) the close environments of young stars probing the initial conditions for planet formation; b) the surfaces of stars; c) the environment of evolved stars, stellar remnants and stellar winds, and d) the central region of active galactic nuclei and supermassive black holes. The science cases allowed us to specify the astrophysical requirements of the instrument and to define the necessary studies of the science group for phase A.
  • The AMBER instrument installed at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) combines three beams from as many telescopes to produce spectrally dispersed fringes from milli-arcsecond angular scale in the near infrared. Two years after installation, first scientific observations have been carried out during the Science Demonstration Time and the Guaranteed Time mostly on bright sources due to some VLTI limitations. In this paper, we review these first astrophysical results and we show which types of completely new information is brought by AMBER. The first astrophysical results have been mainly focusing on stellar wind structure, kinematics, and its interaction with dust usually concentrated in a disk. Because AMBER has dramatically increased the number of measures per baseline, this instrument brings strong constraints on morphology and models despite a relatively poor (u, v) coverage for each object.
  • Aims. We aim to study the geometry and kinematics of the disk around the Be star $\alpha$ Arae as a function of wavelength, especially across the Br$\gamma$ emission line. The main purpose of this paper is to answer the question about the nature of the disk rotation around Be stars. Methods. We use the VLTI/AMBER instrument operating in the K band which provides a gain by a factor 5 in spatial resolution compared to previous VLTI/MIDI observations. Moreover, it is possible to combine the high angular resolution provided with the (medium) spectral resolution of AMBER to study the kinematics of the inner part of the disk and to infer its rotation law. Results. We obtain for the first time the direct evidence that the disk is in keplerian rotation, answering a question that occurs since the discovery of the first Be star $\gamma$ Cas by father Secchi in 1866. We also present the global geometry of the disk showing that it is compatible with a thin disk + polar enhanced winds modeled with the SIMECA code. We found that the disk around $\alpha$ Arae is compatible with a dense equatorial matter confined in the central region whereas a polar wind is contributing along the rotational axis of the central star. Between these two regions the density must be low enough to reproduce the large visibility modulus (small extension) obtained for two of the four VLTI baselines. Moreover, we obtain that $\alpha$ Arae is rotating very close to its critical rotation. This scenario is also compatible with the previous MIDI measurements.
  • We review recent advances in our understanding of the innermost regions of the circumstellar environment around young stars, made possible by the technique of long baseline interferometry at infrared wavelengths. Near-infrared observations directly probe the location of the hottest dust. The characteristic sizes found are much larger than previously thought, and strongly correlate with the luminosity of the central young stars. This relation has motivated in part a new class of models of the inner disk structure. The first mid-infrared observations have probed disk emission over a larger range of scales, and spectrally resolved interferometry has for the first time revealed mineralogy gradients in the disk. These new measurements provide crucial information on the structure and physical properties of young circumstellar disks, as initial conditions for planet formation.
  • Our objective is to prove that integrated optics (IO) is not only a good concept for astronomical interferometry but also a working technique with high performance. We used the commissioning data obtained with the dedicated K-band integrated optics two-telescope beam combiner which now replaces the fiber coupler MONA in the VLTI/VINCI instrument. We characterize the behaviour of this IO device and compare its properties to other single mode beam combiner like the previously used MONA fiber coupler. The IO combiner provides a high optical throughput, a contrast of 89% with a night-to-night stability of a few percent. Even if a dispersive phase is present, we show that it does not bias the measured Fourier visibility estimate. An upper limit of 0.005 for the cross-talk between linear polarization states has been measured. We take advantage of the intrinsic contrast stability to test a new astronomical prodecure for calibrating diameters of simple stars by simultaneously fitting the instrumental contrast and the apparent stellar diameters. This method reaches an accuracy with diameter errors of the order of previous ones but without the need of an already known calibrator. These results are an important step of integrated optics and paves the road to incoming imaging interferometer projects.