• We present the first data release (DR1) of the SkyMapper Southern Survey, a hemispheric survey carried out with the SkyMapper Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory in Australia. Here, we present the survey strategy, data processing, catalogue construction and database schema. The DR1 dataset includes over 66,000 images from the Shallow Survey component, covering an area of 17,200 deg$^2$ in all six SkyMapper passbands $uvgriz$, while the full area covered by any passband exceeds 20,000 deg$^2$. The catalogues contain over 285 million unique astrophysical objects, complete to roughly 18 mag in all bands. We compare our $griz$ point-source photometry with PanSTARRS1 DR1 and note an RMS scatter of 2%. The internal reproducibility of SkyMapper photometry is on the order of 1%. Astrometric precision is better than 0.2 arcsec based on comparison with Gaia DR1. We describe the end-user database, through which data are presented to the world community, and provide some illustrative science queries.
  • We present photometry, spectra, and spectropolarimetry of supernova (SN) 2012ab, mostly obtained over the course of $\sim 300$ days after discovery. SN 2012ab was a Type IIn (SN IIn) event discovered near the nucleus of spiral galaxy 2MASXJ12224762+0536247. While its light curve resembles that of SN 1998S, its spectral evolution does not. We see indications of CSM interaction in the strong intermediate-width emission features, the high luminosity (peak at absolute magnitude $M=-19.5$), and the lack of broad absorption features in the spectrum. The H$\alpha$ emission undergoes a peculiar transition. At early times it shows a broad blue emission wing out to $-14{,}000$ km $\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ and a truncated red wing. Then at late times ($>$ 100$\,$days) it shows a truncated blue wing and a very broad red emission wing out to roughly $+20{,}000$ km $\mathrm{s^{-1}}$. This late-time broad red wing probably arises in the reverse shock. Spectra also show an asymmetric intermediate-width H$\alpha$ component with stronger emission on the red side at late times. The evolution of the asymmetric profiles requires a density structure in the distant CSM that is highly aspherical. Our spectropolarimetric data also suggest asphericity with a strong continuum polarization of $\sim 1-3$% and depolarization in the H$\alpha$ line, indicating asphericity in the CSM at a level comparable to that in other SNe IIn. We estimate a mass-loss rate of $\dot{M} = 0.050\, {\rm M}_{\odot}\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ for $v_{\rm pre} = 100$$\,$km$\,$$\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ extending back at least 75$\,$yr prior to the SN. The strong departure from axisymmetry in the CSM of SN 2012ab may suggest that the progenitor was an eccentric binary system undergoing eruptive mass loss.
  • Current synoptic sky surveys monitor large areas of the sky to find variable and transient astronomical sources. As the number of detections per night at a single telescope easily exceeds several thousand, current detection pipelines make intensive use of machine learning algorithms to classify the detected objects and to filter out the most interesting candidates. A number of upcoming surveys will produce up to three orders of magnitude more data, which renders high-precision classification systems essential to reduce the manual and, hence, expensive vetting by human experts. We present an approach based on convolutional neural networks to discriminate between true astrophysical sources and artefacts in reference-subtracted optical images. We show that relatively simple networks are already competitive with state-of-the-art systems and that their quality can further be improved via slightly deeper networks and additional preprocessing steps -- eventually yielding models outperforming state-of-the-art systems. In particular, our best model correctly classifies about 97.3% of all 'real' and 99.7% of all 'bogus' instances on a test set containing 1,942 'bogus' and 227 'real' instances in total. Furthermore, the networks considered in this work can also successfully classify these objects at hand without relying on difference images, which might pave the way for future detection pipelines not containing image subtraction steps at all.
  • The SkyMapper 1.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory has now begun regular operations. Alongside the Southern Sky Survey, a comprehensive digital survey of the entire southern sky, SkyMapper will carry out a search for supernovae and other transients. The search strategy, covering a total footprint area of ~2000 deg2 with a cadence of $\leq 5$ days, is optimised for discovery and follow-up of low-redshift type Ia supernovae to constrain cosmic expansion and peculiar velocities. We describe the search operations and infrastructure, including a parallelised software pipeline to discover variable objects in difference imaging; simulations of the performance of the survey over its lifetime; public access to discovered transients; and some first results from the Science Verification data.
  • We present a search for transient and highly variable sources at low radio frequencies (150-200 MHz) that explores long timescales of 1-3 years. We conducted this search by comparing the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey Alternative Data Release 1 (TGSS ADR1) and the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey catalogues. To account for the different completeness thresholds in the individual surveys, we searched for compact GLEAM sources above a flux density limit of 100 mJy that were not present in the TGSS ADR1; and also for compact TGSS ADR1 sources above a flux density limit of 200 mJy that had no counterpart in GLEAM. From a total sample of 234 333 GLEAM sources and 275 612 TGSS ADR1 sources in the overlap region between the two surveys, there were 99658 GLEAM sources and 38 978 TGSS ADR sources that passed our flux density cutoff and compactness criteria. Analysis of these sources resulted in three candidate transient sources. Further analysis ruled out two candidates as imaging artefacts. We analyse the third candidate and show it is likely to be real, with a flux density of 182 +/- 26 mJy at 147.5 MHz. This gives a transient surface density of rho = (6.2 +/- 6) x 10-5 deg-2 . We present initial follow-up observations and discuss possible causes for this candidate. The small number of spurious sources from this search demonstrates the high reliability of these two new low-frequency radio catalogues.
  • This paper presents the first major data release and survey description for the ANU WiFeS SuperNovA Program (AWSNAP). AWSNAP is an ongoing supernova spectroscopy campaign utilising the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the Australian National University (ANU) 2.3m telescope. The first and primary data release of this program (AWSNAP-DR1) releases 357 spectra of 175 unique objects collected over 82 equivalent full nights of observing from July 2012 to August 2015. These spectra have been made publicly available via the WISeREP supernova spectroscopy repository. We analyse the AWSNAP sample of Type Ia supernova spectra, including measurements of narrow sodium absorption features afforded by the high spectral resolution of the WiFeS instrument. In some cases we were able to use the integral-field nature of the WiFeS instrument to measure the rotation velocity of the SN host galaxy near the SN location in order to obtain precision sodium absorption velocities. We also present an extensive time series of SN 2012dn, including a near-nebular spectrum which both confirms its "super-Chandrasekhar" status and enables measurement of the sub-solar host metallicity at the SN site.
  • Host galaxy identification is a crucial step for modern supernova (SN) surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will discover SNe by the thousands. Spectroscopic resources are limited, so in the absence of real-time SN spectra these surveys must rely on host galaxy spectra to obtain accurate redshifts for the Hubble diagram and to improve photometric classification of SNe. In addition, SN luminosities are known to correlate with host-galaxy properties. Therefore, reliable identification of host galaxies is essential for cosmology and SN science. We simulate SN events and their locations within their host galaxies to develop and test methods for matching SNe to their hosts. We use both real and simulated galaxy catalog data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog and MICECATv2.0, respectively. We also incorporate "hostless" SNe residing in undetected faint hosts into our analysis, with an assumed hostless rate of 5%. Our fully automated algorithm is run on catalog data and matches SNe to their hosts with 91% accuracy. We find that including a machine learning component, run after the initial matching algorithm, improves the accuracy (purity) of the matching to 97% with a 2% cost in efficiency (true positive rate). Although the exact results are dependent on the details of the survey and the galaxy catalogs used, the method of identifying host galaxies we outline here can be applied to any transient survey.
  • We present the discovery of a z=0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad FeII (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explained by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. The age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013ej, in galaxy M74, from 1 to 450 days after the explosion. SN 2013ej is a hydrogen-rich supernova, classified as a Type IIL due to its relatively fast decline following the initial peak. It has a relatively high peak luminosity (absolute magnitude M$_\rm{V}$ = -17.6) but a small $^{56}$Ni production of ~0.023 M$_\odot$. Its photospheric evolution is similar to other Type II SNe, with shallow absorption in the H{\alpha} profile typical for a Type IIL. During transition to the radioactive decay tail at ~100 days, we find the SN to grow bluer in B - V colour, in contrast to some other Type II supernovae. At late times, the bolometric light curve declined faster than expected from $^{56}$Co decay and we observed unusually broad and asymmetric nebular emission lines. Based on comparison of nebular emission lines most sensitive to the progenitor core mass, we find our observations are best matched to synthesized spectral models with a M$_\rm{ZAMS}$ = 12 - 15 M$_\odot$ progenitor. The derived mass range is similar to but not higher than the mass estimated for Type IIP progenitors. This is against the idea that Type IIL are from more massive stars. Observations are consistent with the SN having a progenitor with a relatively low-mass envelope.
  • This letter studies the limited feedback cognitive radio system, where the primary users (PU) are interfered by the secondary transmitter (ST) due to the imperfect beamforming. We propose to allocate the feedback bits among multiple PUs to minimize the maximum interference caused by the ST, by exploiting the heterogeneous average channel gains. In addition, we study the problem of minimizing the total feedback bits under a predefined interference threshold at the PUs. The solutions with low complexity are proposed for the studied problems, and the performances of bit allocations are analyzed. Simulation results validate our analysis and demonstrate that the proposed solutions work very well in terms of minimizing the maximum interference caused by the ST and minimizing the total feedback bits under predefined interference threshold at the PUs for limited feedback CR system.
  • The first observations by a worldwide network of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors offer a unique opportunity for the astronomical community. At design sensitivity, these facilities will be able to detect coalescing binary neutron stars to distances approaching 400 Mpc, and neutron star-black hole systems to 1 Gpc. Both of these sources are associated with gamma ray bursts which are known to emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Gravitational wave detections provide the opportunity for "multi-messenger" observations, combining gravitational wave with electromagnetic, cosmic ray or neutrino observations. This review provides an overview of how Australian astronomical facilities and collaborations with the gravitational wave community can contribute to this new era of discovery, via contemporaneous follow-up observations from the radio to the optical and high energy. We discuss some of the frontier discoveries that will be made possible when this new window to the Universe is opened.
  • Filter bank multi-carrier with offset quadrature amplitude modulation (FBMC/OQAM) has been heavily studied as an alternative waveform for 5G systems. Its advantages of higher spectrum efficiency, localized frequency response and insensitivity to synchronization errors may enable promising performance when orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) fails. However, performing channel estimation under the intrinsic interference has been a fundamental obstacle towards adopting FBMC/OQMA in a practical system. Several schemes are available but the performance is far from satisfaction. In this paper, we will show the existing methods are trapped by the paradigm that a clean pilot is mandatory so as to explicitly carry a reference symbol to the receiver for the purpose of channel estimation. By breaking this paradigm, a novel dual dependent pilot scheme is proposed, which gives up the independent pilot and derives dual pilots from the imposed interference. By doing this, the interference between pilots can be fully utilized. Consequentially, the new scheme significantly outperforms existing solutions and the simulation results show FBMC/OQAM can achieve close-to-OFDM performance in a practical system even with the presence of strong intrinsic interference.
  • This correspondence proposes a new rotated codebook for three-dimensional (3D) multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) system under spatially correlated channel. To avoid the problem of high dimensionality led by large antenna array, the rotation matrix in the rotated codebook is proposed to be decomposed by Tucker decomposition into three lowdimensional units, i.e., statistical channel direction information in horizontal and vertical directions respectively, and statistical channel power in the joint horizontal and vertical direction. A closed-form suboptimal solution is provided to reduce the computational complexity in Tucker decomposition. The proposed codebook has a significant dimension reduction from conventional rotated codebooks, and is applicable for 3D MIMO system with arbitrary form of antenna array. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed codebook works very well for various 3D MIMO systems.
  • The light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powered by the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni to $^{56}$Co at early times, and the decay of $^{56}$Co to $^{56}$Fe from ~60 days after explosion. We examine the evolution of the [Co III] 5892 A emission complex during the nebular phase for SNe Ia with multiple nebular spectra and show that the line flux follows the square of the mass of $^{56}$Co as a function of time. This result indicates both efficient local energy deposition from positrons produced in $^{56}$Co decay, and long-term stability of the ionization state of the nebula. We compile 77 nebular spectra of 25 SN Ia from the literature and present 17 new nebular spectra of 7 SNe Ia, including SN2014J. From these we measure the flux in the [Co III] 5892 A line and remove its well-behaved time dependence to infer the initial mass of $^{56}$Ni ($M_{Ni}$) produced in the explosion. We then examine $^{56}$Ni yields for different SN Ia ejected masses ($M_{ej}$ - calculated using the relation between light curve width and ejected mass) and find the $^{56}$Ni masses of SNe Ia fall into two regimes: for narrow light curves (low stretch s~0.7-0.9), $M_{Ni}$ is clustered near $M_{Ni}$ ~ 0.4$M_\odot$ and shows a shallow increase as $M_{ej}$ increases from ~1-1.4$M_\odot$; at high stretch, $M_{ej}$ clusters at the Chandrasekhar mass (1.4$M_\odot$) while $M_{Ni}$ spans a broad range from 0.6-1.2$M_\odot$. This could constitute evidence for two distinct SN Ia explosion mechanisms.
  • OzDES is a five-year, 100-night, spectroscopic survey on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, whose primary aim is to measure redshifts of approximately 2,500 Type Ia supernovae host galaxies over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 1.2, and derive reverberation-mapped black hole masses for approximately 500 active galactic nuclei and quasars over 0.3 < z < 4.5. This treasure trove of data forms a major part of the spectroscopic follow-up for the Dark Energy Survey for which we are also targeting cluster galaxies, radio galaxies, strong lenses, and unidentified transients, as well as measuring luminous red galaxies and emission line galaxies to help calibrate photometric redshifts. Here we present an overview of the OzDES program and our first-year results. Between Dec 2012 and Dec 2013, we observed over 10,000 objects and measured more than 6,000 redshifts. Our strategy of retargeting faint objects across many observing runs has allowed us to measure redshifts for galaxies as faint as m_r=25 mag. We outline our target selection and observing strategy, quantify the redshift success rate for different types of targets, and discuss the implications for our main science goals. Finally, we highlight a few interesting objects as examples of the fortuitous yet not totally unexpected discoveries that can come from such a large spectroscopic survey.
  • This paper proposes a codebook for jointly quantizing channel direction information (CDI) of spatially correlated three-dimensional (3D) multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) channels. To reduce the dimension for quantizing the CDI of large antenna arrays, we introduce a special structure to the codewords by using Tucker decomposition to exploit the unique features of 3D MIMO channels. Specifically, the codeword consists of four parts each with low dimension individually targeting at a different type of information: statistical CDIs in horizontal direction and in vertical direction, statistical power coupling, and instantaneous CDI. The proposed codebook avoids the redundancy led by existing independent CDI quantization. Analytical results provide a sufficient condition on 3D MIMO channels to show that the proposed codebook can achieve the same quantization performance as the well-known rotated codebook applied to the global channel CDI, but with significant reduction in the required statistical channel information. Simulation results validate our analysis and demonstrate that the proposed joint CDI quantization provides substantial performance gain over independent CDI quantization.
  • We use natural seeing imaging of SN 2013ej in M74 to identify a progenitor candidate in archival {\it Hubble Space Telescope} + ACS images. We find a source coincident with the SN in the {\it F814W}-filter, however the position of the progenitor candidate in contemporaneous {\it F435W} and {\it F555W}-filters is significantly offset. We conclude that the "progenitor candidate" is in fact two physically unrelated sources; a blue source which is likely unrelated to the SN, and a red source which we suggest exploded as SN 2013ej. Deep images with the same instrument onboard {\it HST} taken when the supernova has faded (in approximately two years time) will allow us to accurately characterise the unrelated neighbouring source and hence determine the intrinsic flux of the progenitor in three filters. We suggest that the {\it F814W} flux is dominated by the progenitor of SN 2013ej, and assuming a bolometric correction appropriate to an M-type supergiant, we estimate that the mass of the progenitor of SN 2013ej was between 8 -- 15.5 M$_{\odot}$.
  • We put constraints on the properties of the progenitors of peculiar calcium-rich transients using the distribution of locations within their host galaxies. We confirm that this class of transients do not follow the galaxy stellar mass profile and are more likely to be found in remote locations of their apparent hosts. We test the hypothesis that these transients are from low metallicity progenitors by comparing their spatial distributions with the predictions of self-consistent cosmological simulations that include star formation and chemical enrichment. We find that while metal-poor stars and our transient sample show a consistent preference for large offsets, metallicity alone cannot explain the extreme cases. Invoking a lower age limit on the progenitor helps to improve the match, indicating these events may result from a very old metal-poor population. We also investigate the radial distribution of globular cluster systems, and show that they too are consistent with the class of calcium-rich transients. Because photometric upper limits exist for globular clusters for some members of the class, a production mechanism related to the dense environment of globular clusters is not favoured for the calcium-rich events. However the methods developed in this paper may be used in the future to constrain the effects of low metallicity on radially distant core-collapse events or help establish a correlation with globular clusters for other classes of peculiar explosions.
  • We present observations of the interacting transient SN 2009ip, from the start of the outburst in October 2012 until the end of the 2012 observing season. The transient reached a peak of $M_V$=-17.7 mag before fading rapidly, with a total integrated luminosity of 1.9$\times10^{49}$ erg over the period of August-December 2012. The optical and near infrared spectra are dominated by narrow emission lines, signaling a dense circumstellar environment, together with multiple components of broad emission and absorption in H and He at velocities between 0.5-1.2$\times10^4$ km s$^{-1}$\. We see no evidence for nucleosynthesized material in SN 2009ip, even in late-time pseudo-nebular spectra. We set a limit of $<$0.02 M$_{\odot}$\ on the mass of any synthesized $^{56}$Ni from the late time lightcurve. A simple model for the narrow Balmer lines is presented, and used to derive number densities for the circumstellar medium of between $\sim 10^{9}-10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$. Our near-infrared data does not show any excess at longer wavelengths. Our last data, taken in December 2012, shows that SN 2009ip has spectroscopically evolved to something quite similar to its appearance in late 2009, albeit with higher velocities. It is possible that neither of the eruptive and high luminosity events of SN 2009ip were induced by a core-collapse. We show that the peak and total integrated luminosity can be due to the efficient conversion of kinetic energy from colliding ejecta, and that around 0.05-0.1 M$_{\odot}$\ of material moving at 0.5-1$\times10^4$ km s$^{-1}$\ could comfortably produce the observed luminosity. The ejection of multiple shells, lack of evidence for nucleosynthesied elements and broad nebular lines, are all consistent with the pulsational-pair instability scenario. In this case the progenitor star may still exist, and will be observed after the current outburst fades.
  • We calculate the volumetric rate of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) based on 5 events discovered with the ROTSE-IIIb telescope. We gather light curves of 19 events from the literature and our own unpublished data and employ crude k-corrections to constrain the pseudo-absolute magnitude distributions in the rest frame ROTSE-IIIb (unfiltered) band pass for both the hydrogen poor (SLSN-I) and hydrogen rich (SLSN-II) populations. We find that the peak magnitudes of the available SLSN-I are narrowly distributed ($M = -21.7 \pm 0.4$) in our unfiltered band pass and may suggest an even tighter intrinsic distribution when the effects of dust are considered, although the sample may be skewed by selection and publication biases. The presence of OII features near maximum light may uniquely signal a high luminosity event, and we suggest further observational and theoretical work is warranted to assess the possible utility of such SN 2005ap-like SLSN-I as distance indicators. Using the pseudo-absolute magnitude distributions derived from the light curve sample, we measure the SLSN-I rate to be about (32^{+77}_{-26}) events Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1} h_{71}^{3} at a weighted redshift of z = 0.17, and the SLSN-II rate to be about (151^{+151}_{-82}) events Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1} h_{71}^{3} at z = 0.15. Given that the exact nature and limits of these populations are still unknown, we discuss how it may be difficult to distinguish these rare SLSNe from other transient phenomena such as AGN activity and tidal disruption events even when multi-band photometry, spectroscopy, or even high resolution imaging are available. Including one spectroscopically peculiar event, we determine a total rate for SLSN-like events of (199^{+137}_{-86}) events Gpc^{-3} yr^{-1} h_{71}^{3} at z = 0.16.
  • We present a sample of 23 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae that were discovered in the background of galaxy clusters targeted by ROTSE-IIIb and use up to 18 of these to determine the local (z = 0.05) volumetric rate. Since our survey is flux limited and thus biased against fainter objects, the pseudo-absolute magnitude distribution (pAMD) of SNeIa in a given volume is an important concern, especially the relative frequency of high to low-luminosity SNeIa. We find that the pAMD derived from the volume limited Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) sample is incompatible with the distribution of SNeIa in a volume limited (z<0.12) sub sample of the SDSS-II. The LOSS sample requires far more low-luminosity SNeIa than the SDSS-II can accommodate. Even though LOSS and SDSS-II have sampled different SNeIa populations, their volumetric rates are surprisingly similar. Using the same model pAMD adopted in the SDSS-II SNeIa rate calculation and excluding two high-luminosity SNeIa from our sample, we derive a rate that is marginally higher than previous low-redshift determinations. With our full sample and the LOSS pAMD our rate is more than double the canonical value. We also find that 5 of our 18 SNeIa are hosted by very low-luminosity (M_B > -16) galaxies, whereas only 1 out 79 nearby SDSS-II SNeIa have such faint hosts. It is possible that previous works have under-counted either low luminosity SNeIa, SNeIa in low luminosity hosts, or peculiar SNeIa (sometimes explicitly), and the total SNeIa rate may be higher than the canonical value.
  • The signal-to-leakage-and-noise ratio (SLNR) precoder is widely used for MU-MIMO systems in many works, and observed with improved performance from zeroforcing (ZF) precoder. Our work proofs SLNR precoder is completely equivalent to conventional regulated ZF (RZF) precoder, which has significant gain over ZF precoder at low SNRs. Therefore, with our conclusion, the existing performance analysis about RZF precoder can be readily applicable to SLNR precoder.
  • We present optical photometric and low-resolution spectroscopic observations of the Type II plateau supernova (SN) 2008in, which occurred in the outskirts of the nearly face-on spiral galaxy M 61. Photometric data in the X-rays, ultraviolet and near-infrared bands have been used to characterize this event. The SN field was imaged with the ROTSE-IIIb optical telescope about seven days before the explosion. This allowed us to constrain the epoch of the shock breakout to JD = 2454825.6. The duration of the plateau phase, as derived from the photometric monitoring, was ~ 98 days. The spectra of SN 2008in show a striking resemblance to those of the archetypal low-luminosity IIP SNe 1997D and 1999br. A comparison of ejecta kinematics of SN 2008in with the hydrodynamical simulations of Type IIP SNe by Dessart et al. (2010) indicates that it is a less energetic event (~ 5$\times10^{50}$ erg). However, the light curve indicates that the production of radioactive $^{56}$Ni is significantly higher than that in the low-luminosity SNe. Adopting an interstellar absorption along the SN direction of $A_V$ ~ 0.3 mag and a distance of 13.2 Mpc, we estimated a synthesized Ni mass of ~ 0.015 $M_{\odot}$. Employing semi-analytical formulae (Litvinova & Nadezhin 1985), we derived a pre-SN radius of ~ 126$R_{\odot}$, an explosion energy of ~ 5.4$\times10^{50}$ erg and a total ejected mass of ~ 16.7$M_{\odot}$. The latter indicates that the zero age main-sequence mass of the progenitor did not exceed 20$M_{\odot}$. Considering the above properties of SN 2008in, and its occurrence in a region of sub-solar metallicity ([O/H] ~ 8.44 dex), it is unlikely that fall-back of the ejecta onto a newly formed black hole occurred in SN 2008in. We therefore favor a low-energy explosion scenario of a relatively compact, moderate-mass progenitor star that generates a neutron star.
  • Game Theory has been frequently applied in biological research since 1970s. While the key idea of Game Theory is Nash Equilibrium, it is critical to understand and figure out the payoff matrix in order to calculate Nash Equilibrium. In this paper we present a dynamic programming implemented method to compute 2x2 non-cooperative finite resource allocation game's payoff matrix. We assume in one population there exists two types of individuals, aggressive and non-aggressive and each individual has equal and finite resource. The strength of individual could be described by a function of resource consumption in discrete development stages. Each individual undergoes logistic growth hence we divide the development into three stages: initialization, quasilinear growth and termination. We first discuss the theoretical frame of how to dynamic programming to calculate payoff matrix then give three numerical examples representing three different types of aggressive individuals and calculate the payoff matrix for each of them respectively. Based on the numerical payoff matrix we further investigate the evolutionary stable strategies (ESS) of the games.
  • In recent years, there has been a proliferation of wide-field sky surveys to search for a variety of transient objects. Using relatively short focal lengths, the optics of these systems produce undersampled stellar images often marred by a variety of aberrations. As participants in such activities, we have developed a new algorithm for image subtraction that no longer requires high quality reference images for comparison. The computational efficiency is comparable with similar procedures currently in use. The general technique is cross-convolution: two convolution kernels are generated to make a test image and a reference image separately transform to match as closely as possible. In analogy to the optimization technique for generating smoothing splines, the inclusion of an RMS width penalty term constrains the diffusion of stellar images. In addition, by evaluating the convolution kernels on uniformly spaced subimages across the total area, these routines can accomodate point spread functions that vary considerably across the focal plane.