• Despite the recent advances in developing more effective thresholding methods to convert weighted networks to unweighted counterparts, there are still several limitations that need to be addressed. One such limitation is the inability of the most existing thresholding methods to take into account the topological properties of the original weighted networks during the binarization process, which could ultimately result in unweighted networks that have drastically different topological properties than the original weighted networks. In this study, we propose a new thresholding method based on the percolation theory to address this limitation. The performance of the proposed method was validated and compared to the existing thresholding methods using simulated and real-world functional connectivity networks in the brain. Comparison of macroscopic and microscopic properties of the resulted unweighted networks to the original weighted networks suggest that the proposed thresholding method can successfully maintain the topological properties of the original weighted networks.
  • We propose a novel computational method to extract information about interactions among individuals with different behavioral states in a biological collective from ordinary video recordings. Assuming that individuals are acting as finite state machines, our method first detects discrete behavioral states of those individuals and then constructs a model of their state transitions, taking into account the positions and states of other individuals in the vicinity. We have tested the proposed method through applications to two real-world biological collectives: termites in an experimental setting and human pedestrians in a university campus. For each application, a robust tracking system was developed in-house, utilizing interactive human intervention (for termite tracking) or online agent-based simulation (for pedestrian tracking). In both cases, significant interactions were detected between nearby individuals with different states, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method.