• We consider a coarse-grained (CG) model with pairwise interactions, suitable to describe low-density solutions of star-branched polymers of functionality $f$. Each macromolecule is represented by a CG molecule with $(f+1)$ interaction sites, which captures the star topology. Potentials are obtained by requiring the CG model to reproduce a set of distribution functions computed in the microscopic model in the zero-density limit. Explicit results are given for $f=6,12$ and $40$. We use the CG model to compute the osmotic equation of state of the solution for concentrations $c$ such that $\Phi_p = c/c^* \lesssim 1$, where $c^*$ is the overlap concentration. We also investigate in detail the phase diagram for f=40, identifying the boundaries of the solid intermediate phase. Finally, we investigate how the polymer size changes with $c$. For $\Phi_p\lesssim 0.3$ polymers become harder as $f$ increases at fixed reduced concentration $c/c^*$. On the other hand, for $\Phi_p\gtrsim 0.3$, polymers show the opposite behavior: At fixed $\Phi_p$, the larger the value of $f$, the larger their size reduction is.
  • We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.
  • We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of DNA designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves, and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures such as DNA origami which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na$^+$]=0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.