• Combining measurements on the expansion history of the Universe and on the growth rate of cosmic structures is key to discriminate between alternative cosmological frameworks and to test gravity. Recently, Linder (2017) proposed a new diagram to investigate the joint evolutionary track of these two quantities. In this letter, we collect the most recent cosmic growth and expansion rate datasets to provide the state-of-the-art observational constraints on this diagram. By performing a joint statistical analysis of both probes, we test the standard $\Lambda$CDM model, confirming a mild tension between cosmic microwave background predictions from Planck mission and cosmic growth measurements at low redshift ($z<2$). Then we test alternative models allowing the variation of one single cosmological parameter at a time. In particular, we find a larger growth index than the one predicted by general relativity $\gamma=0.65^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$). However, also a standard model with total neutrino mass of $0.26\pm0.10$ eV provides a similarly accurate description of the current data. By simulating an additional dataset consistent with next-generation dark-energy mission forecasts, we show that growth rate constraints at $z>1$ will be crucial to discriminate between alternative models.
  • Redshift-space clustering anisotropies caused by cosmic peculiar velocities provide a powerful probe to test the gravity theory on large scales. However, to extract unbiased physical constraints, the clustering pattern has to be modelled accurately, taking into account the effects of non-linear dynamics at small scales, and properly describing the link between the selected cosmic tracers and the underlying dark matter field. We use a large hydrodynamic simulation to investigate how the systematic error on the linear growth rate, $f$, caused by model uncertainties, depends on sample selections and comoving scales. Specifically, we measure the redshift-space two-point correlation function of mock samples of galaxies, galaxy clusters and Active Galactic Nuclei, extracted from the Magneticum simulation, in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 2, and adopting different sample selections. We estimate $f\sigma_8$ by modelling both the monopole and the full two-dimensional anisotropic clustering, using the dispersion model. We find that the systematic error on $f\sigma_8$ depends significantly on the range of scales considered for the fit. If the latter is kept fixed, the error depends on both redshift and sample selection, due to the scale-dependent impact of non-linearities, if not properly modelled. On the other hand, we show that it is possible to get unbiased constraints on $f\sigma_8$ provided that the analysis is restricted to a proper range of scales, that depends non trivially on the properties of the sample. This can have a strong impact on multiple tracers analyses, and when combining catalogues selected at different redshifts.
  • We present new numerical tools to analyse cosmic void catalogues, implemented inside the CosmoBolognaLib, a large set of Open Source C++/Python numerical libraries. The CosmoBolognaLib provides a common numerical environment for cosmological calculations. This work extends these libraries by adding new algorithms for cosmological analyses of cosmic voids, covering the existing gap between theory and observations. We implemented new methods to model the size function of cosmic voids, in both observed and simulated samples of dark matter and biased tracers. Moreover, we provide new numerical tools to construct unambiguous void catalogues. The latter are designed to be independent of the void finder, in order to allow a high versatility in comparing independent results. The implemented Open Source software is available at the GitHub repository https://github.com/federicomarulli/CosmoBolognaLib. We provide also a full doxygen documentation and some example codes that explain how to use these libraries.
  • We investigate to which accuracy it is possible to recover the real-space two-point correlation function of galaxy clusters from cluster catalogues based on photometric redshifts, and test our ability to measure the redshift and mass evolution of the correlation length and the bias parameter as a function of the redshift uncertainty. We calculate the correlation function for cluster sub-samples covering various mass and redshift bins selected from a light-cone catalogue. To simulate the distribution of clusters in photometric redshift space, we assign to each cluster a redshift randomly extracted from a Gaussian distribution. The dispersion is varied in the range $\sigma_{(z=0)} = 0.001$ to $0.050$. The correlation function in real-space is computed through estimation and deprojection of $w_{p}(r_{p})$. Four mass ranges (from $M_{halo}> 2 \times 10^{13}$ to $M_{halo}> 2 \times 10^{14}$) and six redshift slices covering the redshift range [0,2] are investigated, using cosmological redshifts and photo-z configurations. We find a clear increase of the correlation amplitude as a function of redshift and mass for the $z_{c}$ samples. The evolution of the derived bias parameter is in agreement with theoretical expectations. From our pilot sample limited to $M_{halo}> 5 \times 10^{13} (0.4 < z < 0.7)$, we find that the real-space correlation function can be recovered by deprojection of $w_{p}(r_{p})$ within an accuracy of 5% for $\sigma_{z} = 0.001 \times (1 + z_{c})$ and within 10% for $\sigma_{z} = 0.03 \times (1 + z_{c})$. The evolution of the correlation in redshift and mass is clearly detected for all $\sigma_{z}$ tested. The best-fit parameters $(r_{0}$ and ${\gamma})$ as well as the bias obtained from the deprojection method for all $\sigma_{z}$ are within the $1 \sigma$ uncertainty of the $z_{c}$ sample.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We present the CosmoBolognaLib, a large set of Open Source C++ numerical libraries for cosmological calculations. CosmoBolognaLib is a living project aimed at defining a common numerical environment for cosmological investigations of the large-scale structure of the Universe. In particular, one of the primary focuses of this software is to help in handling astronomical catalogues, both real and simulated, measuring one-point, two-point and three-point statistics in configuration space, and performing cosmological analyses. In this paper, we discuss the main features of this software, providing an overview of all the available C++ classes implemented up to now. Both the CosmoBolognaLib and their associated doxygen documentation can be freely downloaded at https://github.com/federicomarulli/CosmoBolognaLib. We provide also some examples to explain how these libraries can be included in either C++ or Python codes.
  • We provide constraints on the accuracy with which the neutrino mass fraction, $f_{\nu}$, can be estimated when exploiting measurements of redshift-space distortions, describing in particular how the error on neutrino mass depends on three fundamental parameters of a characteristic galaxy redshift survey: density, halo bias and volume. In doing this, we make use of a series of dark matter halo catalogues extracted from the BASICC simulation. The mock data are analysed via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis. We find a fitting function that well describes the dependence of the error on bias, density and volume, showing a decrease in the error as the bias and volume increase, and a decrease with density down to an almost constant value for high density values. This fitting formula allows us to produce forecasts on the precision achievable with future surveys on measurements of the neutrino mass fraction. For example, a Euclid-like spectroscopic survey should be able to measure the neutrino mass fraction with an accuracy of $\delta f_{\nu} \approx 6.7\times10^{-4}$, using redshift-space clustering once all the other cosmological parameters are kept fixed to the $\Lambda$CDM case.
  • We analyse the largest spectroscopic samples of galaxy clusters to date, and provide observational constraints on the distance-redshift relation from baryon acoustic oscillations. The cluster samples considered in this work have been extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at three median redshifts, $z=0.2$, $z=0.3$, and $z=0.5$. The number of objects is $12910$, $42215$, and $11816$, respectively. We detect the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations for all the three samples. The derived distance constraints are: $r_s/D_V(z=0.2)=0.18 \pm 0.01$, $r_s/D_V(z=0.3)=0.124 \pm 0.004$ and $r_s/D_V(z=0.5)=0.080 \pm 0.002$. Combining these measurements, we obtain robust constraints on cosmological parameters. Our results are in agreement with the standard $\Lambda$ cold dark matter model. Specifically, we constrain the Hubble constant in a $\Lambda$CDM model, $H_0 = 64_{-9}^{+14} \, \mathrm{km} \, \mathrm{s}^{-1}\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$, the density of curvature energy, in the $o\Lambda$CDM context, $\Omega_K = -0.015_{-0.36}^{+0.34}$, and finally the parameter of the dark energy equation of state in the $ow$CDM case, $w = -1.01_{-0.44}^{+0.44}$. This is the first time the distance-redshift relation has been constrained using only the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations of galaxy clusters.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • In this work we analyse the properties of cosmic voids in standard and coupled dark energy cosmologies. Using large numerical simulations, we investigate the effects produced by the dark energy coupling on three statistics: the filling factor, the size distribution and the stacked profiles of cosmic voids. We find that the bias of the tracers of the density field used to identify the voids strongly influences the properties of the void catalogues, and, consequently, the possibility of using the identified voids as a probe to distinguish coupled dark energy models from the standard $\Lambda $CDM cosmology. In fact, on one hand coupled dark energy models are characterised by an excess of large voids in the cold dark matter distribution as compared to the reference standard cosmology, due to their higher normalisation of linear perturbations at low redshifts. Specifically, these models present an excess of large voids with $R_{eff}>20, 15, 12$ Mpc h^{-1}, at $z=0, 0.55, 1$, respectively. On the other hand, we do not find any significant difference in the properties of the void detected in the distribution of collapsed dark matter halos. These results imply that the tracer bias has a significant impact on the possibility of using cosmic void catalogues to probe cosmology.
  • The joint analysis of clustering and stacked gravitational lensing of galaxy clusters in large surveys can constrain the formation and evolution of structures and the cosmological parameters. On scales outside a few virial radii, the halo bias, $b$, is linear and the lensing signal is dominated by the correlated distribution of matter around galaxy clusters. We discuss a method to measure the power spectrum amplitude $\sigma_8$ and $b$ based on a minimal modelling. We considered a sample of $\sim 120000$ clusters photometrically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the redshift range $0.1<z<0.6$. The auto-correlation was studied through the two-point function of a subsample of $\sim 70000$ clusters; the matter-halo correlation was derived from the weak lensing signal of the subsample of $\sim 1200$ clusters with Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey data. We obtained a direct measurement of $b$, which increases with mass in agreement with predictions of the $\Lambda$CDM paradigm. Assuming $\Omega_\mathrm{M}=0.3$, we found $\sigma_8=0.78\pm0.16$. We used the same clusters for measuring both lensing and clustering and the estimate of $\sigma_8$ did require neither the mass-richness relation, nor the knowledge of the selection function, nor the modelling of $b$. With an additional theoretical prior on the bias, we obtained $\sigma_8=0.75\pm0.08$.
  • Cosmic voids are effective cosmological probes to discriminate among competing world models. Their identification is generally based on density or geometry criteria that, because of their very nature, are prone to shot noise. We propose two void finders that are based on dynamical criterion to select voids in Lagrangian coordinates and minimise the impact of sparse sampling. The first approach exploits the Zel'dovich approximation to trace back in time the orbits of galaxies located in voids and their surroundings, the second uses the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function to relax the objects' spatial distribution to homogeneity and isotropy. In both cases voids are defined as regions of the negative velocity divergence, that can be regarded as sinks of the back-in-time streamlines of the mass tracers. To assess the performance of our methods we used a dark matter halo mock catalogue CoDECS, and compared the results with those obtained with the ZOBOV void finder. We find that the void divergence profiles are less scattered than the density ones and, therefore, their stacking constitutes a more accurate cosmological probe. The significance of the divergence signal in the central part of voids obtained from both our finders is 60% higher than for overdensity profiles in the ZOBOV case. The ellipticity of the stacked void measured in the divergence field is closer to unity, as expected, than what is found when using halo positions. Therefore our void finders are complementary to the existing methods, that should contribute to improve the accuracy of void-based cosmological tests.
  • We investigate the possibility of constraining coupled dark energy (cDE) cosmologies using the three-point correlation function (3PCF). Making use of the CoDECS N-body simulations, we study the statistical properties of cold dark matter (CDM) haloes for a variety of models, including a fiducial $\Lambda$CDM scenario and five models in which dark energy (DE) and CDM mutually interact. We measure both the halo 3PCF, $\zeta(\theta)$, and the reduced 3PCF, $Q(\theta)$, at different scales ($2<r\,[$Mpc\h$]<40$) and redshifts ($0\leq z\leq2$). In all cDE models considered in this work, $Q(\theta)$ appears flat at small scales (for all redshifts) and at low redshifts (for all scales), while it builds up the characteristic V-shape anisotropy at increasing redshifts and scales. With respect to the $\Lambda $CDM predictions, cDE models show lower (higher) values of the halo 3PCF for perpendicular (elongated) configurations. The effect is also scale-dependent, with differences between $\Lambda$CDM and cDE models that increase at large scales. We made use of these measurements to estimate the halo bias, that results in fair agreement with the one computed from the two-point correlation function (2PCF). The main advantage of using both the 2PCF and 3PCF is to break the bias$-\sigma_{8}$ degeneracy. Moreover, we find that our bias estimates are approximately independent of the assumed strength of DE coupling. This study demonstrates the power of a higher-order clustering analysis in discriminating between alternative cosmological scenarios, for both present and forthcoming galaxy surveys, such as e.g. BOSS and Euclid.
  • By using a suite of large box-size N-body simulations that incorporate massive neutrinos as an extra set of particles, we investigate the impact of neutrino masses on the spatial distribution of dark matter haloes and galaxies. We compute the bias between the spatial distribution of dark matter haloes and the overall matter and cold dark matter distributions using statistical tools such as the power spectrum and the two-point correlation function. Overall we find a scale-dependent bias on large scales for the cosmologies with massive neutrinos. However, our results indicate that the scale-dependence in the bias is reduced if the latter is computed with respect to the cold dark matter distribution only. We find that the value of the bias on large scales is reasonably well reproduced by the Tinker fitting formula once the linear cold dark matter power spectrum is used, instead of the total matter power spectrum. We investigate whether scale-dependent bias really comes from purely neutrino's effect or from nonlinear gravitational collapse of haloes. For this purpose, we address the $\Omega_\nu$-$\sigma_8$ degeneracy and find that such degeneracy is not perfect, implying that neutrinos imprint a slight scale dependence on the large-scale bias. Finally, by using a simple halo occupation distribution (HOD) model, we investigate the impact of massive neutrinos on the distribution of galaxies within dark matter haloes. We use the main galaxy sample in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Data Release 7 to investigate if the small-scale galaxy clustering alone can be used to discriminate among different cosmological models with different neutrino masses. Our results suggest that different choices of the HOD parameters can reproduce the observational measurements relatively well, and we quantify the difference between the values of the HOD parameters between massless and massive neutrino cosmologies.
  • We study the halo mass accretion history (MAH) and its correlation with the internal structural properties in coupled dark energy cosmologies (cDE). To accurately predict all the non-linear effects caused by dark interactions, we use the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS). We measure the halo concentration at z=0 and the number of substructures above a mass resolution threshold for each halo. Tracing the halo merging history trees back in time, following the mass of the main halo, we develope a MAH model that accurately reproduces the halo growth in term of M_{200} in the {\Lambda}CDM Universe; we then compare the MAH in different cosmological scenarios. For cDE models with a weak constant coupling, our MAH model can reproduce the simulation results, within 10% of accuracy, by suitably rescaling the normalization of the linear matter power spectrum at z=0, {\sigma}_8. However, this is not the case for more complex scenarios, like the "bouncing" cDE model, for which the numerical analysis shows a rapid growth of haloes at high redshifts, that cannot be reproduced by simply rescaling the value of {\sigma}_8. Moreover, at fixed value of {\sigma}_8, cold dark matter (CDM) haloes in these cDE scenarios tend to be more concentrated and have a larger amount of substructures with respect to {\Lambda}CDM predictions. Finally, we present an accurate model that relates the halo concentration to the time at which it assembles half or 4% of its mass. Combining this with our MAH model, we show how halo concentrations change while varying only {\sigma}_8 in a {\Lambda}CDM Universe, at fixed halo mass.
  • We investigate the impact of statistical and systematic errors on measurements of linear redshift-space distortions (RSD) in future cosmological surveys, analyzing large catalogues of dark-matter halos from the BASICC simulation. These allow us to estimate the dependence of errors on typical survey properties, as volume, galaxy density and mass (i.e. bias factor) of the adopted tracer. We find that measures of the specific growth rate \beta=f/b using the Hamilton/Kaiser harmonic expansion of the redshift-space correlation function \xi(r_p,\pi) on scales larger than 3/h Mpc are typically under-estimated by up to 10% for galaxy sized halos. This is significantly larger than the corresponding statistical errors, which amount to a few percent, indicating the importance of non-linear improvements to the Kaiser model to obtain accurate measurements of the growth rate. We compare the statistical errors to predictions obtained with the Fisher information matrix, based on the usual FKP prescription for the errors on the power spectrum. We show that this produces parameter errors fairly similar to the standard deviations from the halo catalogues, but only if applied to strictly linear scales in Fourier space (k<0.2 h/Mpc). Finally, we present an accurate scaling formula describing the relative error on {\beta} as a function of the survey parameters, which closely matches the simulation results in all explored regimes. This provides a handy and plausibly more realistic alternative to the Fisher matrix approach, to quickly and accurately predict RSD statistical errors expected from future surveys.
  • The baryonic acoustic peak in the correlation function of galaxies and galaxy clusters provides a standard ruler to probe the space-time geometry of the Universe, jointly constraining the angular diameter distance and the Hubble expansion rate. Moreover, non-linear effects can systematically shift the peak position, giving us the opportunity to exploit this clustering feature also as a dynamical probe. We investigate the possibility of detecting interactions in the dark sector through an accurate determination of the baryonic acoustic scale. Making use of the public halo catalogues extracted from the CoDECS simulations -- the largest suite of N-body simulations of interacting dark energy models to date -- we determine the position of the baryonic scale fitting a band-filtered correlation function, specifically designed to amplify the signal at the sound horizon. We analyze the shifts due to non-linear dynamics, redshift-space distortions and Gaussian redshift errors, in the range 0 < z < 2. Since the coupling between dark energy and dark matter affects in a particular way the clustering properties of haloes and, specifically, the amplitude and location of the baryonic acoustic oscillations, the cosmic evolution of the baryonic peak position might provide a direct way to discriminate interacting dark energy models from the standard \Lambda CDM framework. To maximize the efficiency of the baryonic peak as a dynamic probe, the correlation function has to be measured in redshift-space, where the baryonic acoustic shift due to non-linearities is amplified. The typical redshift errors of spectroscopic galaxy surveys do not significantly impact these results.
  • We investigate the impact of different observational effects affecting a precise and accurate measurement of the growth rate of fluctuations from the anisotropy of clustering in galaxy redshift surveys. We focus on redshift measurement errors, on the reconstruction of the underlying real-space clustering and on the apparent degeneracy existing with the geometrical distortions induced by the cosmology-dependent conversion of redshifts into distances. We use a suite of mock catalogues extracted from large N-body simulations, focusing on the analysis of intermediate, mildly non-linear scales and apply the standard linear dispersion model to fit the anisotropy of the observed correlation function. We verify that redshift errors up to ~0.2% have a negligible impact on the precision with which the specific growth rate beta can be measured. Larger redshift errors introduce a positive systematic error, which can be alleviated by adopting a Gaussian distribution function of pairwise velocities. This is, in any case, smaller than the systematic error of up to 10% due to the limitations of the linear dispersion model, which is studied in a separate paper. We then show that 50% of the statistical error budget on beta depends on the deprojection procedure through which the real-space correlation function is obtained. Finally, we demonstrate that the degeneracy with geometric distortions can in fact be circumvented. This is obtained through a modified version of the Alcock-Paczynski test in redshift-space, which successfully recovers the correct cosmology by searching for the solution that optimizes the description of dynamical redshift distortions. For a flat cosmology, we obtain largely independent, robust constraints on beta and OmegaM. In a volume of 2.4(Gpc/h)^3, the correct OmegaM is obtained with ~12% error and negligible bias, once the real-space correlation function is properly reconstructed.
  • We investigate the spatial properties of the large scale structure (LSS) of the Universe in the framework of coupled dark energy (cDE) cosmologies. Using the public halo catalogues from the CoDECS simulations -- the largest set of N-body experiments to date for such cosmological scenarios -- we estimate the clustering and bias functions of cold dark matter (CDM) haloes, both in real- and redshift-space. Moreover, we investigate the effects of the dark energy (DE) coupling on the geometric and dynamic redshift-space distortions, quantifying the difference with respect to the concordance LambdaCDM model. At z~0, the spatial properties of CDM haloes in cDE models appear very similar to the LambdaCDM case, even if the cDE models are normalized at last scattering in order to be consistent with the latest Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data. At higher redshifts, we find that the DE coupling produces a significant scale-dependent suppression of the halo clustering and bias function. This effect, that strongly depends on the coupling strength, is not degenerate with sigma8 at scales r<5-10 Mpc/h. Moreover, we find that the coupled DE strongly affects both the linear distortion parameter, beta, and the pairwise peculiar velocity dispersion, sigma12. Although the models considered in this work are found to be all in agreement with presently available observational data, the next generation of galaxy surveys will be able to put strong constraints on the level of coupling between DE and CDM exploiting the shape of redshift-space clustering anisotropies.
  • Cosmological neutrinos strongly affect the evolution of the largest structures in the Universe, i.e. galaxies and galaxy clusters. We use large box-size full hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the non-linear effects that massive neutrinos have on the spatial properties of cold dark matter (CDM) haloes. We quantify the difference with respect to the concordance LambdaCDM model of the halo mass function and of the halo two-point correlation function. We model the redshift-space distortions and compute the errors on the linear distortion parameter beta introduced if cosmological neutrinos are assumed to be massless. We find that, if not taken correctly into account and depending on the total neutrino mass, these effects could lead to a potentially fake signature of modified gravity. Future nearly all-sky spectroscopic galaxy surveys will be able to constrain the neutrino mass if it is larger than 0.6 eV, using beta measurements alone and independently of the value of the matter power spectrum normalisation. In combination with other cosmological probes, this will strengthen neutrino mass constraints and help breaking parameter degeneracies.
  • Recent analyses of the fluctuations of the soft Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) have provided indirect detection of a component consistent with the elusive Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). In this work we use theoretical predictions obtained from hydrodynamical simulations to investigate the angular correlation properties of the WHIM in emission and assess the possibility of indirect detection with next-generation X-ray missions. Our results indicate that the angular correlation signal of the WHIM is generally weak but dominates the angular correlation function of the DXB outside virialized regions. Its indirect detection is possible but requires rather long exposure times [0.1-1] Ms, large (~1{\deg} x1{\deg}) fields of view and accurate subtraction of isotropic fore/background contributions, mostly contributed by Galactic emission. The angular correlation function of the WHIM is positive for {\theta} < 5' and provides limited information on its spatial distribution. A satisfactory characterization of the WHIM in 3D can be obtained through spatially resolved spectroscopy. 1 Ms long exposures with next generation detectors will allow to detect ~400 O VII+O VIII X-ray emission systems that we use to trace the spatial distribution of the WHIM. We predict that these observations will allow to estimate the WHIM correlation function with high statistical significance out to ~10 Mpc h^-1 and characterize its dynamical state through the analysis of redshift-space distortions. The detectable WHIM, which is typically associated with the outskirts of virialized regions rather than the filaments has a non-zero correlation function with slope {\gamma} = -1.7 \pm 0.1 and correlation length r0 = 4.0 \pm 0.1 Mpc h^-1 in the range r = [4.5, 12] Mpc h^-1. Redshift space distances can be measured to assess the dynamical properties of the gas, typically infalling onto large virialized structures.
  • We use semi-analytic modeling on top of the Millennium simulation to study the joint formation of galaxies and their embedded supermassive black holes. Our goal is to test scenarios in which black hole accretion and quasar activity are triggered by galaxy mergers, and to constrain different models for the lightcurves associated with individual quasar events. In the present work we focus on studying the spatial distribution of simulated quasars. At all luminosities, we find that the simulated quasar two-point correlation function is fit well by a single power-law in the range 0.5 < r < 20 h^{-1} Mpc, but its normalization is a strong function of redshift. When we select only quasars with luminosities within the range typically accessible by today's quasar surveys, their clustering strength depends only weakly on luminosity, in agreement with observations. This holds independently of the assumed lightcurve model, since bright quasars are black holes accreting close to the Eddington limit, and are hosted by dark matter haloes with a narrow mass range of a few 10^12 h^{-1} M_sun. Therefore the clustering of bright quasars cannot be used to disentangle lightcurve models, but such a discrimination would become possible if the observational samples can be pushed to significantly fainter limits. Overall, our clustering results for the simulated quasar population agree rather well with observations, lending support to the conjecture that galaxy mergers could be the main physical process responsible for triggering black hole accretion and quasar activity.
  • We study the spatial distribution of X-ray selected AGN in the framework of hierarchical co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies and dark matter haloes. To this end, we have applied the model developed by Croton et al.(2006), De Lucia & Blaizot(2007) and Marulli et al.(2008) to the output of the Millennium Run and obtained hundreds of realizations of past light-cones from which we have extracted realistic mock AGN catalogues that mimic the Chandra deep fields. We find that the model AGN number counts are in fair agreement with observations, except at fluxes <1e-15 erg/cm^2/s. The spatial two-point correlation function predicted by the model is well described by a power-law relation out to 20 Mpc/h, in close agreement with observations. Our model matches the correlation length r_0 of AGN in the Chandra Deep Field North but underestimates it in the Chandra Deep Field South. When fixing the slope to gamma = 1.4, as in Gilli et al. (2005), the statistical significance of the mismatch is 2-2.5 sigma, suggesting that the predicted cosmic variance, which dominates the error budget, may not account for the different correlation length of the AGN in the two fields. While our results are robust to changes in the model prescriptions for the AGN lightcurves, the luminosity dependence of the clustering is sensitive to the different lightcurve models adopted. However, irrespective of the model considered, the luminosity dependence of the AGN clustering in our mock fields seems to be weaker than in the real Chandra fields. The significance of this mismatch needs to be confirmed using larger datasets.
  • We model the cosmological co-evolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes (BHs) within a semi-analytical framework developed on the outputs of the Millennium Simulation. This model, described in detail in Croton et al. (2006) and De Lucia & Blaizot (2007), introduces a `radio mode' feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at the centre of X-ray emitting atmospheres in galaxy groups and clusters. Thanks to this mechanism, the model can simultaneously explain: (i) the low observed mass drop-out rate in cooling flows; (ii) the exponential cut-off in the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function; and (iii) the bulge-dominated morphologies and old stellar ages of the most massive galaxies in clusters. This paper is the first of a series in which we investigate how well this model can also reproduce the physical properties of BHs and AGN. Here we analyze the scaling relations, the fundamental plane and the mass function of BHs, and compare them with the most recent observational data. Moreover, we extend the semi-analytic model to follow the evolution of the BH mass accretion and its conversion into radiation, and compare the derived AGN bolometric luminosity function with the observed one. While we find for the most part a very good agreement between predicted and observed BH properties, the semi-analytic model underestimates the number density of luminous AGN at high redshifts, independently of the adopted Eddington factor and accretion efficiency. However, an agreement with the observations is possible within the framework of our model, provided it is assumed that the cold gas fraction accreted by BHs at high redshifts is larger than at low redshifts.