• Event structures are a widely accepted model of concurrency. In a seminal paper by Nielsen, Plotkin and Winskel, they are used to establish a bridge between the theory of domains and the approach to concurrency proposed by Petri. A basic role is played by an unfolding construction that maps (safe) Petri nets into a subclass of event structures where each event has a uniquely determined set of causes, called prime event structures, which in turn can be identified with their domain of configurations. At a categorical level, this is nicely formalised by Winskel as a chain of coreflections. Contrary to prime event structures, general event structures allow for the presence of disjunctive causes, i.e., events can be enabled by distinct minimal sets of events. In this paper, we extend the connection between Petri nets and event structures in order to include disjunctive causes. In particular, we show that, at the level of nets, disjunctive causes are well accounted for by persistent places. These are places where tokens, once generated, can be used several times without being consumed and where multiple tokens are interpreted collectively, i.e., their histories are inessential. Generalising the work on ordinary nets, Petri nets with persistence are related to a new class of event structures, called locally connected, by means of a chain of coreflection relying on an unfolding construction.
  • Stable event structures, and their duality with prime algebraic domains (arising as partial orders of configurations), are a landmark of concurrency theory, providing a clear characterisation of causality in computations. They have been used for defining a concurrent semantics of several formalisms, from Petri nets to linear graph rewriting systems, which in turn lay at the basis of many visual frameworks. Stability however is restrictive for dealing with formalisms where a computational step can merge parts of the state, like graph rewriting systems with non-linear rules, which are needed to cover some relevant applications (such as the graphical encoding of calculi with name passing). We characterise, as a natural generalisation of prime algebraic domains, a class of domains that is well-suited to model the semantics of formalisms with fusions. We then identify a corresponding class of event structures, that we call connected event structures, via a duality result formalised as an equivalence of categories. Connected event structures are exactly the class of event structures the arise as the semantics of non-linear graph rewriting systems. Interestingly, the category of general unstable event structures coreflects into our category of domains, so that our result provides a characterisation of the partial orders of configurations of such event structures.
  • String diagrams are a powerful and intuitive graphical syntax for terms of symmetric monoidal categories (SMCs). They find many applications in computer science and are becoming increasingly relevant in other fields such as physics and control theory. An important role in many such approaches is played by equational theories of diagrams, typically oriented and applied as rewrite rules. This paper lays a comprehensive foundation of this form of rewriting. We interpret diagrams combinatorially as typed hypergraphs and establish the precise correspondence between diagram rewriting modulo the laws of SMCs on the one hand and double pushout (DPO) rewriting of hypergraphs, subject to a soundness condition called convexity, on the other. This result rests on a more general characterisation theorem in which we show that typed hypergraph DPO rewriting amounts to diagram rewriting modulo the laws of SMCs with a chosen special Frobenius structure. We illustrate our approach with a proof of termination for the theory of non-commutative bimonoids.