• We study the joint variability of structural information in a hard sphere fluid biased to avoid crystallisation and form fivefold symmetric geometric motifs. We show that the structural covariance matrix approach, originally proposed for on-lattice liquids [Ronceray and Harrowell, JCP 2016], can be meaningfully employed to understand structural relationships between different motifs and can predict, within the linear-response regime, structural changes related to motifs distinct from that used to bias the system.
  • In trajectory space, dynamical heterogeneities in glass-forming liquids correspond to the emergence of a dynamical phase transition between an active phase poor in local structure and an inactive phase which is rich in local structure. We support this scenario with the study of a model additive mixture of Lennard-Jones particles, quantifying how the choice of the relevant structural and dynamical observable affects the transition in trajectory space. We find that the low mobility, structure-rich phase is dominated by icosahedral order. Applying a nonequilibrium rheological protocol, we connect local order to the emergence of mechanical rigidity.
  • A quasi two-dimensional colloidal suspension is studied under the influence of immobilisation (pinning) of a random fraction of its particles. We introduce a novel experimental method to perform random pinning and, with the support of numerical simulation, we find that increasing the pinning concentration smoothly arrests the system, with a cross-over from a regime of high mobility and high entropy to a regime of low mobility and low entropy. At the local level, we study fluctuations in area fraction and concentration of pins and map them to entropic structural signatures and local mobility, obtaining a measure for the local entropic fluctuations of the experimental system.
  • Tackling the low-temperature fate of supercooled liquids is challenging due to the immense timescales involved, which prevent equilibration and lead to the operational glass transition. Relating glassy behaviour to an underlying, thermodynamic phase transition is a long-standing open question in condensed matter physics. Like experiments, computer simulations are limited by the small time window over which a liquid can be equilibrated. Here we address the challenge of low temperature equilibration using trajectory sampling in a system undergoing a nonequilibrium phase transition. This transition occurs in trajectory space between the normal supercooled liquid and a glassy state rich in low-energy geometric motifs. Our results indicate that this transition might become accessible in equilibrium configurational space at a temperature close to the so-called Kauzmann temperature, and provide a possible route to unify dynamical and thermodynamical theories of the glass transition.
  • Among the key insights into the glass transition has been the identification of a non-equilibrium phase transition in trajectory space which reveals phase coexistence between the normal supercooled liquid (active phase) and a glassy state (inactive phase). Here we present evidence that such a transition occurs in experiment. In colloidal hard spheres we find a non-Gaussian distribution of trajectories leaning towards those rich in locally favoured structures (LFS), associated with the emergence of slow dynamics. This we interpret as evidence for an non-equilibrium transition to an inactive LFS-rich phase. Reweighting trajectories reveals a first-order phase transition in trajectory space between a normal liquid and a LFS-rich phase. We further find evidence of a purely dynamical transition in trajectory space.
  • Geometric frustration describes the inability of a local molecular arrangement, such as icosahedra found in metallic glasses and in model atomic glass-formers, to tile space. Local icosahedral order however is strongly frustrated in Euclidean space, which obscures any causal relationship with the observed dynamical slowdown. Here we relieve frustration in a model glass-forming liquid by curving 3-dimensional space onto the surface of a 4-dimensional hypersphere. For sufficient curvature, frustration vanishes and the liquid freezes in a fully icosahedral structure via a sharp `transition'. Frustration increases upon reducing the curvature, and the transition to the icosahedral state smoothens while glassy dynamics emerges. Decreasing the curvature leads to decoupling between dynamical and structural length scales and the decrease of kinetic fragility. This sheds light on the observed glass-forming behavior in the Euclidean space.
  • We consider a model of self-propelled dynamics for athermal active particles, where the non-equilibrium active forces are modelled by a Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. In the limit of no-driving force, the model reduces to the passive, Brownian dynamics of an atomistic glass forming fluid, the Wahnstr\"om binary mixture. The Wahnstr\"om mixture is known to show strong correlations between the emergence of slow dynamics and the formation of locally favoured structures based on icosahedra. Here, we study how the non-equilibrium forces affect the local structure of the system, and find that these strongly promote icosahedral order. The phases rich in local icosahedral order correspond to configurations of very low potential energy, suggesting that the non-equilibrium dynamics in the self propelled model can be effectively exploited to explore the potential energy surface of the binary mixture and have access to states that are difficult to attain using passive dynamics.
  • We consider the sedimentation of a colloidal gel under confinement in the direction of gravity. The confinement allows us to compare directly experiments and computer simulations, for the same system size in the vertical direction. The confinement also leads to qualitatively different behaviour compared to bulk systems: in large systems gelation suppresses sedimentation, but for small systems sedimentation is enhanced relative to non-gelling suspensions, although the rate of sedimentation is reduced when the strength of the attraction between the colloids is strong. We map interaction parameters between a model experimental system (observed in real space) and computer simulations. Remarkably, we find that when simulating the system using Brownian dynamics in which hydrodynamic interactions between the particles are neglected, we find that sedimentation occurs on the same timescale as the experiments, however the thickness of the "arms" of the gel is rather larger in the experiments, compared with the simulations. An analysis of local structure in the simulations showed similar behaviour to gelation in the absence of gravity.
  • The formation of colloidal gels is strongly dependent on the volume fraction of the system and the strength of the interactions between the colloids. Here we explore very dilute solutions by the means of numerical simulations, and show that, in the absence of hydrodynamic interactions and for sufficiently strong interactions, percolating colloidal gels can be realised at very low values of the volume fraction. Characterising the structure of the network of the arrested material we find that, when reducing the volume fraction, the gels are dominated by low-energy local structures, analogous to the isolated clusters of the interaction potential. Changing the strength of the interaction allows us to tune the compactness of the gel as characterised by the fractal dimension, with low interaction strength favouring more chain-like structures.
  • We investigate the effects of the reversal of the gravitational field onto a sedimented and partially crystallised suspension of nearly-hard sphere colloids. We analyse the structural changes that take place during the melting of the crystalline regions and the reorganisation and assembly of the sedimenting particles. Through a comparison with numerical simulation, we access the single-particle kinetics and identify the key structural mechanism in the competition between five-fold symmetric and cubic crystalline structures. With the use of a coarse-grained, discrete model, we reproduce the kinetic network of reactions underpinning crystallisation and highlight the main microscopic transitions.
  • For binary fluid mixtures of spherical particles in which the two species are sufficiently different in size, the dominant wavelength of oscillations of the pair correlation functions is predicted to change from roughly the diameter of the large species to that of the small species along a sharp crossover line in the phase diagram [C. Grodon, M. Dijkstra, R. Evans & R. Roth, J.Chem.Phys. 121, 7869 (2004)]. Using particle-resolved colloid experiments in 3d we demonstrate that crossover exists and that its location in the phase diagram is in quantitative agreement with the results of both theory and our Monte-Carlo simulations. In contrast with previous work [J. Baumgartl, R. Dullens, M. Dijkstra, R. Roth & C. Bechinger, Phys.Rev.Lett. 98, 198303 (2007)], where a correspondence was drawn between crossover and percolation of both species, in our 3d study we find that structural crossover is unrelated to percolation.
  • Geometric frustration is an approach to the glass transition based upon the consideration of locally favoured structures (LFS), which are geometric motifs which minimise the local free energy. Geometric frustration proposes that a transition to a crystalline state is frustrated because these LFS do not tile space. However, this concept is based on icosahedra which are not always the LFS for a given system. The LFS of the popular Kob-Andersen (KA) model glassformer is the bicapped square antiprism, which does tile space. Such an LFS-crystal is indeed realised in the $\mathrm{Al_{2}Cu}$ structure, which is predicted to be a low energy state for the KA model with a 2:1 composition. We therefore hypothesise that upon changing the composition in the KA model towards 2:1, geometric frustration may be progressively relieved, leading to larger and larger domains of LFS which would ultimately correspond to the $\mathrm{Al_{2}Cu}$ crystal. Remarkably, rather than an increase, upon changing composition we find a small decrease in the LFS population, and the system remains impervious to nucleation of LFS crystals. We suggest that this may be related to the composition of the LFS, as only a limited subset are compatible with the crystal. We further demonstrate that the $\mathrm{Al_{2}Cu}$ crystal will grow from a seed in the KA model with 2:1 composition and identify the melting temperature to be 0.447(2).
  • Charged colloids can behave as Yukawa systems, with similar phase behaviour. Using particle- resolved studies, we consider a system with an unusually long Debye screening length which forms crystals at low colloid volume fraction {\phi} ~ 0.01. We quantitatively compare this system with the Yukawa model and find that its freezing point is compatible with the theoretical prediction but that the crystal polymorph is not always that expected. In particular we find body-centred cubic crystals where face-centred cubic crystals are expected.
  • We discuss the growth process of a crystalline phase out of a metastable over-compressed liquid that is brought into contact with a crystalline substrate. The process is modeled by means of molecular dynamics. The particles interact via the Lennard-Jones potential and their motion is locally thermalized by Langevin dynamics. We characterize the relaxation process of the solid-liquid interface, showing that the growth speed is maximal for liquid densities above the solid coexistence density, and that the structural properties of the interface rapidly converge to equilibrium-like properties. In particular, we show that the off-equilibrium dynamic stiffness can be extracted using capillary wave theory arguments, even if the growth front moves fast compared to the typical diffusion time of the compressed liquid, and that the dynamic stiffness converges to the equilibrium stiffness in times much shorter than the diffusion time.
  • We review theoretical and simulational approaches to the description of equilibrium bulk crystal and interface properties as well as to the nonequilibrium processes of homogeneous and heterogeneous crystal nucleation for the simple model systems of hard spheres and Lennard-Jones particles. For the equilibrium properties of bulk and interfaces, density functional theories employing fundamental measure functionals prove to be a precise and versatile tool, as exemplified with a closer analysis of the hard sphere crystalliquid interface. A detailed understanding of the dynamic process of nucleation in these model systems nevertheless still relies on simulational approaches. We review bulk nucleation and nucleation at structured walls and examine in closer detail the influence of walls with variable strength on nucleation in the Lennard-Jones fluid. We find that a planar crystalline substrate induces the growth of a crystalline film for a large range of lattice spacings and interaction potentials. Only a strongly incommensurate substrate and a very weakly attractive substrate potential lead to crystal growth with a non-zero contact angle.
  • We study crystallization in a model system for eicosane (C20) by means of molecular dynamics simulation and we identify the microscopic mechanisms of homogeneous crystal nucleation and growth. For the nucleation process, we observe that chains first align and then straighten. Then the local density increases and finally the monomer units become ordered positionally. The subsequent crystal growth process is characterized by a sliding-in motion of the chains. Chains preferably attach to the crystalline cluster with one end and then move along the stems of already crystallized chains towards their final position. This process is cooperative, i.e. neighboring chains tend to get attached in clusters rather than independently
  • Many transport processes in nature take place on substrates, often considered as unidimensional lanes. These unidimensional substrates are typically non-static: affected by a fluctuating environment, they can undergo conformational changes. This is particularly true in biological cells, where the state of the substrate is often coupled to the active motion of macromolecular complexes, such as motor proteins on microtubules or ribosomes on mRNAs, causing new interesting phenomena. Inspired by biological processes such as protein synthesis by ribosomes and motor protein transport, we introduce the concept of localized dynamical sites coupled to a driven lattice gas dynamics. We investigate the phenomenology of transport in the presence of dynamical defects and find a novel regime characterized by an intermittent current and subject to severe finite-size effects. Our results demonstrate the impact of the regulatory role of the dynamical defects in transport, not only in biology but also in more general contexts.
  • Complex fluids in shear flow and biased dynamics in crowded environments exhibit counterintuitive features which are difficult to address both at theoretical level and by molecular dynamic simulations. To understand some of these features we study a schematic model of highly viscous liquid, the 2D Kob-Andersen kinetically constrained model, driven into non-equilibrium steady states by a uniform non-Hamiltonian force. We present a detailed numerical analysis of the microscopic behavior of the model, including transversal and longitudinal spatial correlations and dynamic heterogeneities. In particular, we show that at high particle density the transition from positive to negative resistance regimes in the current vs field relation can be explained via the emergence of nontrivial structures that intermittently trap the particles and slow down the dynamics. We relate such spatial structures to the current vs field relation in the different transport regimes.
  • In this article, we demonstrate that in a transport model of particles with kinetic constraints, long-lived spatial structures are responsible for the blocking dynamics and the decrease of the current at strong driving field. Coexistence between mobile and blocked regions can be anticipated by a first-order transition in the large deviation function for the current. By a study of the system under confinement, we are able to study finite-size effects and extract a typical length between mobile regions.
  • Kinetically Constrained Models (KCMs) have been widely studied in the context of glassy dynamics, focusing on the influence of dynamical constraints on the slowing down of the dynamics of a macroscopic system. In these models, it has been shown using the thermodynamic formalism for histories, that there is a coexistence between an active and an inactive phase. This coexistence can be described by a first-order transition, and a related discontinuity in the derivative of the large deviation function for the activity. We show that adding a driving field to a KCM model does not destroy this first-order transition for the activity. Moreover, a singularity is also found in the large deviation function of the current at large fields. We relate for the first time this property to microscopic structures, in particular the heterogeneous, intermittent dynamics of the particles, transient shear-banding and blocking walls. We describe both the shear-thinning and the shear-thickening regimes, and find that the behaviour of the current is well reproduced by a simple model.