• We allow database user to script a parallel relational database engine with a procedural language. Procedural language code is executed as a user defined relational query operator called transducer. Transducer is tightly integrated with relation engine, including query optimizer, query executor and can be executed in parallel like other query operators. With transducer, we can efficiently execute queries that are very difficult to express in SQL. As example, we show how to run time series and graph queries, etc, within a parallel relational database.
  • Eccentricity is an important orbital parameter. Understanding its effect on planetary climate and habitability is critical for us to search for a habitable world beyond our solar system. The orbital configurations of M-dwarf planets are always tidally-locked at resonance states, which are quite different from those around Sun-like stars. M-dwarf planets need to be investigated separately. Here we use a comprehensive three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model to systematically investigate how eccentricity influences climate and habitability of M-dwarf exoplanets. The simulation results show that (1) the seasonal climatic cycles of such planets are very weak even for e = 0.4. It is unlikely that an aqua planet falls out of a habitable zone during its orbit. (2) The annual global mean surface temperature significantly increases with increased eccentricity, due to the decrease of the cloud albedo. Both the runaway greenhouse inner edge and moist greenhouse inner edge shift outward. (3) Planets in an eccentric orbit can be captured in other spin-orbit resonance states which lead to different climate patterns, namely eyeball pattern and striped-ball pattern.The striped-ball pattern has evidently higher surface temperatures due to the reduced planetary albedo. Near the outer edge, planets with p = 1.0 and 2.0 are more resistant to the snowball state due to more locally-concentrated stellar fluxes. Thus, planets with integer spin-orbit resonance numbers have wider habitable zones than those with half-integer spin-orbit resonance states. Above all, as a comparison to circular orbit, eccentricity shrinks the width of the habitable zone.
  • We study classes of reproducing kernels $K$ on general domains; these are kernels which arise commonly in machine learning models; models based on certain families of reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces. They are the positive definite kernels $K$ with the property that there are countable discrete sample-subsets $S$; i.e., proper subsets $S$ having the property that every function in $\mathscr{H}\left(K\right)$ admits an $S$-sample representation. We give a characterizations of kernels which admit such non-trivial countable discrete sample-sets. A number of applications and concrete kernels are given in the second half of the paper.
  • Motivated by applications to the study of stochastic processes, we introduce a new analysis of positive definite kernels $K$, their reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS), and an associated family of feature spaces that may be chosen in the form $L^{2}\left(\mu\right)$; and we study the question of which measures $\mu$ are right for a particular kernel $K$. The answer to this depends on the particular application at hand. Such applications are the focus of the separate sections in the paper.
  • We study representations of positive definite kernels $K$ in a general setting, but with view to applications to harmonic analysis, to metric geometry, and to realizations of certain stochastic processes. Our initial results are stated for the most general given positive definite kernel, but are then subsequently specialized to the above mentioned applications. Given a positive definite kernel $K$ on $S\times S$ where $S$ is a fixed set, we first study families of factorizations of $K$. By a factorization (or representation) we mean a probability space $\left(B,\mu\right)$ and an associated stochastic process indexed by $S$ which has $K$ as its covariance kernel. For each realization we identify a co-isometric transform from $L^{2}\left(\mu\right)$ onto $\mathscr{H}\left(K\right)$, where $\mathscr{H}\left(K\right)$ denotes the reproducing kernel Hilbert space of $K$. In some cases, this entails a certain renormalization of $K$. Our emphasis is on such realizations which are minimal in a sense we make precise. By minimal we mean roughly that $B$ may be realized as a certain $K$-boundary of the given set $S$. We prove existence of minimal realizations in a general setting.
  • We consider reflection-positivity (Osterwalder-Schrader positivity, O.S.-p.) as it is used in the study of renormalization questions in physics. In concrete cases, this refers to specific Hilbert spaces that arise before and after the reflection. Our focus is a comparative study of the associated spectral theory, now referring to the canonical operators in these two Hilbert spaces. Indeed, the inner product which produces the respective Hilbert spaces of quantum states changes, and comparisons are subtle. We analyze in detail a number of geometric and spectral theoretic properties connected with axiomatic reflection positivity, as well as their probabilistic counterparts; especially the role of the Markov property. This view also suggests two new theorems, which we prove. In rough outline: It is possible to express OS-positivity purely in terms of a triple of projections in a fixed Hilbert space, and a reflection operator. For such three projections, there is a related property, often referred to as the Markov property; and it is well known that the latter implies the former; i.e., when the reflection is given, then the Markov property implies O.S.-p., but not conversely. In this paper we shall prove two theorems which flesh out a much more precise relationship between the two. We show that for every OS-positive system $\left(E_{+},\theta\right)$, the operator $E_{+}\theta E_{+}$ has a canonical and universal factorization.
  • Our main theorem is in the generality of the axioms of Hilbert space, and the theory of unbounded operators. Consider two Hilbert spaces such that their intersection contains a fixed vector space D. It is of interest to make a precise linking between such two Hilbert spaces when it is assumed that D is dense in one of the two; but generally not in the other. No relative boundedness is assumed. Nonetheless, under natural assumptions (motivated by potential theory), we prove a theorem where a comparison between the two Hilbert spaces is made via a specific selfadjoint semibounded operator. Applications include physical Hamiltonians, both continuous and discrete (infinite network models), and operator theory of reflection positivity.
  • We consider a kernel based harmonic analysis of "boundary," and boundary representations. Our setting is general: certain classes of positive definite kernels. Our theorems extend (and are motivated by) results and notions from classical harmonic analysis on the disk. Our positive definite kernels include those defined on infinite discrete sets, for example sets of vertices in electrical networks, or discrete sets which arise from sampling operations performed on positive definite kernels in a continuous setting. Below we give a summary of main conclusions in the paper: Starting with a given positive definite kernel $K$ we make precise generalized boundaries for $K$. They are measure theoretic "boundaries." Using the theory of Gaussian processes, we show that there is always such a generalized boundary for any positive definite kernel.
  • We study positive transfer operators $R$ in the setting of general measure spaces $\left(X,\mathscr{B}\right)$. For each $R$, we compute associated path-space probability spaces $\left(\Omega,\mathbb{P}\right)$. When the transfer operator $R$ is compatible with an endomorphism in $\left(X,\mathscr{B}\right)$, we get associated multiresolutions for the Hilbert spaces $L^{2}\left(\Omega,\mathbb{P}\right)$ where the path-space $\Omega$ may then be taken to be a solenoid. Our multiresolutions include both orthogonality relations and self-similarity algorithms for standard wavelets and for generalized wavelet-resolutions. Applications are given to topological dynamics, ergodic theory, and spectral theory, in general; to iterated function systems (IFSs), and to Markov chains in particular.
  • We present a catalog of panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 7 M and 4 K dwarf stars that span X-ray to infrared wavelengths (5 {\AA} - 5.5 {\mu}m). These SEDs are composites of Chandra or XMM-Newton data from 5 - ~50 {\AA}, a plasma emission model from ~50 - 100 {\AA}, broadband empirical estimates from 100 - 1170 {\AA}, HST data from 1170 - 5700 {\AA}, including a reconstruction of stellar Ly{\alpha} emission at 1215.67 {\AA}, and a PHOENIX model spectrum from 5700 - 55000 {\AA}. Using these SEDs, we computed the photodissociation rates of several molecules prevalent in planetary atmospheres when exposed to each star's unattenuated flux ("unshielded" photodissociation rates) and found that rates differ among stars by over an order of magnitude for most molecules. In general, the same spectral regions drive unshielded photodissociations both for the minimally and maximally FUV active stars. However, for ozone visible flux drives dissociation for the M stars whereas NUV flux drives dissociation for the K stars. We also searched for an FUV continuum in the assembled SEDs and detected it in 5/11 stars, where it contributes around 10% of the flux in the range spanned by the continuum bands. An ultraviolet continuum shape is resolved for the star {\epsilon} Eri that shows an edge likely attributable to Si II recombination. The 11 SEDs presented in this paper, available online through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, will be valuable for vetting stellar upper-atmosphere emission models and simulating photochemistry in exoplanet atmospheres.
  • Ground- and space-based planet searches employing radial velocity techniques and transit photometry have detected thousands of planet-hosting stars in the Milky Way. The chemistry of these atmospheres is controlled by the shape and absolute flux of the stellar spectral energy distribution, however, flux distributions of relatively inactive low-mass stars are poorly known at present. To better understand exoplanets orbiting low-mass stars, we have executed a panchromatic (X-ray to mid-IR) study of the spectral energy distributions of 11 nearby planet hosting stars, the {\it Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems} (MUSCLES) Treasury Survey. The MUSCLES program consists of contemporaneous observations at X-ray, UV, and optical wavelengths. We show that energetic radiation (X-ray and ultraviolet) is present from magnetically active stellar atmospheres at all times for stars as late as M5. Emission line luminosities of \ion{C}{4} and \ion{Mg}{2} are strongly correlated with band-integrated luminosities. We find that while the slope of the spectral energy distribution, FUV/NUV, increases by approximately two orders of magnitude form early K to late M dwarfs ($\approx$~0.01~to~1), the absolute FUV and XUV flux levels at their corresponding habitable zone distances are constant to within factors of a few, spanning the range 10~--~70 erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the habitable zone. Despite the lack of strong stellar activity indicators in their optical spectra, several of the M dwarfs in our sample show spectacular flare emission in their UV light curves. Finally, we interpret enhanced $L(line)$/$L_{Bol}$ ratios for \ion{C}{4} and \ion{N}{5} as tentative observational evidence for the interaction of planets with large planetary mass-to-orbital distance ratios ($M_{plan}$/$a_{plan}$) with the transition regions of their host stars.
  • We have reanalyzed reaction cross sections of 16N on 12C target. The nucleon density distribution of 16N, especially surface density distribution, was extracted using the modified Glauber model. On the basis of dilute surface densities, the discussion of 15N(n, {\gamma})16N reaction was performed within the framework of the direct capture reaction mechanism. The calculations agreed quite well with the experimental data.
  • In a general context of positive definite kernels $k$, we develop tools and algorithms for sampling in reproducing kernel Hilbert space $\mathscr{H}$ (RKHS). With reference to these RKHSs, our results allow inference from samples; more precisely, reconstruction of an "entire" (or global) signal, a function $f$ from $\mathscr{H}$, via generalized interpolation of $f$ from partial information obtained from carefully chosen distributions of sample points. We give necessary and sufficient conditions for configurations of point-masses $\delta_{x}$ of sample-points $x$ to have finite norm relative to the particular RKHS $\mathscr{H}$ considered. When this is the case, and the kernel $k$ is given, we obtain an induced positive definite kernel $\left\langle \delta_{x},\delta_{y}\right\rangle _{\mathscr{H}}$. We perform a comparison, and we study when this induced positive definite kernel has $l^{2}$ rows and columns. The latter task is accomplished with the use of certain symmetric pairs of operators in the two Hilbert spaces, $l^{2}$ on one side, and the RKHS $\mathscr{H}$ on the other. A number of applications are given, including to infinite network systems, to graph Laplacians, to resistance metrics, and to sampling of Gaussian fields.
  • We study a family of representations of the canonical commutation relations (CCR)-algebra (an infinite number of degrees of freedom), which we call admissible. The family of admissible representations includes the Fock-vacuum representation. We show that, to every admissible representation, there is an associated Gaussian stochastic calculus, and we point out that the case of the Fock-vacuum CCR-representation in a natural way yields the operators of Malliavin calculus. And we thus get the operators of Malliavin's calculus of variation from a more algebraic approach than is common. And we obtain explicit and natural formulas, and rules, for the operators of stochastic calculus. Our approach makes use of a notion of symmetric (closable) pairs of operators. The Fock-vacuum representation yields a maximal symmetric pair. This duality viewpoint has the further advantage that issues with unbounded operators and dense domains can be resolved much easier than what is possible with alternative tools. With the use of CCR representation theory, we also obtain, as a byproduct, a number of new results in multi-variable operator theory which we feel are of independent interest.
  • We study a family of discrete-time random-walk models. The starting point is a fixed generalized transfer operator $R$ subject to a set of axioms, and a given endomorphism in a compact Hausdorff space $X$. Our setup includes a host of models from applied dynamical systems, and it leads to general path-space probability realizations of the initial transfer operator. The analytic data in our construction is a pair $\left(h,\lambda\right)$, where $h$ is an $R$-harmonic function on $X$, and $\lambda$ is a given positive measure on $X$ subject to a certain invariance condition defined from $R$. With this we show that there are then discrete-time random-walk realizations in explicit path-space models; each associated to a probability measures $\mathbb{P}$ on path-space, in such a way that the initial data allows for spectral characterization: The initial endomorphism in $X$ lifts to an automorphism in path-space with the probability measure $\mathbb{P}$ quasi-invariant with respect to a shift automorphism. The latter takes the form of explicit multi-resolutions in $L^{2}$ of $\mathbb{P}$ in the sense of Lax-Phillips scattering theory.
  • Over the decades, Functional Analysis has been enriched and inspired on account of demands from neighboring fields, within mathematics, harmonic analysis (wavelets and signal processing), numerical analysis (finite element methods, discretization), PDEs (diffusion equations, scattering theory), representation theory; iterated function systems (fractals, Julia sets, chaotic dynamical systems), ergodic theory, operator algebras, and many more. And neighboring areas, probability/statistics (for example stochastic processes, Ito and Malliavin calculus), physics (representation of Lie groups, quantum field theory), and spectral theory for Schr\"odinger operators. We have strived for a more accessible book, and yet aimed squarely at applications; -- we have been serious about motivation: Rather than beginning with the four big theorems in Functional Analysis, our point of departure is an initial choice of topics from applications. And we have aimed for flexibility of use; acknowledging that students and instructors will invariably have a host of diverse goals in teaching beginning analysis courses. And students come to the course with a varied background. Indeed, over the years we found that students have come to the Functional Analysis sequence from other and different areas of math, and even from other departments; and so we have presented the material in a way that minimizes the need for prerequisites. We also found that well motivated students are easily able to fill in what is needed from measure theory, or from a facility with the four big theorems of Functional Analysis. And we found that the approach "learn-by-using" has a comparative advantage.
  • We study kernel functions, and associated reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces $\mathscr{H}$ over infinite, discrete and countable sets $V$. Numerical analysis builds discrete models (e.g., finite element) for the purpose of finding approximate solutions to boundary value problems; using multiresolution-subdivision schemes in continuous domains. In this paper, we turn the tables: our object of study is realistic infinite discrete models in their own right; and we then use an analysis of suitable continuous counterpart problems, but now serving as a tool for obtaining solutions in the discrete world.
  • Making use of a unified approach to certain classes of induced representations, we establish here a number of detailed spectral theoretic decomposition results. They apply to specific problems from non-commutative harmonic analysis, ergodic theory, and dynamical systems. Our analysis is in the setting of semidirect products, discrete subgroups, and solenoids. Our applications include analysis and ergodic theory of Bratteli diagrams and their compact duals; of wavelet sets, and wavelet representations.
  • We study two classes of extension problems, and their interconnections: (i) Extension of positive definite (p.d.) continuous functions defined on subsets in locally compact groups $G$; (ii) In case of Lie groups, representations of the associated Lie algebras $La\left(G\right)$ by unbounded skew-Hermitian operators acting in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) $\mathscr{H}_{F}$. Why extensions? In science, experimentalists frequently gather spectral data in cases when the observed data is limited, for example limited by the precision of instruments; or on account of a variety of other limiting external factors. Given this fact of life, it is both an art and a science to still produce solid conclusions from restricted or limited data. In a general sense, our monograph deals with the mathematics of extending some such given partial data-sets obtained from experiments. More specifically, we are concerned with the problems of extending available partial information, obtained, for example, from sampling. In our case, the limited information is a restriction, and the extension in turn is the full positive definite function (in a dual variable); so an extension if available will be an everywhere defined generating function for the exact probability distribution which reflects the data; if it were fully available. Such extensions of local information (in the form of positive definite functions) will in turn furnish us with spectral information. In this form, the problem becomes an operator extension problem, referring to operators in a suitable reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS). In our presentation we have stressed hands-on-examples. Extensions are almost never unique, and so we deal with both the question of existence, and if there are extensions, how they relate back to the initial completion problem.
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).
  • Understanding the surface and atmospheric conditions of Earth-size, rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of low-mass stars is currently one of the greatest astronomical endeavors. Knowledge of the planetary effective surface temperature alone is insufficient to accurately interpret biosignature gases when they are observed in the coming decades. The UV stellar spectrum drives and regulates the upper atmospheric heating and chemistry on Earth-like planets, is critical to the definition and interpretation of biosignature gases, and may even produce false-positives in our search for biologic activity. This white paper briefly describes the scientific motivation for panchromatic observations of exoplanetary systems as a whole (star and planet), argues that a future NASA UV/Vis/near-IR space observatory is well-suited to carry out this work, and describes technology development goals that can be achieved in the next decade to support the development of a UV/Vis/near-IR flagship mission in the 2020s.
  • For a given infinite connected graph $G=(V,E)$ and an arbitrary but fixed conductance function $c$, we study an associated graph Laplacian $\Delta_{c}$; it is a generalized difference operator where the differences are measured across the edges $E$ in $G$; and the conductance function $c$ represents the corresponding coefficients. The graph Laplacian (a key tool in the study of infinite networks) acts in an energy Hilbert space $\mathscr{H}_{E}$ computed from $c$. Using a certain Parseval frame, we study the spectral theoretic properties of graph Laplacians. In fact, for fixed $c$, there are two versions of the graph Laplacian, one defined naturally in the $l^{2}$ space of $V$, and the other in $\mathscr{H}_{E}$. The first is automatically selfadjoint, but the second involves a Krein extension. We prove that, as sets, the two spectra are the same, aside from the point 0. The point zero may be in the spectrum of the second, but not the first. We further study the fine structure of the respective spectra as the conductance function varies; showing now how the spectrum changes subject to variations in the function $c$.
  • We consider infinite weighted graphs $G$, i.e., sets of vertices $V$, and edges $E$ assumed countable infinite. An assignment of weights is a positive symmetric function $c$ on $E$ (the edge-set), conductance. From this, one naturally defines a reversible Markov process, and a corresponding Laplace operator acting on functions on $V$, voltage distributions. The harmonic functions are of special importance. We establish explicit boundary representations for the harmonic functions on $G$ of finite energy. We compute a resistance metric $d$ from a given conductance function. (The resistance distance $d(x,y)$ between two vertices $x$ and $y$ is the voltage drop from $x$ to $y$, which is induced by the given assignment of resistors when 1 amp is inserted at the vertex $x$, and then extracted again at $y$.) We study the class of models where this resistance metric is bounded. We show that then the finite-energy functions form an algebra of $\frac{1}{2}$-Lipschitz-continuous and bounded functions on $V$, relative to the metric $d$. We further show that, in this case, the metric completion $M$ of $(V,d)$ is automatically compact, and that the vertex-set $V$ is open in $M$. We obtain a Poisson boundary-representation for the harmonic functions of finite energy, and an interpolation formula for every function on $V$ of finite energy. We further compare $M$ to other compactifications; e.g., to certain path-space models.
  • A frame is a system of vectors $S$ in Hilbert space $\mathscr{H}$ with properties which allow one to write algorithms for the two operations, analysis and synthesis, relative to $S$, for all vectors in $\mathscr{H}$; expressed in norm-convergent series. Traditionally, frame properties are expressed in terms of an $S$-Gramian, $G_{S}$ (an infinite matrix with entries equal to the inner product of pairs of vectors in $S$); but still with strong restrictions on the given system of vectors in $S$, in order to guarantee frame-bounds. In this paper we remove these restrictions on $G_{S}$, and we obtain instead direct-integral analysis/synthesis formulas. We show that, in spectral subspaces of every finite interval $J$ in the positive half-line, there are associated standard frames, with frame-bounds equal the endpoints of $J$. Applications are given to reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, and to random fields.
  • Photochemical escape is an important process for oxygen escape from present Mars. In this work, a 1-D Monte-Carlo Model is developed to calculate escape rates of energetic oxygen atoms produced from O2+ dissociative recombination reactions (DR) under 1, 3, 10, and 20 times present solar XUV fluxes. We found that although the overall DR rates increase with solar XUV flux almost linearly, oxygen escape rate increases from 1 to 10 times present solar XUV conditions but decreases when increasing solar XUV flux further. Analysis shows that atomic species in the upper thermosphere of early Mars increases more rapidly than O2+ when increasing XUV fluxes. While the latter is the source of energetic O atoms, the former increases the collision probability and thus decreases the escape probability of energetic O. Our results suggest that photochemical escape be a less important escape mechanism than previously thought for the loss of water and/or CO2 from early Mars.