• The configuration of the three neutrino masses can take two forms, known as the normal and inverted hierarchies. We compute the Bayesian evidence associated with these two hierarchies. Previous studies found a mild preference for the normal hierarchy, and this was driven by the asymmetric manner in which cosmological data has confined the available parameter space. Here we identify the presence of a second asymmetry, which is imposed by data from neutrino oscillations. By combining constraints on the squared-mass splittings with the limit on the sum of neutrino masses of $\Sigma m_\nu < 0.13$ eV, and using a minimally informative prior on the masses, we infer odds of 42:1 in favour of the normal hierarchy, which is classified as "strong" in the Jeffreys' scale. We explore how these odds may evolve in light of higher precision cosmological data, and discuss the implications of this finding with regards to the nature of neutrinos. Finally the individual masses are inferred to be $m_1 = 3.80^{+26.2}_{-3.73} \, \text{meV}, m_2 = 8.8^{+18}_{-1.2} \, \text{meV}, m_3 = 50.4^{+5.8}_{-1.2} \, \text{meV}$ ($95\%$ credible intervals).
  • Should we expect most habitable planets to share the Earth's marbled appearance? For a planetary surface to boast extensive areas of both land and water, a delicate balance must be struck between the volume of water it retains and the capacity of its perturbations. These two quantities may show substantial variability across the full spectrum of water-bearing worlds. This would suggest that, barring strong feedback effects, most surfaces are heavily dominated by either water or land. Why is the Earth so finely poised? To address this question we construct a simple model for the selection bias that would arise within an ensemble of surface conditions. Based on the Earth's ocean coverage of 71%, we find substantial evidence (Bayes factor K ~ 6) supporting the hypothesis that anthropic selection effects are at work. Furthermore, due to the Earth's proximity to the waterworld limit, this model predicts that most habitable planets are dominated by oceans spanning over 90% of their surface area (95% credible interval). This scenario, in which the Earth has a much greater land area than most habitable planets, is consistent with results from numerical simulations and could help explain the apparently low-mass transition in the mass-radius relation.
  • Whether the fate of our species can be forecast from its past has been the topic of considerable controversy. One refutation of the so-called Doomsday Argument is based on the premise that we are more likely to exist in a universe containing a greater number of observers. Here we present a Bayesian reformulation of the Doomsday Argument which is immune to this effect. By marginalising over the spatial configuration of observers, we find that any preference for a larger total number of observers has no impact on the inferred local number. Our results remain unchanged when we adopt either the Self-Indexing Assumption (SIA) or the Self-Sampling Assumption (SSA). Furthermore the median value of our posterior distribution is found to be in agreement with the frequentist forecast. Humanity's prognosis for the coming century is well approximated by a global catastrophic risk of 0.2% per year.
  • Why did the emergence of our species require a timescale similar to the entire habitable period of our planet? Our late appearance has previously been interpreted by Carter (2008) as evidence that observers typically require a very long development time, implying that intelligent life is a rare occurrence. Here we present an alternative explanation, which simply asserts that many planets possess brief periods of habitability. We also propose that the rate-limiting step for the formation of observers is the enlargement of species from an initially microbial state. In this scenario the development of intelligent life is a slow but almost inevitable process, greatly enhancing the prospects of future SETI experiments such as the Breakthrough Listen project.
  • We demonstrate that a scalar field is unable to reverse its direction of motion while continuously exchanging energy with another fluid. If the rate of transfer is modulated by the scalar's acceleration, the field can undergo a rapid process of freezing, despite being displaced from the local minimum of its potential. This enables dark energy to form from any potential, regardless of its shape. The field's equation of state mimicks that of a cosmological constant. We present a physically motivated realisation in the form of a derivative neutrino-majoron coupling. Coherent motions, which form only once the neutrinos become non-relativistic, could be responsible for instigating the freezing process. This would provide a natural resolution to the dark energy coincidence problem, while avoiding the dynamical instabilities associated with mass-varying neutrino models. Finally we discuss possible means by which this model could be experimentally verified.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Persisting tensions between the cosmological constraints derived from low-redshift probes and the ones obtained from temperature and polarisation anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background -- although not yet providing compelling evidence against the $\Lambda $CDM model -- seem to consistently indicate a slower growth of density perturbations as compared to the predictions of the standard cosmological scenario. Such behavior is not easily accommodated by the simplest extensions of General Relativity, such as f(R) models, which generically predict an enhanced growth rate. In the present work we present the outcomes of a suite of large N-body simulations carried out in the context of a cosmological model featuring a non-vanishing scattering cross section between the dark matter and the dark energy fields, for two different parameterisations of the dark energy equation of state. Our results indicate that these Dark Scattering models have very mild effects on many observables related to large-scale structures formation and evolution, while providing a significant suppression of the amplitude of linear density perturbations and the abundance of massive clusters. Our simulations therefore confirm that these models offer a promising route to alleviate existing tensions between low-redshift measurements and those of the CMB.
  • Earth-like planets are expected to provide the greatest opportunity for the detection of life beyond the Solar System. However our planet cannot be considered a fair sample, especially if intelligent life exists elsewhere. Just as a person's country of origin is a biased sample among countries, so too their planet of origin may be a biased sample among planets. The magnitude of this effect can be substantial: over 98% of the world's population live in a country larger than the median. In the context of a simple model where the mean population density is invariant to planet size, we infer that a given inhabited planet (such as our nearest neighbour) has a radius $r<1.2 r_\oplus$ (95% confidence bound). We show that this result is likely to hold not only for planets hosting advanced life, but also for those which harbour primitive life forms. Further inferences may be drawn for any variable which influences population size. For example, since population density is widely observed to decline with increasing body mass, we conclude that most intelligent species are expected to exceed 300kg.
  • Galactic Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are copious sources of gamma-rays that can pose a threat to complex life. Using recent determinations of their rate and the probability of GRBs causing massive extinction, we explore what type of universes are most likely to harbour advanced forms of life. For this purpose we use cosmological N-body simulations to determine at what time and for what value of the cosmological constant ($\Lambda$) the chances of life being unaffected by cosmic explosions are maximised. We find that $\Lambda-$dominated universes favour the survival of life against GRBs. Within a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, the parameters that govern the likelihood of life survival to GRBs are dictated by the value of $\Lambda$ and the age of the Universe. We find that we seem to live in a favorable point in this parameter phase space which minimises the exposure to cosmic explosions, yet maximises the number of main sequence (hydrogen-burning) stars around which advanced life forms can exist.
  • We present the first cosmological measurement derived from a galaxy density field subject to a `clipping' transformation. By enforcing an upper bound on the galaxy number density field in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey (GAMA), contributions from the nonlinear processes of virialisation and galaxy bias are greatly reduced. This leads to a galaxy power spectrum which is easier to model, without calibration from numerical simulations. We develop a theoretical model for the power spectrum of a clipped field in redshift space, which is exact for the case of anisotropic Gaussian fields. Clipping is found to extend the applicability of the conventional Kaiser prescription by more than a factor of three in wavenumber, or a factor of thirty in terms of the number of Fourier modes. By modelling the galaxy power spectrum on scales k < 0.3 h/Mpc and density fluctuations $\delta_g < 4$ we measure the normalised growth rate $f\sigma_8(z = 0.18) = 0.29 \pm 0.10$.
  • Applying a transformation to a non-Gaussian field can enhance the information content of the resulting power spectrum, by reducing the correlations between Fourier modes. In the context of weak gravitational lensing, it has been shown that this gain in information content is significantly compromised by the presence of shape noise. We apply clipping to mock convergence fields, a technique which is known to be robust in the presence of noise and has been successfully applied to galaxy number density fields. When analysed in isolation the resulting convergence power spectrum returns degraded constraints on cosmological parameters. However substantial gains can be achieved by performing a combined analysis of the power spectra derived from both the original and transformed fields. Even in the presence of realistic levels of shape noise, we demonstrate that this approach is capable of reducing the area of likelihood contours within the $\Omega_m - \sigma_8$ plane by more than a factor of three.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Dark energy may be the first sign of new fundamental physics in the Universe, taking either a physical form or revealing a correction to Einsteinian gravity. Weak gravitational lensing and galaxy peculiar velocities provide complementary probes of General Relativity, and in combination allow us to test modified theories of gravity in a unique way. We perform such an analysis by combining measurements of cosmic shear tomography from the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) with the growth of structure from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and the Six-degree-Field Galaxy Survey (6dFGS), producing the strongest existing joint constraints on the metric potentials that describe general theories of gravity. For scale-independent modifications to the metric potentials which evolve linearly with the effective dark energy density, we find present-day cosmological deviations in the Newtonian potential and curvature potential from the prediction of General Relativity to be (Delta Psi)/Psi = 0.05 \pm 0.25 and (Delta Phi)/Phi = -0.05 \pm 0.3 respectively (68 per cent CL).
  • Viable modifications of gravity that may produce cosmic acceleration need to be screened in high-density regions such as the Solar System, where general relativity is well tested. Screening mechanisms also prevent strong anomalies in the large-scale structure and limit the constraints that can be inferred on these gravity models from cosmology. We find that by suppressing the contribution of the screened high-density regions in the matter power spectrum, allowing a greater contribution of unscreened low densities, modified gravity models can be more readily discriminated from the concordance cosmology. Moreover, by variation of density thresholds, degeneracies with other effects may be dealt with more adequately. Specializing to chameleon gravity as a worked example for screening in modified gravity, employing N-body simulations of f(R) models and the halo model of chameleon theories, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. We find that a percent-level measurement of the clipped power at k < 0.3 h/Mpc can yield constraints on chameleon models that are more stringent than what is inferred from Solar System tests or distance indicators in unscreened dwarf galaxies. Finally, we verify that our method is also applicable to the Vainshtein mechanism.
  • Low energy interactions between particles are often characterised by elastic scattering. Just as electrons undergo Thomson scattering with photons, dark matter particles may experience an analogous form of momentum exchange with dark energy. We investigate the influence such an interaction has on the formation of linear and nonlinear cosmic structure, by running for the first time a suite of N-body simulations with different dark energy equations of state and scattering cross sections. In models where the linear matter power spectrum is suppressed by the scattering, we find that on nonlinear scales the power spectrum is strongly enhanced. This is due to the friction term increasing the efficiency of gravitational collapse, which also leads to a scale-independent amplification of the concentration and mass functions of halos. The opposite trend is found for models characterised by an increase of the linear matter power spectrum normalisation. More quantitatively, we find that power spectrum deviations at nonlinear scales ($k \approx 10\, h/$Mpc) are roughly ten times larger than their linear counterparts, exceeding $100%$ for the largest value of the scattering cross section considered in the present work. Similarly, the concentration-mass relation and the halo mass function show deviations up to $100%$ and $20%$, respectively, over a wide range of masses. Therefore, we conclude that nonlinear probes of structure formation might provide much tighter constraints on the scattering cross section between dark energy and dark matter as compared to the present bounds based on linear observables.
  • We give an analytical form for the weighted correlation function of peaks in a Gaussian random field. In a cosmological context, this approach strictly describes the formation bias and is the main result here. Nevertheless, we show its validity and applicability to the evolved cosmological density field and halo field, using Gaussian random field realisations and dark matter N-body numerical simulations. Using this result from peak theory we compute the bias of peaks (and dark matter halos) and show that it reproduces results from the simulations at the ${\mathcal O}(10\%)$ level. Our analytical formula for the bias predicts a scale-dependent bias with two characteristics: a broad band shape which, however, is most affected by the choice of weighting scheme and evolution bias, and a more robust, narrow feature localised at the BAO scale, an effect that is confirmed in simulations. This scale-dependent bias smooths the BAO feature but, conveniently, does not move it. We provide a simple analytic formula to describe this effect. We envision that our analytic solution will be of use for galaxy surveys that exploit galaxy clustering.
  • We present a method for suppressing contributions from higher-order terms in perturbation theory, greatly increasing the amount of information which may be extracted from the matter power spectrum. In an evolved cosmological density field the highest density regions are responsible for the bulk of the nonlinear power. By suitably down-weighting these problematic regions we find that the one- and two-loop terms are typically reduced in amplitude by ~70 per cent and ~95 per cent respectively, relative to the linear power spectrum. This greatly facilitates modelling the shape of the galaxy power spectrum, potentially increasing the number of useful Fourier modes by more than two orders of magnitude. We provide a demonstration of how this technique allows the galaxy bias and the amplitude of linear matter perturbations sigma_8 to be determined from the power spectrum on conventionally nonlinear scales, 0.1<k<0.7 h/Mpc.
  • We present a finely-binned tomographic weak lensing analysis of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, CFHTLenS, mitigating contamination to the signal from the presence of intrinsic galaxy alignments via the simultaneous fit of a cosmological model and an intrinsic alignment model. CFHTLenS spans 154 square degrees in five optical bands, with accurate shear and photometric redshifts for a galaxy sample with a median redshift of zm =0.70. We estimate the 21 sets of cosmic shear correlation functions associated with six redshift bins, each spanning the angular range of 1.5<theta<35 arcmin. We combine this CFHTLenS data with auxiliary cosmological probes: the cosmic microwave background with data from WMAP7, baryon acoustic oscillations with data from BOSS, and a prior on the Hubble constant from the HST distance ladder. This leads to constraints on the normalisation of the matter power spectrum sigma_8 = 0.799 +/- 0.015 and the matter density parameter Omega_m = 0.271 +/- 0.010 for a flat Lambda CDM cosmology. For a flat wCDM cosmology we constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w = -1.02 +/- 0.09. We also provide constraints for curved Lambda CDM and wCDM cosmologies. We find the intrinsic alignment contamination to be galaxy-type dependent with a significant intrinsic alignment signal found for early-type galaxies, in contrast to the late-type galaxy sample for which the intrinsic alignment signal is found to be consistent with zero.
  • We present cosmological constraints from 2D weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) which spans 154 square degrees in five optical bands. Using accurate photometric redshifts and measured shapes for 4.2 million galaxies between redshifts of 0.2 and 1.3, we compute the 2D cosmic shear correlation function over angular scales ranging between 0.8 and 350 arcmin. Using non-linear models of the dark-matter power spectrum, we constrain cosmological parameters by exploring the parameter space with Population Monte Carlo sampling. The best constraints from lensing alone are obtained for the small-scale density-fluctuations amplitude sigma_8 scaled with the total matter density Omega_m. For a flat LambdaCDM model we obtain sigma_8(Omega_m/0.27)^0.6 = 0.79+-0.03. We combine the CFHTLenS data with WMAP7, BOSS and an HST distance-ladder prior on the Hubble constant to get joint constraints. For a flat LambdaCDM model, we find Omega_m = 0.283+-0.010 and sigma_8 = 0.813+-0.014. In the case of a curved wCDM universe, we obtain Omega_m = 0.27+-0.03, sigma_8 = 0.83+-0.04, w_0 = -1.10+-0.15 and Omega_K = 0.006+0.006-0.004. We calculate the Bayesian evidence to compare flat and curved LambdaCDM and dark-energy CDM models. From the combination of all four probes, we find models with curvature to be at moderately disfavoured with respect to the flat case. A simple dark-energy model is indistinguishable from LambdaCDM. Our results therefore do not necessitate any deviations from the standard cosmological model.
  • The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) comprises deep multi-colour (u*g'r'i'z') photometry spanning 154 square degrees, with accurate photometric redshifts and shape measurements. We demonstrate that the redshift probability distribution function summed over galaxies provides an accurate representation of the galaxy redshift distribution accounting for random and catastrophic errors for galaxies with best fitting photometric redshifts z_p < 1.3. We present cosmological constraints using tomographic weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure. We use two broad redshift bins 0.5 < z_p <= 0.85 and 0.85 < z_p <= 1.3 free of intrinsic alignment contamination, and measure the shear correlation function on angular scales in the range ~1-40 arcmin. We show that the problematic redshift scaling of the shear signal, found in previous CFHTLS data analyses, does not afflict the CFHTLenS data. For a flat Lambda-CDM model and a fixed matter density Omega_m=0.27, we find the normalisation of the matter power spectrum sigma_8=0.771 \pm 0.041. When combined with cosmic microwave background data (WMAP7), baryon acoustic oscillation data (BOSS), and a prior on the Hubble constant from the HST distance ladder, we find that CFHTLenS improves the precision of the fully marginalised parameter estimates by an average factor of 1.5-2. Combining our results with the above cosmological probes, we find Omega_m=0.2762 \pm 0.0074 and sigma_8=0.802 \pm 0.013.
  • A large fraction of the information collected by cosmological surveys is simply discarded to avoid lengthscales which are difficult to model theoretically. We introduce a new technique which enables the extraction of useful information from the bispectrum of galaxies well beyond the conventional limits of perturbation theory. Our results strongly suggest that this method increases the range of scales where the relation between the bispectrum and power spectrum in tree-level perturbation theory may be applied, from k_max ~ 0.1 h/Mpc to ~ 0.7 h/Mpc. This leads to correspondingly large improvements in the determination of galaxy bias. Since the clipped matter power spectrum closely follows the linear power spectrum, there is the potential to use this technique to probe the growth rate of linear perturbations and confront theories of modified gravity with observation.
  • We demonstrate how the two dominant constituents of the Universe, dark energy and dark matter, could possess a large scattering cross-section without considerably impacting observations. Unlike models involving energy exchange between the two fluids, the background cosmology remains unaltered, leaving fewer observational signatures. Following a brief review of the scattering cross-sections between cosmologically significant particles, we explore the implications of an elastic interaction between dark matter and dark energy. The growth of large scale structure is suppressed, yet this effect is found to be weak due to the persistently low dark energy density. Thus we conclude that the dark matter-dark energy cross section may exceed the Thomson cross-section by several orders of magnitude.
  • By relaxing the conventional assumption of a purely gravitational interaction between dark energy and dark matter, substantial alterations to the growth of cosmological structure can occur. In this work we focus on the homogeneous transfer of energy from a decaying form of dark energy. We present simple analytic solutions to the modified growth rates of matter fluctuations in these models, and demonstrate that neglecting physics within the dark sector may induce a significant bias in the inferred growth rate, potentially offering a false signature of modified gravity.
  • The bulk motion of galaxies induced by the growth of cosmic structure offers a rare opportunity to test the validity of general relativity across cosmological scales. However, modified gravity can be degenerate in its effect with the unknown values of cosmological parameters. More seriously, even the `observed' value of the RSD (redshift-space distortions) used to measure the fluctuation growth rate depends on the assumed cosmological parameters (the Alcock-Paczynski effect). We give a full analysis of these issues, showing how to combine RSD with BAO (baryon acoustic oscillations) and CMB (Cosmic Microwave Background) data, in order to obtain joint constraints on deviations from general relativity and on the equation of state of dark energy whilst allowing for factors such as non-zero curvature. In particular we note that the evolution of Omega_m(z), along with the Alcock-Paczynski effect, produces a degeneracy between the equation of state w and the modified growth parameter gamma. Typically, the total marginalized error on either of these parameters will be larger by a factor ~ 2 compared to the conditional error where one or other is held fixed. We argue that future missions should be judged by their Figure of Merit as defined in the w_p - gamma plane, and note that the inclusion of spatial curvature can degrade this value by an order of magnitude.
  • We explore potential strategies for testing General Relativity via the coherent motions of galaxies. Our position at z=0 provides the reference point for distance measures in cosmology. By contrast, the Cosmic Microwave Background at z ~ 1100 acts as the point of reference for the growth of large scale structure. As a result, we find there is a lack of synergy between growth and distance measures. We show that when measuring the gravitational growth index gamma using redshift-space distortions, typically 80% of the signal corresponds to the local growth rate at the galaxy bin location, while the remaining fraction is determined by its behaviour at higher redshifts. In order to clarify whether modified gravity may be responsible for the dark energy phenomenon, the aim is to search for a modification to the growth of structure. One might expect the magnitude of this deviation to be commensurate with the apparent dark energy density Omega_Lambda(z). This provides an incentive to study redshift-space distortions (RSD) at as low a redshift as is practical. Specifically, we find the region around z = 0.5 offers the optimal balance of available volume and signal strength.