• Euclid is a Europe-led cosmology space mission dedicated to a visible and near infrared survey of the entire extra-galactic sky. Its purpose is to deepen our knowledge of the dark content of our Universe. After an overview of the Euclid mission and science, this contribution describes how the community is getting organized to face the data analysis challenges, both in software development and in operational data processing matters. It ends with a more specific account of some of the main contributions of the Swiss Science Data Center (SDC-CH).
  • We extend our earlier model of the small scale structure of cosmic string networks through an improved treatment of the separation of long and short scales. We find that the production of small loops (at the gravitational radiation scale) is a robust feature of string networks, in addition to a population of loops near the horizon scale. We obtain quantitative agreement with the scaling of loop production functions as found in simulations by two groups.
  • We use current theoretical estimates for the density of long cosmic strings to predict the number of strong gravitational lensing events in astronomical imaging surveys as a function of angular resolution and survey area. We show that angular resolution is the most important factor, and that interesting limits on the dimensionless string tension Gmu/c^2 can be obtained by existing and planned surveys. At the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (0.14"), it is sufficient to survey of order a few square degrees -- well within reach of the current HST archive -- to probe the regime Gmu/c^2 ~ 10^{-7}. If lensing by cosmic strings is not detected, such a survey would improve the limit on the string tension by a factor of two over that available from the cosmic microwave background. Future high resolution imaging surveys, covering a few hundred square degrees or more, either from space in the optical or from large-format radio telescopes on the ground, would be able to further lower this limit to Gmu/c^2 < 10^{-8}.
  • We present a numerical analysis to simulate the response of a spherical resonant gravitational wave detector and to compute its sensitivity. Under the assump- tion of optimal filtering, we work out the sensitivity curve for a sphere first taking into account only a single transducer, and then using a coherent analysis of the whole set of transducers.
  • We consider a population of small, high-velocity cosmic string loops. We assume the typical length of these loops is determined by the gravitational radiation scale and use the results of \cite{Polchinski:2007rg} which pointed out their highly relativistic nature. A study of the gravitational wave emission from such a population is carried out. The large Lorentz boost involved causes the lowest harmonics of the loops to fall within the frequency band of the LIGO detector. Due to this feature the gravitational waves emitted by such loops can be detected in a periodic search rather than in burst or stochastic analysis. It is shown that, for interesting values of the string tension ($10^{-10}\lsim G\mu\lsim 10^{-8}$) the detector can observe loops at reasonably high redshifts and that detection is, in principle, possible. We compute the number of expected observations produced by such a process. For a 10 hour search we find that this number is of order $O(10^{-4})$. This is a consequence of the low effective number density of the loops traveling along the line of sight. However, small probabilities of reconnection and longer observation times can improve the result.
  • We investigate microlensing in the case where the lens is considered as an extended object. We use a multipolar expansion of the lens potential and show that the time-varying nature of the quadrupole contribution allows to separate it from the mass and spin contributions and leads to specific modulations of the amplification signal. As example we study the case of binary system lenses in our galaxy. The modulation is observable if the rotation period of the system is smaller than the time over which the amplification is significant and if the impact parameter of the passing light ray is sufficiently close to the Einstein radius so that the amplification is large. Observations of this modulation can reveal important information on the quadrupole and thus on the gravitational radiation emitted by the binary lens. Even if not observed directly, because of their importance the quadrupole modulation has to be included in the error budget for high magnification ($\mu\leq7$) microlensing events.
  • We analyze two kinds of matched filters for data output of a spherical resonant GW detector. In order to filter the data of a real sphere, a strategy is proposed, firstly using an omnidirectional in-line filter, which is supposed to select periodograms with excitations, secondly by performing a directional filter on such selected periodograms, finding the wave arrival time, direction and polarization. We point out that, as the analytical simplifications occurring in the ideal 6 transducers TIGA sphere do not hold for a real sphere, using a 5 transducers configuration could be a more convenient choice.
  • We study the deformation of a long cosmic string by a nearby rotating black hole. We examine whether the deformation of a cosmic string, induced by the gravitational field of a Kerr black hole, may lead to the formation of a loop of cosmic string. The segment of the string which enters the ergosphere of a rotating black hole gets deformed and, if it is sufficiently twisted, it can self-intersect chopping off a loop of cosmic string. We find that the formation of a loop, via this mechanism, is a rare event. It will only arise in a small region of the collision phase space, which depends on the string velocity, the impact parameter and the black hole angular momentum. We conclude that generically, the cosmic string is simply scattered or captured by the rotating black hole.
  • We discuss the relevance, for the search of gravitational-wave bursts, of upper limits on the total mass loss of the Galaxy which come from various astronomical observations. For sub-millisecond bursts we obtain limits on the event rate, as a function of the GW amplitude, which are stronger than the corresponding upper limits set by LIGO in the S2 run. A detection of a burst rate saturating these limits, with the sensitivities of present and near-future runs, would imply that, with some improvement on the accuracy of astronomical observations of the Galaxy, as foreseen with the GAIA mission, it might be possible to detect gravitational waves indirectly from their effect on galactic dynamics.
  • We describe the entire phase structure of a large number of colour generalized Yang-Mills theories in 1+1 dimensions. This is illustrated by the explicit computation for a quartic plus quadratic model. We show that the Douglas-Kazakov and cut-off transitions are naturally present for generalized Yang-Mills theories separating the phase space into three regions: a dilute one a strongly interacting one and a degenerate one. Each region is separated into sub-phases. For the first two regions the transitions between sub-phases are described by the Jurekiewicz-Zalewski analysis. The cut-off transition and degenerated phase arise only for a finite number of colours. We present second-order phase transitions between sub-phases of the degenerate phase.
  • Gravitational wave bursters are sources which emit repeatedly bursts of gravitational waves, and have been recently suggested as potentially interesting candidates for gravitational wave (GW) detectors. Mechanisms that could give rise to a GW burster can be found for instance in highly magnetized neutron stars (the magnetars which explain the phenomenon of soft gamma repeaters), in accreting neutron stars and in hybrid stars with a quark core. We point out that these sources have very distinctive experimental signatures. In particular, as already observed in the gamma-ray bursts from soft gamma repeaters, the energy spectrum of the events is a power-law, dN\sim E^{-\gamma}dE with \gamma\simeq 1.6, and they have a distribution of waiting times (the times between one outburst and the next) significantly different from the distribution of uncorrelated events. We discuss possible detection strategies that could be used to search for these events in existing gravitational wave detectors.
  • Using tidal disruption of globular clusters by the galactic center, we put limits on the total mass ever enclosed into orbits of observed globular clusters. Under the assumption that the rate of mass loss from the Galaxy is steady, we then deduce a bound on this rate. In particular this bound can be used to constrain the galactic gravitational wave luminosity.
  • We discuss the possibility that galactic gravitational wave sources might give burst signals at a rate of several events per year, detectable by state-of-the-art detectors. We are stimulated by the results of the data collected by the EXPLORER and NAUTILUS bar detectors in the 2001 run, which suggest an excess of coincidences between the two detectors, when the resonant bars are orthogonal to the galactic plane. Signals due to the coalescence of galactic compact binaries fulfill the energy requirements but are problematic for lack of known candidates with the necessary merging rate. We examine the limits imposed by galactic dynamics on the mass loss of the Galaxy due to GW emission, and we use them to put constraints also on the GW radiation from exotic objects, like binaries made of primordial black holes. We discuss the possibility that the events are due to GW bursts coming repeatedly from a single or a few compact sources. We examine different possible realizations of this idea, such as accreting neutron stars, strange quark stars, and the highly magnetized neutron stars (``magnetars'') introduced to explain Soft Gamma Repeaters. Various possibilities are excluded or appear very unlikely, while others at present cannot be excluded.
  • Two dimensional SU(N) Yang-Mills theory is known to be equivalent to a string theory, as found by Gross in the large N limit, using the 1/N expansion. Later it was found that even a generalized YM theory leads to a string theory of the Gross type. In the standard YM theory case, Douglas and others found the string hamiltonian describing the propagation and the interactions of states made of strings winding on a cylindrical space-time. We address the problem of finding a similar hamiltonian for the generalized YM theory. As in the standard case we start by writing the theory as a theory of free fermions. Performing a bosonization, we express the hamiltonian in terms of the modes of a bosonic field, that are interpreted as in the standard case as creation and destruction operators for states of strings winding around the cylindrical space-time. The result is similar to the standard hamiltonian, but with new kinds of interaction vertices.