• The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the the next generation facility of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes; two sites will cover both hemispheres. CTA will reach unprecedented sensitivity, energy and angular resolution in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. Each CTA array will include four Large Size Telescopes (LSTs), designed to cover the low-energy range of the CTA sensitivity ($\sim$20 GeV to 200 GeV). In the baseline LST design, the focal-plane camera will be instrumented with 265 photodetector clusters; each will include seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with an entrance window of 1.5 inches in diameter. The PMT design is based on mature and reliable technology. Recently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are emerging as a competitor. Currently, SiPMs have advantages (e.g. lower operating voltage and tolerance to high illumination levels) and disadvantages (e.g. higher capacitance and cross talk rates), but this technology is still young and rapidly evolving. SiPM technology has a strong potential to become superior to the PMT one in terms of photon detection efficiency and price per square mm of detector area. While the advantage of SiPMs has been proven for high-density, small size cameras, it is yet to be demonstrated for large area cameras such as the one of the LST. We are working to develop a SiPM-based module for the LST camera, in view of a possible camera upgrade. We will describe the solutions we are exploring in order to balance a competitive performance with a minimal impact on the overall LST camera design.
  • In 2007 a prototype of a new analog Sum-Trigger was installed in the MAGIC I telescope, which lowered the trigger threshold from 55 GeV to 25 GeV and led to the detection of pulsed gamma radiation from the Crab pulsar. To eliminate the need for manual tuning and maintenance demanded by that first prototype, a new setup with fully automatic calibration was designed recently. The key element of the new circuit is a novel, continuously variable analog delay line that enables the temporal equalization of the signals from the camera photo sensors, which is crucial for the efficient detection of low-energy showers. A further improvement is the much larger trigger area consisting of a fully revised configuration of overlapping summing patches. The new system will be installed on both telescopes, MAGIC I and II, enabling stereo observation in Sum-Trigger mode. This will significantly improve the sensitivity in the very low energy regime of 20 to 100 GeV, which is essential in particular for detailed pulsar studies, as well as the observation of high-redshift AGNs and distant GRB events. Here we like to present the results of functionality tests of a fully working prototype and the basic design of the final system.