• We present the first study of an Iwasawa-Taniguchi/X-ray Baldwin effect for Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGN). We report a statistically significant anti-correlation between the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) of the narrow core of the neutral Fe K$\alpha$ fluorescence emission line, ubiquitously observed in the reflection spectra of obscured AGN, and the mid-infrared 12$\,\mu$m continuum luminosity (taken as a proxy for the bolometric AGN luminosity). Our sample consists of 72 Compton-thick AGN selected from pointed and deep-field observations covering a redshift range of $z\sim0.0014-3.7$. We employ a Monte Carlo-based fitting method, which returns a Spearman's Rank correlation coefficient of $\rho=-0.28\pm0.12$, significant to 98.7% confidence. The best fit found is ${\rm log}({\rm EW}_{{\rm Fe\,K}\alpha})\,\propto\,-0.08\pm0.04\,{\rm log}(L_{12\,\mu{\rm m}})$, which is consistent with multiple studies of the X-ray Baldwin effect for unobscured and mildly obscured AGN. This is an unexpected result, as the Fe K$\alpha$ line is conventionally thought to originate from the same region as the underlying reflection continuum, which together constitute the reflection spectrum. We discuss the implications this could have if confirmed on larger samples, including a systematic underestimation of the line of sight X-ray obscuring column density and hence the intrinsic luminosities and growth rates for the most luminous AGN.
  • We present the first catalog and data release of the Swift-BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS). We analyze optical spectra of the majority of AGN (77%, 641/836) detected based on their 14-195 keV emission in the 70-month Swift BAT all-sky catalog. This includes redshift determination, absorption and emission line measurements, and black hole mass and accretion rate estimates for the majority of obscured and un-obscured AGN (74%, 473/641) with 340 measured for the first time. With ~90% of sources at z<0.2, the survey represents a significant census of hard-X-ray selected AGN in the local universe. In this first catalog paper, we describe the spectroscopic observations and datasets, and our initial spectral analysis. The FWHM of the emission lines show broad agreement with the X-ray obscuration (~94%), such that Sy 1-1.8 have NH<10^21.9 cm^-2, and Seyfert 2, have NH>10^21.9 cm^-2. Seyfert 1.9 show a range of column densities. Compared to narrow line AGN in the SDSS, the X-ray selected AGN have a larger fraction of dusty host galaxies suggesting these types of AGN are missed in optical surveys. Using the most sensitive [OIII]/Hbeta and [NII]/Halpha emission line diagnostic, about half of the sources are classified as Seyferts, ~15% reside in dusty galaxies that lack an Hbeta detection, but for which the line upper limits imply either a Seyfert or LINER, ~15% are in galaxies with weak or no emission lines despite high quality spectra, and a few percent each are LINERS, composite galaxies, HII regions, or in known beamed AGN.
  • We study the observed relation between accretion rate (in terms of L/L_Edd) and shape of the hard X-ray spectral energy distribution (namely the photon index Gamma_X) for a large sample of 228 hard X-ray selected, low-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGN), drawn from the Swift/BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS). This includes 30 AGN for which black hole mass (and therefore L/L_Edd) is measured directly through masers, spatially resolved gas or stellar dynamics, or reverberation mapping. The high quality and broad energy coverage of the data provided through BASS allow us to examine several alternative determinations of both Gamma_X and L/L_Edd. For the BASS sample as a whole, we find a statistically significant, albeit very weak correlation between Gamma_X and L/L_Edd. The best-fitting relations we find, Gamma_X=0.15 log(L/L_Edd)+const., are considerably shallower than those reported in previous studies. Moreover, we find no corresponding correlations among the subsets of AGN with different M_BH determination methodology. In particular, we find no robust evidence for a correlation when considering only those AGN with direct or single-epoch M_BH estimates. This latter finding is in contrast to several previous studies which focused on z>0.5 broad-line AGN. We discuss this tension and conclude that it can be partially accounted for if one adopts a simplified, power-law X-ray spectral model, combined with L/L_Edd estimates that are based on the continuum emission and on single-epoch broad line spectroscopy in the optical regime. We finally highlight the limitations on using Gamma_X as a probe of supermassive black hole evolution in deep extragalactic X-ray surveys.
  • The relativistic jets created by some active galactic nuclei are important agents of AGN feedback. In spite of this, our understanding of what produces these jets is still incomplete. X-ray observations, which can probe the processes operating in the central regions in immediate vicinity of the supermassive black hole, the presumed jet launching point, are potentially particularly valuable in illuminating the jet formation process. Here, we present the hard X-ray NuSTAR observations of the radio-loud quasar 4C 74.26 in a joint analysis with quasi-simultaneous, soft X-ray Swift observations. Our spectral analysis reveals a high-energy cut-off of 183$_{-35}^{+51}$ keV and confirms the presence of ionized reflection in the source. From the average spectrum we detect that the accretion disk is mildly recessed with an inner radius of $R_\mathrm{in}=4-180\,R_\mathrm{g}$. However, no significant evolution of the inner radius is seen during the three months covered by our NuSTAR campaign. This lack of variation could mean that the jet formation in this radio-loud quasar differs from what is observed in broad-line radio galaxies.
  • We provide a comprehensive census of the near-Infrared (NIR, 0.8-2.4 $\mu$m) spectroscopic properties of 102 nearby (z < 0.075) active galactic nuclei (AGN), selected in the hard X-ray band (14-195 keV) from the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey. With the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope this regime is of increasing importance for dusty and obscured AGN surveys. We measure black hole masses in 68% (69/102) of the sample using broad emission lines (34/102) and/or the velocity dispersion of the Ca II triplet or the CO band-heads (46/102). We find that emission line diagnostics in the NIR are ineffective at identifying bright, nearby AGN galaxies because ([Fe II] 1.257$\mu$m/Pa$\beta$ and H$_2$ 2.12$\mu$m/Br$\gamma$) identify only 25% (25/102) as AGN with significant overlap with star forming galaxies and only 20% of Seyfert 2 have detected coronal lines (6/30). We measure the coronal line emission in Seyfert 2 to be weaker than in Seyfert 1 of the same bolometric luminosity suggesting obscuration by the nuclear torus. We find that the correlation between the hard X-ray and the [Si VI] coronal line luminosity is significantly better than with the [O III] luminosity. Finally, we find 3/29 galaxies (10%) that are optically classified as Seyfert 2 show broad emission lines in the NIR. These AGN have the lowest levels of obscuration among the Seyfert 2s in our sample ($\log N_{\rm H} < 22.43$ cm$^{-2}$), and all show signs of galaxy-scale interactions or mergers suggesting that the optical broad emission lines are obscured by host galaxy dust.
  • We investigate the observed relationship between black hole mass ($M_{\rm BH}$), bolometric luminosity ($L_{\rm bol}$), and Eddington ratio (${\lambda}_{\rm Edd}$) with optical emission line ratios ([NII] {\lambda}6583/H{\alpha}, [SII] {\lambda}{\lambda}6716,6731/H{\alpha}, [OI] {\lambda}6300/H{\alpha}, [OIII] {\lambda}5007/H{\beta}, [NeIII] {\lambda}3869/H{\beta}, and HeII {\lambda}4686/H{\beta}) of hard X-ray-selected AGN from the BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS). We show that the [NII] {\lambda}6583/H{\alpha} ratio exhibits a significant correlation with ${\lambda}_{\rm Edd}$ ($R_{\rm Pear}$ = -0.44, $p$-value=$3\times10^{-13}$, {\sigma} = 0.28 dex), and the correlation is not solely driven by $M_{\rm BH}$ or $L_{\rm bol}$. The observed correlation between [NII] {\lambda}6583/H{\alpha} ratio and $M_{\rm BH}$ is stronger than the correlation with $L_{\rm bol}$, but both are weaker than the ${\lambda}_{\rm Edd}$ correlation. This implies that the large-scale narrow lines of AGN host galaxies carry information about the accretion state of the AGN central engine. We propose that the [NII] {\lambda}6583/H{\alpha} is a useful indicator of Eddington ratio with 0.6 dex of rms scatter, and that it can be used to measure ${\lambda}_{\rm Edd}$ and thus $M_{\rm BH}$ from the measured $L_{\rm bol}$, even for high redshift obscured AGN. We briefly discuss possible physical mechanisms behind this correlation, such as the mass-metallicity relation, X-ray heating, and radiatively driven outflows.
  • We study the geometry of the AGN obscurer in IRAS 09104+4109, an IR-luminous, radio-intermediate FR-I source at $z=0.442$, using infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, X-ray data from Nustar, Swift, Suzaku, and Chandra, and an optical spectrum from Palomar. The infrared data imply a total rest-frame 1-1000$\mu$m luminosity of $5.5\times10^{46}$erg s$^{-1}$ and require both an AGN torus and starburst model. The AGN torus has an anisotropy-corrected IR luminosity of $4.9\times10^{46}$erg s$^{-1}$, and a viewing angle and half opening angle both of approximately $36$ degrees from pole-on. The starburst has a star formation rate of $(110\pm34)$M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and an age of $<50$Myr. These results are consistent with two epochs of luminous activity in 09104: one approximately $150$Myr ago, and one ongoing. The X-ray data suggest a photon index of $\Gamma \simeq 1.8$ and a line-of-sight column of $N_{\rm H} \simeq 5\times10^{23}$cm$^{-2}$. This argues against a reflection-dominated hard X-ray spectrum, which would have implied a much higher $N_{\rm H}$ and luminosity. The X-ray and infrared data are consistent with a bolometric AGN luminosity of $L_{\rm bol}\sim(0.5-2.5)\times10^{47}$erg s$^{-1}$. The X-ray and infrared data are further consistent with coaligned AGN obscurers in which the line of sight "skims" the torus. This is also consistent with the optical spectra, which show both coronal iron lines and broad lines in polarized but not direct light. Combining constraints from the X-ray, optical, and infrared data suggests that the AGN obscurer is within a vertical height of $20$pc, and a radius of $125$pc, of the nucleus.
  • We present the results of a joint Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy campaign on M31. We focus on the five brightest globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields. Two of these had previously been argued to be black hole candidates on the basis of apparent hard-state spectra at luminosities above those for which neutron stars are in hard states. We show that these two sources are likely to be Z-sources (i.e. low magnetic field neutron stars accreting near their Eddington limits), or perhaps bright atoll sources (low magnetic field neutron stars which are just a bit fainter than this level) on the basis of simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR spectra which cover a broader range of energies. These new observations reveal spectral curvature above 6-8 keV that would be hard to detect without the broader energy coverage the NuSTAR data provide relative to Chandra and XMM-Newton. We show that the other three sources are also likely to be bright neutron star X-ray binaries, rather than black hole X-ray binaries. We discuss why it should already have been realized that it was unlikely that these objects were black holes on the basis of their being persistent sources, and we re-examine past work which suggested that tidal capture products would be persistently bright X-ray emitters. We discuss how this problem is likely due to neglecting disk winds in older work that predict which systems will be persistent and which will be transient.
  • We present a multi-epoch X-ray spectral analysis of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Fairall 9. Our analysis shows that Fairall 9 displays unique spectral variability in that its ratio residuals to a simple absorbed power law in the 0.5-10 keV band remain constant with time in spite of large variations in flux. This behavior implies an unchanging source geometry and the same emission processes continuously at work at the timescale probed. With the constraints from NuSTAR on the broad-band spectral shape, it is clear that the soft excess in this source is a superposition of two different processes, one being blurred ionized reflection in the innermost parts of the accretion disk, and the other a continuum component such as spatially distinct Comptonizing region. Alternatively, a more complex primary Comptonization component together with blurred ionized reflection could be responsible.
  • Some reddened quasars appear to be transitional objects in the merger-induced black hole growth/galaxy evolution paradigm, where a heavily obscured nucleus starts to be unveiled by powerful quasar winds evacuating the surrounding cocoon of dust and gas. Hard X-ray observations are able to peer through this gas and dust, revealing the properties of circumnuclear obscuration. Here, we present NuSTAR and XMM-Newton/Chandra observations of FIRST-2MASS selected red quasars F2M 0830+3759 and F2M 1227+3214. We find that though F2M 0830+3759 is moderately obscured ($N_{\rm H,Z} = 2.1\pm0.2 \times10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) and F2M 1227+3214 is mildly absorbed ($N_{\rm H,Z} = 3.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$) along the line-of-sight, heavier global obscuration may be present in both sources, with $N_{\rm H,S} = 3.7^{+4.1}_{-2.6} \times 10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $< 5.5\times10^{23}$ cm$^{-2}$, for F2M 0830+3759 and F2M 1227+3214, respectively. F2M 0830+3759 also has an excess of soft X-ray emission below 1 keV which is well accommodated by a model where 7% of the intrinsic AGN X-ray emission is scattered into the line-of-sight. While F2M 1227+3214 has a dust-to-gas ratio ($E(B-V)$/$N_{\rm H}$) consistent with the Galactic value, the $E(B-V)$/$N_{\rm H}$ value for F2M 0830+3759 is lower than the Galactic standard, consistent with the paradigm that the dust resides on galactic scales while the X-ray reprocessing gas originates within the dust-sublimation zone of the broad-line-region. The X-ray and 6.1$\mu$m luminosities of these red quasars are consistent with the empirical relations derived for high-luminosity, unobscured quasars, extending the parameter space of obscured AGN previously observed by NuSTAR to higher luminosities.
  • The recent discovery by Bachetti et al. (2014) of a pulsar in M82 that can reach luminosities of up to 10^40 ergs s^-1, a factor of ~100 the Eddington luminosity for a 1.4 Msol compact object, poses a challenge for accretion physics. In order to better understand the nature of this source and its duty cycle, and in the light of several physical models that have been subsequently published, we conduct a spectral and temporal analysis of the 0.5-8 keV X-ray emission from this source from 15 years of Chandra observations. We fit the Chandra spectra of the pulsar with a power-law model and a disk black body model, subjected to interstellar absorption in M82. We carefully assess for the effect of pile-up in our observations, where 4/19 observations have a pile-up fraction >10%, which we account for during spectral modeling with a convolution model. When fitted with a power-law model, the average photon index when the source is at high luminosity (L_X>10^39 ergs s^-1) is Gamma=1.33+/-0.15. For the disk black body model, the average temperature is T=3.24+/-0.65 keV, consistent with other luminous X-ray pulsars. We also investigated the inclusion of a soft excess component and spectral break, finding that the spectra are also consistent with these features common to luminous X-ray pulsars. In addition, we present spectral analysis from NuSTAR over the 3-50 keV range where we have isolated the pulsed component. We find that the pulsed emission in this band is best fit by a power-law with a high-energy cut-off, where Gamma=0.6+/-0.3 and E_C=14^{+5}_{-3} keV. While the pulsar has previously been identified as a transient, we find from our longer-baseline study that it has been remarkably active over the 15-year period, where for 9/19 (47%) observations that we analyzed, the pulsar appears to be emitting at a luminosity in excess of 10^39 ergs s^-1, greater than 10 times its Eddington limit.
  • We present the results from a joint Suzaku/NuSTAR broad-band spectral analysis of 3C 390.3. The high quality data enables us to clearly separate the primary continuum from the reprocessed components allowing us to detect a high energy spectral cut-off ($E_\text{cut}=117_{-14}^{+18}$ keV), and to place constraints on the Comptonization parameters of the primary continuum for the first time. The hard over soft compactness is 69$_{-24}^{+124}$ and the optical depth 4.1$_{-3.6}^{+0.5}$, this leads to an electron temperature of $30_{-8}^{+32}$ keV. Expanding our study of the Comptonization spectrum to the optical/UV by studying the simultaneous Swift-UVOT data, we find indications that the compactness of the corona allows only a small fraction of the total UV/optical flux to be Comptonized. Our analysis of the reprocessed emission show that 3C 390.3 only has a small amount of reflection (R~0.3), and of that the vast majority is from distant neutral matter. However we also discover a soft X-ray excess in the source, which can be described by a weak ionized reflection component from the inner parts of the accretion disk. In addition to the backscattered emission, we also detect the highly ionized iron emission lines Fe XXV and Fe XXVI.
  • We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (14-195 keV) with a [OIII] large scatter (R_Pear = 0.64, sigma = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear=0.63, sigma = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low ionization lines (Halpha, [SII]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (sigma = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical differences in the scattering of the ionized gas or long term AGN variability are important.
  • Warren Skidmore, Ian Dell'Antonio, Misato Fukugawa, Aruna Goswami, Lei Hao, David Jewitt, Greg Laughlin, Charles Steidel, Paul Hickson, Luc Simard, Matthias Schöck, Tommaso Treu, Judith Cohen, G.C. Anupama, Mark Dickinson, Fiona Harrison, Tadayuki Kodama, Jessica R. Lu, Bruce Macintosh, Matt Malkan, Shude Mao, Norio Narita, Tomohiko Sekiguchi, Annapurni Subramaniam, Masaomi Tanaka, Feng Tian, Michael A'Hearn, Masayuki Akiyama, Babar Ali, Wako Aoki, Manjari Bagchi, Aaron Barth, Varun Bhalerao, Marusa Bradac, James Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, Scott Chapman, Ranga-Ram Chary, Masashi Chiba, Michael Cooper, Asantha Cooray, Ian Crossfield, Thayne Currie, Mousumi Das, G.C. Dewangan, Richard de Grijs, Tuan Do, Subo Dong, Jarah Evslin, Taotao Fang, Xuan Fang, Christopher Fassnacht, Leigh Fletcher, Eric Gaidos, Roy Gal, Andrea Ghez, Mauro Giavalisco, Carol A. Grady, Thomas Greathouse, Rupjyoti Gogoi, Puragra Guhathakurta, Luis Ho, Priya Hasan, Gregory J. Herczeg, Mitsuhiko Honda, Masa Imanishi, Hanae Inami, Masanori Iye, Jason Kalirai, U.S. Kamath, Stephen Kane, Nobunari Kashikawa, Mansi Kasliwal, Vishal Kasliwal, Evan Kirby, Quinn M. Konopacky, Sebastien Lepine, Di Li, Jianyang Li, Junjun Liu, Michael C. Liu, Enrigue Lopez-Rodriguez, Jennifer Lotz, Philip Lubin, Lucas Macri, Keiichi Maeda, Franck Marchis, Christian Marois, Alan Marscher, Crystal Martin, Taro Matsuo, Claire Max, Alan McConnachie, Stacy McGough, Carl Melis, Leo Meyer, Michael Mumma, Takayuki Muto, Tohru Nagao, Joan R. Najita, Julio Navarro, Michael Pierce, Jason X. Prochaska, Masamune Oguri, Devendra K. Ojha, Yoshiko K. Okamoto, Glenn Orton, Angel Otarola, Masami Ouchi, Chris Packham, Deborah L. Padgett, Shashi Bhushan Pandey, Catherine Pilachowsky, Klaus M. Pontoppidan, Joel Primack, Shalima Puthiyaveettil, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, Naveen Reddy, Michael Rich, Matthew J. Richter, James Schombert, Anjan Ananda Sen, Jianrong Shi, Kartik Sheth, R. Srianand, Jonathan C. Tan, Masayuki Tanaka, Angelle Tanner, Nozomu Tominaga, David Tytler, Vivian U, Lingzhi Wang, Xiaofeng Wang, Yiping Wang, Gillian Wilson, Shelley Wright, Chao Wu, Xufeng Wu, Renxin Xu, Toru Yamada, Bin Yang, Gongbo Zhao, Hongsheng Zhao
    The TMT Detailed Science Case describes the transformational science that the Thirty Meter Telescope will enable. Planned to begin science operations in 2024, TMT will open up opportunities for revolutionary discoveries in essentially every field of astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, seeing much fainter objects much more clearly than existing telescopes. Per this capability, TMT's science agenda fills all of space and time, from nearby comets and asteroids, to exoplanets, to the most distant galaxies, and all the way back to the very first sources of light in the Universe. More than 150 astronomers from within the TMT partnership and beyond offered input in compiling the new 2015 Detailed Science Case. The contributing astronomers represent the entire TMT partnership, including the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA), the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the University of California, the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA) and US associate partner, the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).
  • We present broadband (3 -- 78 keV) NuSTAR X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the Crab nebula and pulsar. We show that while the phase-averaged and spatially integrated nebula + pulsar spectrum is a power-law in this energy band, spatially resolved spectroscopy of the nebula finds a break at $\sim$9 keV in the spectral photon index of the torus structure with a steepening characterized by $\Delta\Gamma\sim0.25$. We also confirm a previously reported steepening in the pulsed spectrum, and quantify it with a broken power-law with break energy at $\sim$12 keV and $\Delta\Gamma\sim0.27$. We present spectral maps of the inner 100\as\ of the remnant and measure the size of the nebula as a function of energy in seven bands. These results find that the rate of shrinkage with energy of the torus size can be fitted by a power-law with an index of $\gamma = 0.094\pm 0.018$, consistent with the predictions of Kennel and Coroniti (1984). The change in size is more rapid in the NW direction, coinciding with the counter-jet where we find the index to be a factor of two larger. NuSTAR observed the Crab during the latter part of a $\gamma$-ray flare, but found no increase in flux in the 3 - 78 keV energy band.
  • As of 2014 August, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) had observed ~30 X-ray binaries either as part of the planned program, as targets of opportunity, or for instrument calibration. The main science goals for the observations include probing the inner part of the accretion disk and constraining black hole spins via reflection components, providing the first observations of hard X-ray emission from quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs), measuring cyclotron lines from accreting pulsars, and studying type I X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Here, we describe the science objectives in more depth and give an overview of the NuSTAR observations that have been carried out to achieve the objectives. These include observation of four "IGR" High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) discovered by INTEGRAL. We also summarize the results that have been obtained and their implications. Among the IGR HMXBs, we focus on the discovery of a cyclotron line in the spectrum of IGR J17544-2619.
  • Prior to the launch of NuSTAR, it was not feasible to spatially resolve the hard (E > 10 keV) emission from galaxies beyond the Local Group. The combined NuSTAR dataset, comprised of three ~165 ks observations, allows spatial characterization of the hard X-ray emission in the galaxy NGC 253 for the first time. As a follow up to our initial study of its nuclear region, we present the first results concerning the full galaxy from simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra, and VLBA monitoring of the local starburst galaxy NGC 253. Above ~10 keV, nearly all the emission is concentrated within 100" of the galactic center, produced almost exclusively by three nuclear sources, an off-nuclear ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), and a pulsar candidate that we identify for the first time in these observations. We detect 21 distinct sources in energy bands up to 25 keV, mostly consisting of intermediate state black hole X-ray binaries. The global X-ray emission of the galaxy - dominated by the off-nuclear ULX and nuclear sources, which are also likely ULXs - falls steeply (photon index >~ 3) above 10 keV, consistent with other NuSTAR-observed ULXs, and no significant excess above the background is detected at E > 40 keV. We report upper limits on diffuse inverse Compton emission for a range of spatial models. For the most extended morphologies considered, these hard X-ray constraints disfavor a dominant inverse Compton component to explain the {\gamma}-ray emission detected with Fermi and H.E.S.S. If NGC 253 is typical of starburst galaxies at higher redshift, their contribution to the E > 10 keV cosmic X-ray background is < 1%.
  • We present optical spectroscopic measurements of the eclipsing High Mass X-ray Binary XMMU J013236.7+303228 in M33. Based on spectra taken at multiple epochs of the 1.73d binary orbital period we determine physical as well as orbital parameters for the donor star. We find the donor to be a B1.5IV sub-giant with effective temperature T=22,000-23,000 K. From the luminosity, temperature and known distance to M33 we derive a radius of R = 8.9 \pm 0.5 R_sun. From the radial--velocity measurements, we determine a velocity semi-amplitude of K_opt = 63 \pm 12 km/sec. Using the physical properties of the B-star determined from the optical spectrum, we estimate the star's mass to be M_opt = 11 \pm 1 M_sun. Based on the X-ray spectrum, the compact companion is likely a neutron star, although no pulsations have yet been detected. Using the spectroscopically derived B-star mass we find the neutron star companion mass to be M_X = 2.0 \pm 0.4 M_sun, consistent with the neutron star mass in the HMXB Vela X-1, but heavier than the canonical value of 1.4 M_sun found for many millisecond pulsars. We attempt to use as an additional constraint that the B star radius inferred from temperature, flux, and distance, should equate the Roche radius, since the system accretes by Roche lobe overflow. This leads to substantially larger masses, but from trying to apply the technique to known systems, we find that the masses are consistently overestimated. Attempting to account for that in our uncertainties, we derive M_X = 2.2^{+0.8}_{-0.6} M_sun and M_opt =13 \pm 4 M_sun. We conclude that precise constraints require detailed modeling of the shape of the Roche surface.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is an extremely capable and efficient black hole finder. We present a simple mid-infrared color criterion, W1-W2 \geq 0.8 (i.e., [3.4]-[4.6] \geq 0.8, Vega), which identifies 61.9 \pm 5.4 AGN candidates per deg2 to a depth of W2 = 15.0. This implies a much larger census of luminous AGN than found by typical wide-area surveys, attributable to the fact that mid-infrared selection identifies both unobscured (type 1) and obscured (type 2) AGN. Optical and soft X-ray surveys alone are highly biased towards only unobscured AGN, while this simple WISE selection likely identifies even heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN. Using deep, public data in the COSMOS field, we explore the properties of WISE-selected AGN candidates. At the mid-infrared depth considered, 160 uJy at 4.6 microns, this simple criterion identifies 78% of Spitzer mid-infrared AGN candidates according to the criteria of Stern et al. (2005) and the reliability is 95%. We explore the demographics, multiwavelength properties and redshift distribution of WISE-selected AGN candidates in the COSMOS field.
  • The X-ray source CXOXBJ142607.6+353351 (CXOJ1426+35), which was identified in a 172 ks Chandra image in the Bootes field, shows double-peaked rest-frame optical/UV emission lines, separated by 0.69" (5.5 kpc) in the spatial dimension and by 690 km s^-1 in the velocity dimension. The high excitation lines and emission line ratios indicate both systems are ionized by an AGN continuum, and the double-peaked profile resembles that of candidate dual AGN. At a redshift of z=1.175, this source is the highest redshift candidate dual AGN yet identified. However, many sources have similar emission line profiles for which other interpretations are favored. We have analyzed the substantial archival data available in this field, as well as acquired near-infrared (NIR) adaptive optics (AO) imaging and NIR slit spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum is hard, implying a column density of several 10^23 cm^-2. Though heavily obscured, the source is also one of the brightest in the field, with an absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosity of ~10^45 erg s^-1. Outflows driven by an accretion disk may produce the double-peaked lines if the central engine accretes near the Eddington limit. However, we may be seeing the narrow line regions of two AGN following a galactic merger. While the AO image reveals only a single source, a second AGN would easily be obscured by the significant extinction inferred from the X-ray data. Understanding the physical processes producing the complex emission line profiles seen in CXOJ1426+35 and related sources is important for interpreting the growing population of dual AGN candidates.
  • We report two new low metallicity blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), WISEP J080103.93+264053.9 (hereafter W0801+26) and WISEP J170233.53+180306.4 (hereafter W1702+18), discovered using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We identified these two BCDs from their extremely red colors at mid-infrared wavelengths, and obtained follow-up optical spectroscopy using the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer on Keck I. The mid-infrared properties of these two sources are similar to the well studied, extremely low metallicity galaxy SBS 0335-052E. We determine metallicities of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.75 and 7.63 for W0801+26 and W1702+18, respectively, placing them amongst a very small group of very metal deficient galaxies (Z < 1/10 Zsun). Their > 300 Angstrom Hbeta equivalent widths, similar to SBS 0335-052E, imply the existence of young (< 5 Myr) star forming regions. We measure star formation rates of 2.6 and 10.9 Msun/yr for W0801+26 and W1702+18, respectively. These BCDs, showing recent star formation activity in extremely low metallicity environments, provide new laboratories for studying star formation in extreme conditions and are low-redshift analogs of the first generation of galaxies to form in the universe. Using the all-sky WISE survey, we discuss a new method to identify similar star forming, low metallicity BCDs.
  • We report the discovery of radio afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst GRB 090423, which exploded at a redshift of 8.3, making it the object with the highest known redshift in the Universe. By combining our radio measurements with existing X-ray and infrared observations, we estimate the kinetic energy of the afterglow, the geometry of the outflow and the density of the circumburst medium. Our best fit model is a quasi-spherical, high-energy explosion in a low, constant-density medium. \event had a similar energy release to the other well-studied high redshift GRB 050904 ($z=6.26$), but their circumburst densities differ by two orders of magnitude. We compare the properties of \event with a sample of GRBs at moderate redshifts. We find that the high energy and afterglow properties of \event are not sufficiently different from other GRBs to suggest a different kind of progenitor, such as a Population III star. However, we argue that it is not clear that the afterglow properties alone can provide convincing identification of Population III progenitors. We suggest that the millimeter and centimeter radio detections of \event at early times contained emission from a reverse shock component. This has important implications for the detection of high redshift GRBs by the next generation of radio facilities.
  • We present the results of Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of two highly-obscured massive X-ray binaries: IGR J16318-4848 and GX301-2. Our observations reveal for the first time the extremely rich mid-infrared environments of this type of source, including multiple continuum emission components (a hot component with T > 700 K and a warm component with T ~ 180 K) with apparent silicate absorption features, numerous HI recombination lines, many forbidden ionic lines of low ionization potentials, and pure rotational H2 lines. This indicates that both sources have hot and warm circumstellar dust, ionized stellar winds, extended low-density ionized regions, and photo-dissociated regions. It appears difficult to attribute the total optical extinction of both sources to the hot and warm dust components, which suggests that there could be an otherwise observable colder dust component responsible for the most of the optical extinction and silicate absorption features. The observed mid-infrared spectra are similar to those from Luminous Blue Variables, indicating that the highly-obscured massive X-ray binaries may represent a previously unknown evolutionary phase of X-ray binaries with early-type optical companions. Our results highlight the importance and utility of mid-infrared spectroscopy to investigate highly-obscured X-ray binaries.
  • We present a long-term multi-wavelength light curve of Galactic black hole candidate GRS 1758-258 by combining previously published and archival data from GRANAT, ROSAT, CGRO, RXTE, SAX, ASCA, EXOSAT, and the VLA. In addition we include first spectral results from the balloon-borne Gamma-ray Arcminute Telescope Imaging System (GRATIS). In light of divergent analyses of the 1991-1993 ROSAT observations, we have re-analyzed these data; we find the soft X-rays track the hard X-rays, and that the fits require no black-body component-- indicating that GRS 1758-258 did not go to the high state in 1993. We offer an interpretation based on the ADAF model for a system with mdot \ltsim mdot_crit. We find the 1990-1993 coeval hard and soft X-ray observations support the ADAF predictions. We discuss a new way to constrain black-hole mass with spectral data and the ADAF theory, and apply this technique to GRS 1758-258 to find M_1 \gtsim 8--9 M_sol at an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc. Further investigations of the ADAF model allow us to evaluate the model critically against the data and flux-flux diagram of Barret, McClintock & Grindlay (1996) and to understand the limits of the latter's ``X-ray burster box.''