• We present a suite of six fully cosmological, three-dimensional simulations of the collapse of an atomic cooling halo in the early Universe. We use the moving-mesh code arepo with an improved primordial chemistry network to evolve the hydrodynamical and chemical equations. The addition of a strong Lyman-Werner background suppresses molecular hydrogen cooling and permits the gas to evolve nearly isothermally at a temperature of about 8000 K. Strong gravitational torques effectively remove angular momentum and lead to the central collapse of gas, forming a supermassive protostar at the center of the halo. We model the protostar using two methods: sink particles that grow through mergers with other sink particles, and a stiff equation of state that leads to the formation of an adiabatic core. We impose threshold densities of $10^8$, $10^{10}$, and $10^{12}\,\text{cm}^{-3}$ for the sink particle formation and the onset of the stiff equation of state to study the late, intermediate, and early stages in the evolution of the protostar, respectively. We follow its growth from masses $\simeq 10\,\text{M}_\odot$ to $\simeq 10^5\,\text{M}_\odot$, with an average accretion rate of $\langle\dot{M}_\star\rangle \simeq 2\,\text{M}_\odot\,\text{yr}^{-1}$ for sink particles, and $\simeq 0.8 - 1.4\,\text{M}_\odot\,\text{yr}^{-1}$ for the adiabatic cores. At the end of the simulations, the HII region generated by radiation from the central object has long detached from the protostellar photosphere, but the ionizing radiation remains trapped in the inner host halo, and has thus not yet escaped into the intergalactic medium. Fully coupled, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations hold the key for further progress.
  • We present a model for the evolution of supermassive protostars from their formation at $M_\star \simeq 0.1\,\text{M}_\odot$ until their growth to $M_\star \simeq 10^5\,\text{M}_\odot$. To calculate the initial properties of the object in the optically thick regime we follow two approaches: based on idealized thermodynamic considerations, and on a more detailed one-zone model. Both methods derive a similar value of $n_{\rm F} \simeq 2 \times 10^{17} \,\text{cm}^{-3}$ for the density of the object when opacity becomes important, i.e. the opacity limit. The subsequent evolution of the growing protostar is determined by the accretion of gas onto the object and can be described by a mass-radius relation of the form $R_\star \propto M_\star^{1/3}$ during the early stages, and of the form $R_\star \propto M_\star^{1/2}$ when internal luminosity becomes important. For the case of a supermassive protostar, this implies that the radius of the star grows from $R_\star \simeq 0.65 \,{\rm AU}$ to $R_\star \simeq 250 \,{\rm AU}$ during its evolution. Finally, we use this model to construct a sub-grid recipe for accreting sink particles in numerical simulations. A prime ingredient thereof is a physically motivated prescription for the accretion radius and the effective temperature of the growing protostar embedded inside it. From the latter, we can conclude that photo-ionization feedback can be neglected until very late in the assembly process of the supermassive object.
  • We perform a post-processing radiative feedback analysis on a 3D ab initio cosmological simulation of an atomic cooling halo under the direct collapse black hole (DCBH) scenario. We maintain the spatial resolution of the simulation by incorporating native ray-tracing on unstructured mesh data, including Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha (Ly{\alpha}) radiative transfer. DCBHs are born in gas-rich, metal-poor environments with the possibility of Compton-thick conditions, $N_H \gtrsim 10^{24} {\rm cm}^{-2}$. Therefore, the surrounding gas is capable of experiencing the full impact of the bottled-up radiation pressure. In particular, we find that multiple scattering of Ly{\alpha} photons provides an important source of mechanical feedback after the gas in the sub-parsec region becomes partially ionized, avoiding the bottleneck of destruction via the two-photon emission mechanism. We provide detailed discussion of the simulation environment, expansion of the ionization front, emission and escape of Ly{\alpha} radiation, and Compton scattering. A sink particle prescription allows us to extract approximate limits on the post-formation evolution of the radiative feedback. Fully coupled Ly{\alpha} radiation hydrodynamics will be crucial to consider in future DCBH simulations.
  • We study the star formation process at galactic scales and the role of rotation through numerical simulations of spiral and starburst galaxies using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo. We focus on the study of three integrated star formation laws found in the literature: the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) and Silk-Elmegreen (SE) laws, and the dimensionally homogeneous equation proposed by Escala (2015) $\Sigma_{\rm SFR} \propto \sqrt{G/L}\Sigma_{\rm gas}^{1.5}$. We show that using the last we take into account the effects of the integration along the line of sight and find a unique regime of star formation for both types of galaxies, suppressing the observed bi-modality of the KS law. We find that the efficiencies displayed by our simulations are anti-correlated with the angular velocity of the disk $\Omega$ for the three laws studied in this work. Finally, we show that the dimensionless efficiency of star formation is well represented by an exponentially decreasing function of $-1.9\Omega t_{\rm ff}^{\rm ini}$, where $t_{\rm ff}^{\rm ini}$ is the initial free-fall time. This leads to a unique galactic star formation relation which reduces the scatter of the bi-modal KS, SE, and Escala (2015) relations by 43%, 43%, and 35% respectively.
  • We present the highest-resolution three-dimensional simulation to date of the collapse of an atomic cooling halo in the early Universe. We use the moving-mesh code arepo with the primordial chemistry module introduced in Greif (2014), which evolves the chemical and thermal rate equations for over more than 20 orders of magnitude in density. Molecular hydrogen cooling is suppressed by a strong Lyman-Werner background, which facilitates the near-isothermal collapse of the gas at a temperature of about $10^4\,$K. Once the central gas cloud becomes optically thick to continuum emission, it settles into a Keplerian disc around the primary protostar. The initial mass of the protostar is about $0.1\,{\rm M}_\odot$, which is an order of magnitude higher than in minihaloes that cool via molecular hydrogen. The high accretion rate and efficient cooling of the gas catalyse the fragmentation of the disc into a small protostellar system with 5-10 members. After about 12 yr, strong gravitational interactions disrupt the disc and temporarily eject the primary protostar from the centre of the cloud. By the end of the simulation, a secondary clump has collapsed at a distance of $\simeq 150\,$au from the primary clump. If this clump undergoes a similar evolution as the first, the central gas cloud may evolve into a wide binary system. High accretion rates of both the primary and secondary clumps suggest that fragmentation is not a significant barrier for forming at least one massive black hole seed.
  • We use the Adaptive Mesh Refinement code Enzo to model the interstellar medium in isolated local disk galaxies. The simulation includes a treatment for star formation and stellar feedback. We get a highly supersonic turbulent disk, which is fragmented at multiple scales and characterized by a multi-phase interstellar medium. We show that a Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation only holds when averaging over large scales. However, values of star formation rates and gas surface densities lie close in the plot for any averaging size. This suggests an intrinsic relation between stars and gas at cell-size scales, which dominates over the global dynamical evolution. To investigate this effect, we develop a method to simulate the creation of stars based on the density field from the snapshots, without running the code again. We also investigate how the star formation law is affected by the characteristic star formation timescale, the density threshold and the efficiency considered in the recipe. We find that the slope of the law might vary from ~1.4 for a free-fall timescale, to ~1.0 for a constant depletion timescale. We further demonstrate that a power-law is recovered just by assuming that the mass of the new stars is a fraction of the mass of the cell $m_\star=\epsilon\rho_{\rm gas}\Delta x^3$, with no other physical criteria required. We show that both efficiency and density threshold do not affect the slope, but the right combination of them can adjust the normalization of the relation, which in turn could explain a possible bi-modality in the law.
  • We study the gravitational stability of gaseous streams in the complex environment of a galaxy merger, because mergers are known to be places of ongoing massive cluster formation and bursts of star formation. We find an analytic stability parameter for case of gaseous streams orbiting around the merger remnant. We test our stability criteria using hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers, obtaining satisfactory results. We find that our criteria successfully predicts the streams that will be gravitationally unstable to fragment into clumps.