• We demonstrate that the shower-to-shower fluctuations of the muon content of extensive air showers correlate with the fluctuations of a variable of the first interaction of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, which is computed from the fraction of energy carried by the hadrons that sustain the hadronic cascade. The influence of subsequent stages of the shower development is found to play a sub-dominant role. As a consequence, the shower-to-shower distribution of the muon content is a direct probe of the hadron energy spectrum of interactions beyond 100 TeV center of mass energies.
  • The Monte Carlo model Sibyll has been designed for efficient simulation of hadronic multiparticle production up to the highest energies as needed for interpreting cosmic ray measurements. For more than 15 years, version 2.1 of Sibyll has been one of the standard models for air shower simulation. Motivated by data of LHC and fixed-target experiments and a better understanding of the phenomenology of hadronic interactions, we have developed an improved version of this model, version 2.3, which has been released in 2016. In this contribution we present a revised version of this model, called Sibyll 2.3c, that is further improved by adjusting particle production spectra to match the expectation of Feynman scaling in the fragmentation region. After a brief introduction to the changes implemented in Sibyll 2.3 and 2.3c with respect to Sibyll 2.1, the current predictions of the model for the depth of shower maximum, the number of muons at ground, and the energy spectrum of muons in extensive air showers are presented.
  • The event generator Sibyll can be used for the simulation of hadronic multiparticle production up to the highest cosmic ray energies. It is optimized for providing an economic description of those aspects of the expected hadronic final states that are needed for the calculation of air showers and atmospheric lepton fluxes. New measurements from fixed target and collider experiments, in particular those at LHC, allow us to test the predictive power of the model version 2.1, which was released more than 10 years ago, and also to identify shortcomings. Based on a detailed comparison of the model predictions with the new data we revisit model assumptions and approximations to obtain an improved version of the interaction model. In addition a phenomenological model for the production of charm particles is implemented as needed for the calculation of prompt lepton fluxes in the energy range of the astrophysical neutrinos recently discovered by IceCube. After giving an overview of the new ideas implemented in Sibyll and discussing how they lead to an improved description of accelerator data, predictions for air showers and atmospheric lepton fluxes are presented.
  • An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.
  • SIBYLL 2.1 is an event generator for hadron interactions at the highest energies. It is commonly used to analyze and interpret extensive air shower measurements. In light of the first detection of PeV neutrinos by the IceCube collaboration the inclusive fluxes of muons and neutrinos in the atmosphere have become very important. Predicting these fluxes requires understanding of the hadronic production of charmed particles since these contribute significantly to the fluxes at high energy through their prompt decay. We will present an updated version of SIBYLL that has been tuned to describe LHC data and extended to include the production of charmed hadrons.