• (Abridged) We present Herschel/HIFI spectra of the H2O 1113 GHz and H2O+ 1115 GHz lines toward five nearby prototypical starburst/AGN systems, and OH+ 971 GHz spectra toward three of these. The beam size of 20" corresponds to resolutions between 0.35 and 7 kpc. The observed line profiles range from pure absorption (NGC 4945, M82) to P-Cygni indicating outflow (NGC 253, Arp 220) and inverse P-Cygni indicating infall (Cen A). The similarity of the H2O, OH+, and H2O+ profiles to each other and to HI indicates that diffuse and dense gas phases are well mixed. We estimate column densities assuming negligible excitation (for absorption features) and using a non-LTE model (for emission features), adopting calculated collision data for H2O and OH+, and rough estimates for H2O+. Column densities range from ~10^13 to ~10^15 cm^-2 for each species, and are similar between absorption and emission components, indicating that the nuclear region does not contribute much to the emission in these ground-state lines. The N(H2O)/N(H2O+) ratios of 1.4-5.6 indicate an origin of the lines in diffuse gas, and the N(OH+)/N(H2O+) ratios of 1.6-3.1 indicate a low H2 fraction (~11%) in the gas. Adopting recent Galactic values for the average gas density and the ionization efficiency, we find ionization rates for our sample galaxies of ~3x10^-16 s^-1 which are similar to the value for the Galactic disk, but ~10x below that of the Galactic Center and ~100x below estimates for AGN from excited-state H3O+ lines. We conclude that the ground-state lines of water and its associated ions probe primarily non-nuclear gas in the disks of these centrally active galaxies. Our data thus provide evidence for a decrease in ionization rate by a factor of ~10 from the nuclei to the disks of galaxies, as found before for the Milky Way.
  • This paper reviews recent observations of water in Galactic interstellar clouds and nearby galactic nuclei. Two results are highlighted: (1) Multi-line H$_2$O mapping of the Orion Bar shows that the water chemistry in PDRs is driven by photodissociation and -desorption, unlike in star-forming regions. (2) High-resolution spectra of H$_2$O and its ions toward 5 starburst / AGN systems reveal low ionization rates, unlike as found from higher-excitation lines. We conclude that the chemistry of water strongly depends on radiation environment, and that the ionization rates of interstellar clouds decrease by at least 10 between galactic nuclei and disks.
  • We aim to understand the rich chemical composition of AFGL 2591, a prototypical isolated high-mass star-forming region. Based on HIFI and JCMT data, the molecular abundances of species found in the protostellar envelope of AFGL 2591 were derived with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RATRAN, assuming either constant values or 1D stepwise radial profiles as abundance distributions. The reconstructed 1D abundances were compared with the results of time-dependent gas-grain chemical modeling, considering ages of 10,000 to 50,000 years, cosmic-ray ionization rates of 0.5 to 50 times 10^-16 s^-1, uniformly-sized 0.1-1 micron dust grains, a dust/gas ratio of 1%, and several sets of initial molecular abundances with C/O <1 and >1. Constant abundance models give good fits to the data for CO, CN, CS, HCO+, H2CO, N2H+, C2H, NO, OCS, OH, H2CS, O, C, C+, and CH. Models with an abundance jump at 100 K give good fits to the data for NH3, SO, SO2, H2S, H2O, HCl, and CH3OH. For HCN and HNC, the best models have an abundance jump at 230 K. The time-dependent chemical model can accurately explain abundance profiles of 15 out of these 24 species. The jump-like radial profiles for key species like HCO+, NH3, and H2O are consistent with the outcome of the time-dependent chemical modeling. The best-fit model has a chemical age of 10-50 kyr, a solar C/O ratio of 0.44, and a cosmic-ray ionization rate of 5 x 10^-17 s^-1; grain properties and external UV intensity do not affect the calculated chemical structure much. We thus demonstrate that simple constant or jump-like abundance profiles agree with time-dependent chemical modeling for most key C-, O-, N-, and S-bearing molecules. The main exceptions are species with very few observed transitions (C, O, C+, and CH), with a poorly established chemical network (HCl, H2S) or whose chemistry is strongly affected by surface processes (CH3OH).
  • We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C-shock through a clump with preshock density 2e4/cm3, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O$_2$ can explain the emission from the source if its line of sight dimension is ~10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O$_2$ emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of a broad band spectral line survey of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL), one of the most chemically rich regions in the Galaxy, using the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. This survey spans a frequency range from 480 to 1907 GHz at a resolution of 1.1 MHz. These observations thus encompass the largest spectral coverage ever obtained toward this high-mass star-forming region in the sub-mm with high spectral resolution, and include frequencies $>$ 1 THz where the Earth's atmosphere prevents observations from the ground. In all, we detect emission from 39 molecules (79 isotopologues). Combining this dataset with ground based mm spectroscopy obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, we model the molecular emission from the mm to the far-IR using the XCLASS program which assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Several molecules are also modeled with the MADEX non-LTE code. Because of the wide frequency coverage, our models are constrained by transitions over an unprecedented range in excitation energy. A reduced $\chi^{2}$ analysis indicates that models for most species reproduce the observed emission well. In particular, most complex organics are well fit by LTE implying gas densities are high ($>$10$^6$ cm$^{-3}$) and excitation temperatures and column densities are well constrained. Molecular abundances are computed using H$_{2}$ column densities also derived from the HIFI survey. The distribution of rotation temperatures, $T_{\rm rot}$, for molecules detected toward the hot core is significantly wider than the compact ridge, plateau, and extended ridge $T_{\rm rot}$ distributions, indicating the hot core has the most complex thermal structure.
  • We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) $\lambda =$ 0.88 and 1.3 mm broad band observations, and the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations in $\rm{NH_3}$ $(J,K) = (1,1)$ up to $(5,5)$, $\rm{H_2O}$ and $\rm{CH_3OH}$ maser lines toward the two most massive molecular clumps in infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G11.11-0.12. Sensitive high-resolution images reveal hierarchical fragmentation in dense molecular gas from the $\sim 1$ pc clump scale down to $\sim 0.01$ pc condensation scale. At each scale, the mass of the fragments is orders of magnitude larger than the Jeans mass. This is common to all four IRDC clumps we studied, suggesting that turbulence plays an important role in the early stages of clustered star formation. Masers, shock heated $\rm{NH_3}$ gas, and outflows indicate intense ongoing star formation in some cores while no such signatures are found in others. Furthermore, chemical differentiation may reflect the difference in evolutionary stages among these star formation seeds. We find $\rm{NH_3}$ ortho/para ratios of $1.1\pm0.4$, $2.0\pm0.4$, and $3.0\pm0.7$ associated with three outflows, and the ratio tends to increase along the outflows downstream. Our combined SMA and VLA observations of several IRDC clumps present the most in depth view so far of the early stages prior to the hot core phase, revealing snapshots of physical and chemical properties at various stages along an apparent evolutionary sequence.
  • We report the first detection of a Galactic source of OH+ line emission: the Orion Bar, a bright nearby photon-dominated region. Line emission is detected over ~1' (0.12 pc), tracing the Bar itself as well as the Southern tip of the Orion Ridge. The line width of ~4 km/s suggests an origin of the OH+ emission close to the PDR surface, at a depth of A_V ~0.3-0.5 into the cloud where most hydrogen is in atomic form. Steady-state collisional and radiative excitation models require unrealistically high OH+ column densities to match the observed line intensity, indicating that the formation of OH+ in the Bar is rapid enough to influence its excitation. Our best-fit OH+ column density of ~1x10^14 cm^-2 is similar to that in previous absorption line studies, while our limits on the ratios of OH+/H2O+ (>~40) and OH+/H3O+ (>~15) are higher than seen before. The column density of OH+ is consistent with estimates from a thermo-chemical model for parameters applicable to the Orion Bar, given the current uncertainties in the local gas pressure and the spectral shape of the ionizing radiation field. The unusually high OH+/H2O+ and OH+/H3O+ ratios are probably due to the high UV radiation field and electron density in this object. In the Bar, photodissociation and electron recombination are more effective destroyers of OH+ than the reaction with H2, which limits the production of H2O+. The appearance of the OH+ lines in emission is the result of the high density of electrons and H atoms in the Orion Bar, since for these species, inelastic collisions with OH+ are faster than reactive ones. In addition, chemical pumping, far-infrared pumping by local dust, and near-UV pumping by Trapezium starlight contribute to the OH+ excitation. Similar conditions may apply to extragalactic nuclei where OH+ lines are seen in emission.
  • Based on astrochemical theory, the complex molecular composition around high-mass YSOs should evolve from the outer envelope in toward the central hot region as a sequence of temperature dependent chemical pathways are activated in ices and in the gas-phase. The resulting complex molecules have been broadly classified into three generations dependent on the temperature (<25, >25, and >100 K) required for formation. We combine IRAM 30m and Submillimeter Array observations to explore the spatial distribution of organic molecules around the high-mass young stellar object NGC 7538 IRS9, whose weak complex molecule emission previously escaped detection, quantifying the emission and abundance profiles of key organic molecules as a function of distance from the central protostar. We find that emission from N-bearing organics and saturated O-bearing organics present large increases in emission around 8000 AU and R<3000 AU, while O-bearing molecules and hydrocarbons do not. The increase in flux from some complex molecules in the envelope, around 8000 AU or 25 K, is consistent with recent model predictions of an onset of complex ice chemistry at 20-30 K. The emission increase for some molecules at R<3000 AU suggests the presence of a weak hot core, where thermal ice evaporation and hot gas-phase chemistry drives the chemistry. Complex organics thus form at all radii and temperatures around this protostar, but the composition changes dramatically as the temperature increases, which is used to constrain the chemical generation(s) to which different classes of molecule belong.
  • To understand the origin of water line emission and absorption during high-mass star formation, we decompose high-resolution Herschel-HIFI line spectra toward 19 high-mass star-forming regions into three distinct physical components. Protostellar envelopes are usually seen as narrow absorptions or emissions in the H2O 1113 and 1669 GHz ground-state lines, the H2O 987 GHz excited-state line, and the H2O-18 1102 GHz ground-state line. Broader features due to outflows are usually seen in absorption in the H2O 1113 and 1669 GHz lines, in 987 GHz emission, and not seen in H2O-18, indicating a low column density and a high excitation temperature. The H2O 1113 and 1669 GHz spectra show narrow absorptions by foreground clouds along the line of sight, which have a low column density and a low excitation temperature, although their H2O ortho/para ratios are close to 3. The intensities of the H2O 1113 and 1669 GHz lines do not show significant trends with luminosity, mass, or age. In contrast, the 987 GHz line flux increases with luminosity and the H2O-18 line flux decreases with mass. Furthermore, appearance of the envelope in absorption in the 987 GHz and H2O-18 lines seems to be a sign of an early evolutionary stage. We conclude that the ground state transitions of H2O trace the outer parts of the envelopes, so that the effects of star formation are mostly noticeable in the outflow wings. These lines are heavily affected by absorption, so that line ratios of H2O involving the ground states must be treated with caution. The average H2O abundance in high-mass protostellar envelopes does not change much with time. The 987 GHz line appears to be a good tracer of the mean weighted dust temperature of the source, which may explain why it is readily seen in distant galaxies.
  • We report the results of a search for molecular oxygen (O2) toward the Orion Bar, a prominent photodissociation region at the southern edge of the HII region created by the luminous Trapezium stars. We observed the spectral region around the frequency of the O2 N_J = 3_3 - 1_2 transition at 487 GHz and the 5_4 - 3_4 transition at 774 GHz using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory. Neither line was detected, but the 3sigma upper limits established here translate to a total line-of-sight O2 column density < 1.5 10^16 cm^-2 for an emitting region whose temperature is between 30K and 250 K, or < 1 10^16 cm^-2 if the O2 emitting region is primarily at a temperature of ~< 100 K. Because the Orion Bar is oriented nearly edge-on relative to our line of sight, the observed column density is enhanced by a factor estimated to be between 4 and 20 relative to the face-on value. Our upper limits imply that the face-on O2 column density is less than 4 10^15 cm^-2, a value that is below, and possibly well below, model predictions for gas with a density of 10^4 - 10^5 cm^-3 exposed to a far ultraviolet flux 10^4 times the local value, conditions inferred from previous observations of the Orion Bar. The discrepancy might be resolved if: (1) the adsorption energy of O atoms to ice is greater than 800 K; (2) the total face-on Av of the Bar is less than required for O2 to reach peak abundance; (3) the O2 emission arises within dense clumps with a small beam filling factor; or, (4) the face-on depth into the Bar where O2 reaches its peak abundance, which is density dependent, corresponds to a sky position different from that sampled by our Herschel beams.
  • This paper contains a summary of the results from the first years of observations with the HIFI instrument onboard ESA's Herschel space observatory. The paper starts by outlining the goals and possibilities of far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy, the limitations of the Earth's atmosphere, and the scientific scope of the Herschel-HIFI mission. The presentation of science results from the mission follows the life cycle of gas in galaxies as grouped into five themes: Structure of the interstellar medium, First steps in interstellar chemistry, Formation of stars and planets, Solar system results and Evolved stellar envelopes. The HIFI observations paint a picture where the interstellar medium in galaxies has a mixed, rather than a layered structure; the same conclusion may hold for protoplanetary disks. In addition, the HIFI data show that exchange of matter between comets and asteroids with planets and moons plays a large role. The paper concludes with an outlook to future instrumentation in the far-infrared and submillimeter wavelength ranges.
  • The H3+ ion plays a key role in the chemistry of dense interstellar gas clouds where stars and planets are forming. The low temperatures and high extinctions of such clouds make direct observations of H3+ impossible, but lead to large abundances of H2D+ and D2H+ which are very useful probes of the early stages of star and planet formation. Maps of H2D+ and D2H+ pure rotational line emission toward star-forming regions show that the strong deuteration of H3+ is the result of near-complete molecular depletion of CNO-bearing molecules onto grain surfaces, which quickly disappears as cores warm up after stars have formed. In the warmer parts of interstellar gas clouds, H3+ transfers its proton to other neutrals such as CO and N2, leading to a rich ionic chemistry. The abundances of such species are useful tracers of physical conditions such as the radiation field and the electron fraction. Recent observations of HF line emission toward the Orion Bar imply a high electron fraction, and we suggest that observations of OH+ and H2O+ emission may be used to probe the electron density in the nuclei of external galaxies.
  • Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI), we have observed para-chloronium (H2Cl+) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight-lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km/s cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H2-35Cl+ and para-H2-37Cl+ isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 1(11)-0(00) transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for ~ 4 - 12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of ~ 2.0E+13 cm-2 and ~ 1.2E+13 cm-2, respectively, for chloronium in these two sources. We obtained upper limits on the para-H2-35Cl+ line strengths toward H2 Peak 1 in the Orion Molecular cloud and toward the massive young star AFGL 2591. The chloronium abundances inferred in this study are typically at least a factor ~10 larger than the predictions of steady-state theoretical models for the chemistry of interstellar molecules containing chlorine. Several explanations for this discrepancy were investigated, but none has proven satisfactory, and thus the large observed abundances of chloronium remain puzzling.
  • We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5\times1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19"), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is 0.3 - 7.3\times10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~ 5" diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~ 10 M\odot and the dust temperature is \geq 150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T \geq 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature \geq 180 K. The inferred O2 column density \simeq 5\times1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) \simeq 4\times1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10 to 15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2.
  • The estimation of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds from spectroscopic observations requires radiative transfer calculations, which depend on basic molecular input data. This paper reviews recent developments in the fields of molecular data and radiative transfer. The first part is an overview of radiative transfer techniques, along with a "road map" showing which technique should be used in which situation. The second part is a review of measurements and calculations of molecular spectroscopic and collisional data, with a summary of recent collisional calculations and suggested modeling strategies if collision data are unavailable. The paper concludes with an overview of future developments and needs in the areas of radiative transfer and molecular data.
  • This paper reviews the first results of observations of H2O line emission with Herschel-HIFI towards high-mass star-forming regions, obtained within the WISH guaranteed time program. The data reveal three kinds of gas-phase H2O: `cloud water' in cold tenuous foreground clouds, `envelope water' in dense protostellar envelopes, and `outflow water' in protostellar outflows. The low H2O abundance (1e-10 -- 1e-9) in foreground clouds and protostellar envelopes is due to rapid photodissociation and freeze-out on dust grains, respectively. The outflows show higher H2O abundances (1e-7 -- 1e-6) due to grain mantle evaporation and (probably) neutral-neutral reactions.
  • The astrochemistry of the HnO+ (n=1..3) ions is important as the main gas-phase formation route for water, and as tracer of the interstellar ionization rate by cosmic rays and other processes. While interstellar H3O+ has been known since the early 1990's, interstellar OH+ and H2O+ have only recently been detected using the Herschel space observatory and also from the ground. This paper reviews detections of HnO+ toward external galaxies and compares with ground-based work. The similarities and differences of the HnO+ chemistry within the Galaxy and beyond are discussed. Special attention is given to the low H2O/H3O+ ratio in M82 of only 3.3, suggesting rapid H2O photodissociation, and the high apparent OH+ and H2O+ abundances in Mrk 231, suggesting radiative excitation and/or formation pumping. Photodissociation rates for H3O+ and collisional cross-sections for OH+ and H2O+ with H, He and electrons are needed to test these interpretations.
  • We have observed the rotational ground-state (J = 1-0) transitions of DCO+, HN13C and DNC with the IRAM 30m telescope toward the dark cloud LDN 1512 which has exceptionally narrow lines permitting hyperfine splitting to be resolved in part. The measured splittings of 50-300 kHz are used to derive nuclear quadrupole and spin-rotation parameters for these species. The measurements are supplemented by high-level quantum-chemical calculations using coupled-cluster techniques and large atomic-orbital basis sets. We find eQq = +151.12 (400) kHz and C_I = -1.12 (43) kHz for DCO+, eQq = 272.5 (51) kHz for HN13C, and eQq(D) = 265.9 (83) kHz and eQq(N) = 288.2 (71) kHz for DNC. The numbers for DNC are consistent with previous laboratory data, while our constants for DCO+ are somewhat smaller than previous results based on astronomical data. For both DCO+ and DNC, our results are more accurate than previous determinations. Our results are in good agreement with the corresponding best theoretical estimates. We also derive updated rotational constants for HN13C: B = 43545.6000 (47) MHz and D = 93.7 (20) kHz. The hyperfine splittings of the DCO+, DNC and HN13C J = 1-0 lines range over 0.47-1.28 km/s, which is comparable to typical line widths in pre-stellar cores and to systematic gas motions on ~1000 AU scales in protostellar cores. We present tabular information to allow inclusion of the hyperfine splitting in astronomical data interpretation. The large differences in the 14N quadrupole parameters of DNC and HN13C have been traced to differences in the vibrational corrections caused by significant non-rigidity of these molecules, particularly along the bending coordinate.
  • We discuss some implications of our recent detection of extragalactic H3O+: the location of the gas in M82, the origin of energetic radiation in M82, and the possible feedback effects of star formation on the cosmic ray flux in galaxies.
  • This review discusses recent results on the astrochemistry of (mostly high-mass) star-forming regions. After an introduction on the use of chemistry in astrophysics and some basic concepts of astrochemistry, specific results are presented. Highlighted areas are the use of chemistry in the search for massive circumstellar disks, the interaction of molecular clouds with cosmic rays, and the feedback effects of protostellar irradiation on the parent molecular cloud. The review concludes with a discussion of future observational opportunities.
  • The H3O+ molecule probes the oxygen chemistry and the ionization rate of dense circumnuclear gas in galaxies. In particular, recent H3O+ observations show variations in the cosmic-ray ionization rate by factors of $>$10 within our Galaxy. Using the JCMT, we have observed the 364 GHz line of p-H3O+ in the centers of M82 and Arp 220. In Arp 220, the line profile suggests that the emission originates in the Western nucleus. In M82, both the eastern molecular peak and the circumnuclear region contribute to the emission. The derived column densities, abundances, and H3O+ / H2O ratios indicate ionization rates similar to or even exceeding that in the Galactic Center. Model calculations of the chemistry of irradiated molecular gas indicate a likely origin of this high ionization rate in the extended, evolved starburst of M82. In contrast, irradiation by X-rays from the AGN disk is the most likely model for Arp 220.
  • The large quantity and high quality of modern radio and infrared line observations require efficient modeling techniques to infer physical and chemical parameters such as temperature, density, and molecular abundances. We present a computer program to calculate the intensities of atomic and molecular lines produced in a uniform medium, based on statistical equilibrium calculations involving collisional and radiative processes and including radiation from background sources. Optical depth effects are treated with an escape probability method. The program is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.sron.rug.nl/~vdtak/radex/index.shtml . The program makes use of molecular data files maintained in the Leiden Atomic and Molecular Database (LAMDA), which will continue to be improved and expanded. The performance of the program is compared with more approximate and with more sophisticated methods. An Appendix provides diagnostic plots to estimate physical parameters from line intensity ratios of commonly observed molecules. This program should form an important tool in analyzing observations from current and future radio and infrared telescopes.
  • This paper presents an overview of several modeling tools for analyzing molecular line observations at submillimeter wavelengths. These tools are already proving to be very valuable for the interpretation of data from current telescopes, and will be indispensable for data obtained with ALMA. The tools are: (1) the Leiden Atomic and Molecular DAtabase (LAMDA), a collection of spectroscopic data and collisional excitation rates; (2) RADEX, an on-line and off-line program to calculate non-LTE excitation and emission from a homogeneous medium, based on the escape probability approximation; (3) RATRAN, an accelerated Monte Carlo program to solve molecular excitation and radiative transfer in spherical and cylindrical symmetry. The paper presents examples of how to use these tools in conjunction with existing data reduction packages to quantitatively interpret submillimeter single-dish and interferometric observations. The described tools are publically available at http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/~moldata . The paper concludes with a discussion of future needs in the fields of molecular data and radiative transfer.
  • Single-dish spectra and interferometric maps of (sub)mm lines of H2O-18 and HDO are used to study the chemistry of water in eight regions of high-mass star formation. The spectra indicate HDO excitation temperatures of ~110 K and column densities in an 11'' beam of ~2x10^14 cm^-2 for HDO and ~2x10^17 cm^-2 for H2O, with the N(HDO)/N(H2O) ratio increasing with decreasing temperature. Simultaneous observations of CH3OH and SO2 indicate that 20-50% of the single-dish line flux arises in the molecular outflows of these objects. The outflow contribution to the H2O-18 and HDO emission is estimated to be 10-20%. Radiative transfer models indicate that the water abundance is low (~10^-6) outside a critical radius corresponding to a temperature in the protostellar envelope of ~100 K, and `jumps' to H2O/H2 ~ 10^-4 inside this radius. This value corresponds to the observed abundance of solid water and together with the derived HDO/H2O abundance ratios of ~1/1000 suggests that the origin of the observed water is evaporation of grain mantles. This idea is confirmed in the case of AFGL 2591 by interferometer observations of HDO, H2O-18 and SO2 lines, which reveal compact (~800 AU) emission with a systematic velocity gradient. This size is similar to that of the 1.3 mm continuum towards AFGL 2591, from which we estimate a mass of ~0.8 M0, or ~5% of the mass of the central star. We speculate that we may be observing a circumstellar disk in an almost face-on orientation.
  • This paper reports 43 GHz imaging of the high-mass protostars W33A, AFGL 2591 and NGC 7538 IRS9 at 0.04'' and 0.6'' resolution. In each case, weak (~mJy), compact (~100 AU) emission is detected, which has an elongated shape (axis ratio ~3). For AFGL 2591 and NGC 7538 IRS9, the emission is single-peaked, while for the highest luminosity source, W33A, a `mini-cluster' of three sources is detected. The derived sizes, flux densities, and broad-band radio spectra of the sources support recent models where the initial expansion of HII regions around very young O-type stars is prevented by stellar gravity. In these models, accretion flows onto high-mass stars originate in large-scale molecular envelopes and become ionized close to the star. These models reproduce our observations of ionized gas as well as the structure of the molecular envelopes of these sources on 10^3--10^4 AU scales derived previously from single-dish submillimeter continuum and line mapping. For AFGL 2591, the 43 GHz flux density is also consistent with dust emission from a disk seen in near-infrared `speckle' images. However, the alignment of the 43 GHz emission with the large-scale molecular outflow argues against an origin in a disk for AFGL 2591 and NGC 7538 IRS9. In contrast, the outflow from W33A does not appear to be collimated. Together with previously presented case studies of W3 IRS5 and AFGL 2136, our results indicate that the formation of stars and stellar clusters with luminosities up to ~10^5 L0 proceeds through accretion and produces collimated outflows as in the solar-type case, with the `additional feature' that the accretion flow becomes ionized close to the star. Above ~10^5 L0, clusters of HII regions appear, and outflows are no longer collimated, possibly as the result of mergers of protostars or pre-stellar cores.