• A recent proposal has shown that it is possible to perform linear-optics quantum computation using a ballistic generation of the lattice. Yet, due to the probabilistic generation of its cluster state, it is not possible to use the fault-tolerant Raussendorf lattice, which requires a lower failure rate during the entanglement-generation process. Previous work in this area showed proof-of-principle linear-optics quantum computation, while this paper presents an approach to it which is more practical, satisfying several key constraints. We develop a classical measurement scheme, that purifies a large faulty lattice to a smaller lattice with entanglement faults below threshold. A single application of this method can reduce the entanglement error rate to $7\%$ for an input failure rate of $25\%$. Thus, we can show that it is possible to achieve fault tolerance for ballistic methods.
  • Quantum coherence of superposed states, especially of entangled states, is indispensable for many quantum technologies. However, it is vulnerable to environmental noises, posing a fundamental challenge in solid-state systems including spin qubits. Here we show a scheme of entanglement engineering where pure dephasing assists the generation of quantum entanglement at distant sites in a chain of electron spins confined in semiconductor quantum dots. One party of an entangled spin pair, prepared at a single site, is transferred to the next site and then adiabatically swapped with a third spin using a transition across a multi-level avoided crossing. This process is accelerated by the noise-induced dephasing through a variant of the quantum Zeno effect, without sacrificing the coherence of the entangled state. Our finding brings insight into the spin dynamics in open quantum systems coupled to noisy environments, opening an avenue to quantum state manipulation utilizing decoherence effects.
  • Recent technological developments have made it increasingly easy to access the non-perturbative regimes of cavity quantum electrodynamics known as ultra or deep strong coupling, where the light-matter coupling becomes comparable to the bare modal frequencies. In this work, we address the adequacy of the broadly used single-mode cavity approximation to describe such regimes. We demonstrate that, in the non-perturbative light-matter coupling regimes, the single-mode models become unphysical, allowing for superluminal signalling. Moreover, considering the specific example of the quantum Rabi model, we show that the multi-mode description of the electromagnetic field, necessary to account for light propagation at finite speed, yields physical observables that differ radically from their single-mode counterparts already for moderate values of the coupling. Our multi-mode analysis also reveals phenomena of fundamental interest on the dynamics of the intracavity electric field, where a free photonic wavefront and a bound state of virtual photons are shown to coexist.
  • In the ultra-strong coupling regime of a light-matter system, the ground state exhibits non-trivial entanglement between the atom and photons. For the purposes of exploring the measurement and control of this ground state, here we analyze the dynamics of such an ultra-strongly-coupled system interacting with a driven nonlinear resonator acting as a measurement apparatus. Interestingly, although the coupling between the atom and the nonlinear resonator is much smaller than the typical energy scales of the ultra-strongly-coupled system, we show that we can generate a strong correlation between the nonlinear resonator and the light-matter system. A subsequent coarse- grained measurement on the nonlinear resonator significantly affects the light-matter system, and the phase of the light changes depending on the measurement results. Also, we investigate the conditions for when the nonlinear resonator can be entangled with the ultra-strongly coupled system, which is the mechanism that allows us to project the ground state of the ultra-strongly coupled system into a non-energy eigenstate.
  • We demonstrate that multipartite entanglement is able to characterize one-dimensional symmetry-protected topological order, which is witnessed by the scaling behavior of the quantum Fisher information of the ground state with respect to the spin operators defined in the dual lattice. We investigate an extended Kitaev chain with a $\mathbf{Z}$ symmetry identified equivalently by winding numbers and paired Majorana zero modes at each end. The topological phases with high winding numbers are detected by the scaling coefficient of the quantum Fisher information density with respect to generators in different dual lattices. Containing richer properties and more complex structures than bipartite entanglement, the dual multipartite entanglement of the topological state has promising applications in robust quantum computation and quantum metrology, and can be generalized to identify topological order in the Kitaev honeycomb model.
  • We discuss level splitting and sideband transitions induced by a modulated coupling between a superconducting quantum circuit and a nanomechanical resonator. First, we show how to achieve an unconventional time-dependent longitudinal coupling between a flux (transmon) qubit and the resonator. Considering a sinusoidal modulation of the coupling strength, we find that a first-order sideband transition can be split into two. Moreover, under the driving of a red-detuned field, we discuss the optical response of the qubit for a resonant probe field. We show that level splitting induced by modulating this longitudinal coupling can enable two-color electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), in addition to single-color EIT. In contrast to standard predictions of two-color EIT in atomic systems, we apply here only a single drive (control) field. The monochromatic modulation of the coupling strength is equivalent to employing two eigenfrequency-tunable mechanical resonators. Both drive-probe detuning for single-color EIT and the distance between transparent windows for two-color EIT, can be adjusted by tuning the modulation frequency of the coupling.
  • Quantum systems are affected by interactions with their environments, causing decoherence through two processes: pure dephasing and energy relaxation. For quantum information processing it is important to increase the coherence time of Josephson qubits and other artificial two-level atoms. We show theoretically that if the coupling between these qubits and a cavity field is longitudinal and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, the system is strongly protected against relaxation. Vice versa, if the coupling is transverse and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, the system is protected against pure dephasing. Taking advantage of the relaxation suppression, we show that it is possible to enhance their coherence time and use these qubits as quantum memories. Indeed, to preserve the coherence from pure dephasing, we prove that it is possible to apply dynamical decoupling. We also use an auxiliary atomic level to store and retrieve quantum information.
  • By coupling a Lambda-type quantum emitter to a chiral waveguide, in which the polarization of a photon is locked to its propagation direction, we propose a controllable photon-emitter interface for quantum networks. We show that this chiral system enables the SWAP gate and a hybrid-entangling gate between the emitter and a flying single photon. It also allows deterministic storage and retrieval of single-photon states with high fidelities and efficiencies. In short, this chirally coupled emitter-photon interface can be a critical building block toward a large-scale quantum network.
  • We propose a measure of quantum steerability, namely a convex steering monotone, based on the trace distance between a given assemblage and its corresponding closest assemblage admitting a local-hidden-state (LHS) model. We provide methods to estimate such a quantity, via lower and upper bounds, based on semidefinite programming. One of these upper bounds has a clear geometrical interpretation as a linear function of rescaled Euclidean distances in the Bloch sphere between the normalized quantum states of: (i) a given assemblage and (ii) an LHS assemblage. For a qubit-qubit quantum state, the above ideas also allow us to visualize various steerability properties of the state in the Bloch sphere via the so-called LHS surface. In particular, some steerability properties can be obtained by comparing such an LHS surface with a corresponding quantum steering ellipsoid. Thus, we propose a witness of steerability corresponding to the difference of the volumes enclosed by these two surfaces. This witness (which reveals the steerability of a quantum state) enables finding an optimal measurement basis, which can then be used to determine the proposed steering monotone (which describes the steerability of an assemblage) optimized over all mutually-unbiased bases.
  • We propose an experimentally feasible method for enhancing the atom-field coupling as well as the ratio between this coupling and dissipation (i.e., cooperativity) of two atoms in an optical cavity. Our method also enables the generation of steady-state nearly-maximal quantum entanglement. Our approach exploits optical parametric amplification to exponentially enhance the atom-cavity interaction and, hence, the cooperativity of the system, with the squeezing-induced fluctuation noise being completely eliminated. Thus, an effective cooperativity much larger than $100$ can be achieved even for modest values of a squeezing parameter. We demonstrate that the entanglement infidelity (which quantifies the deviation of the generated state from a maximally-entangled state) is exponentially smaller than the lower bound on the infidelities obtained in other dissipative entanglement preparations without applying squeezing. Thus, this infidelity can be arbitrarily small. Our generic method for enhancing atom-cavity cooperativities can be implemented in a wide range of physical systems, and it can provide diverse applications for quantum information processing based on entanglement.
  • Flatbands are distinguished in that they allow the distortion-free storage of compact localized states of tailorable shape. The reliable storage sojourn of these states is, however, limited in the presence of a disorder potential, which generically gives rise to an uncontrolled coupling into dispersive bands. Analyzing the cross-stitch lattice, we find that, while detuning flatband states from band intersections allows to suppress the direct decay into dispersive bands, disorder-induced state distortion gives rise to a delayed, dephasing-mediated decay, setting a finite lifetime for the reliable storage sojourn. Our analysis relies on the time-resolved treatment of disorder-averaged quantum systems in terms of quantum master equations.
  • Surface codes can protect quantum information stored in qubits from local errors as long as the per-operation error rate is below a certain threshold. Here we propose holonomic surface codes by harnessing the quantum holonomy of the system. In our scheme, the holonomic gates are built via auxiliary qubits rather than the auxiliary levels in multilevel systems used in conventional holonomic quantum computation. The key advantage of our approach is that the auxiliary qubits are in their ground state before and after each gate operation, so they are not involved in the operation cycles of surface codes. This provides an advantageous way to implement surface codes for fault-tolerant quantum computation.
  • The synchronization of the motion of microresonators has attracted considerable attention. Here we present theoretical methods to synchronize the chaotic motion of two optical cavity modes in an optomechanical system, in which one of the optical modes is strongly driven into chaotic motion and is coupled to another weakly-driven optical mode mediated by a mechanical resonator. In these optomechanical systems, we can obtain both complete and phase synchronization of the optical cavity modes in chaotic motion, starting from different initial states. We find that complete synchronization of chaos can be achieved in two identical cavity modes. In the strong-coupling small-detuning regime, we also {produce} phase synchronization of chaos between two nonidentical cavity modes.
  • We show that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond can produce a novel quantum hyperbolic metamaterial. We demonstrate that a hyperbolic dispersion relation in diamond with NV centers can be engineered and dynamically tuned by applying a magnetic field. This quantum hyperbolic metamaterial with a tunable window for the negative refraction allows for the construction of a superlens beyond the diffraction limit. In addition to subwavelength imaging, this NV-metamaterial can be used in spontaneous emission enhancement, heat transport and acoustics, analogue cosmology, and lifetime engineering. Therefore, our proposal interlinks the two hotspot fields, i.e., NV centers and metamaterials.
  • We present a method to implement two-phonon interactions between mechanical resonators and spin qubits in hybrid setups, and show that these systems can be applied for the dissipative generation of nonclassical mechanical states. In particular, we demonstrate that the implementation a two-phonon Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian under coherent driving of the qubit yields a dissipative phase transition with similarities to the one predicted in the model of the degenerate parametric oscillator: beyond a certain threshold in the driving amplitude, the driven-dissipative system sustains a steady state consisting of a "jumping cat", i.e., a Schr\"odinger cat undergoing random jumps between two phases. We consider realistic setups and show that, in samples within reach of current technology, the low rate at which jumps between Schr\"odinger cat states occur allows these to survive with fidelities $>0.99$ for longer than one milisecond, without the need of any particular protocol or preparation.
  • Near-unity energy transfer efficiency has been widely observed in natural photosynthetic complexes. This phenomenon has attracted broad interest from different fields, such as physics, biology, chemistry and material science, as it may offer valuable insights into efficient solar-energy harvesting. Recently, quantum coherent effects have been discovered in photosynthetic light harvesting, and their potential role on energy transfer has seen heated debate. Here, we perform an experimental quantum simulation of photosynthetic energy transfer using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We show that an N- chromophore photosynthetic complex, with arbitrary structure and bath spectral density, can be effectively simulated by a system with log2 N qubits. The computational cost of simulating such a system with a theoretical tool, like the hierarchical equation of motion, which is exponential in N, can be potentially reduced to requiring a just polynomial number of qubits N using NMR quantum simulation. The benefits of performing such quantum simulation in NMR are even greater when the spectral density is complex, as in natural photosynthetic complexes. These findings may shed light on quantum coherence in energy transfer and help to provide design principles for efficient artificial light harvesting.
  • The Hermiticity axiom of quantum mechanics guarantees that the energy spectrum is real and the time evolution is unitary (probability-preserving). Nevertheless, non-Hermitian but $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric Hamiltonians may also have real eigenvalues. Systems described by such effective $\mathcal {PT}$-symmetric Hamiltonians have been realized in experiments using coupled systems with balanced loss (dissipation) and gain (amplification), and their corresponding classical dynamics has been studied. A $\mathcal {PT}$-symmetric system emerging from a quantum dynamics is highly desirable, in order to understand what $\mathcal {PT}$-symmetry and the powerful mathematical and physical concepts around it will bring to the next generation of quantum technologies. Here, we address this need by proposing and studying a circuit-QED architecture that consists of two coupled resonators and two qubits (each coupled to one resonator). By means of external driving fields on the qubits, we are able to tune gain and losses in the resonators. Starting with the quantum dynamics of this system, we show the emergence of the $\mathcal {PT}$-symmetry via the selection of both driving amplitudes and frequencies. We engineer the system such that a non-number conserving dipole-dipole interaction emerges, introducing an instability at large coupling strengths. The $\mathcal {PT}$-symmetry and its breaking, as well as the predicted instability in this circuit-QED system can be observed in a transmission experiment.
  • The incoherent dynamical properties of open quantum systems are generically attributed to an ongoing correlation between the system and its environment. Here, we propose a novel way to assess the nature of these system-environment correlations by examining the system dynamics alone. Our approach is based on the possibility or impossibility to simulate open-system dynamics with Hamiltonian ensembles. As we show, such (im)possibility to simulate is closely linked to the system-environment correlations. We thus define the nonclassicality of open-system dynamics in terms of the nonexistence of a Hamiltonian-ensemble simulation. This classifies any nonunital open-system dynamics as nonclassical. We give examples for open-system dynamics that are unital and classical, as well as unital and nonclassical.
  • A quantum system can be driven by either sinusoidal, rectangular, or noisy signals. In the literature, these regimes are referred to as Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg-Majorana interferometry, latching modulation, and motional averaging, respectively. We demonstrate that these pronounced and interesting effects are also inherent in the dynamics of classical two-state systems. We discuss how such classical systems are realized using either mechanical, electrical, or optical resonators.
  • We describe a method to tune, in-situ, between transverse and longitudinal light-matter coupling in a hybrid circuit-QED device composed of an electron spin degree of freedom coupled to a microwave transmission line cavity. Our approach relies on periodic modulation of the coupling itself, such that in a certain frame the interaction is both amplified and either transverse, or, by modulating at two frequencies, longitudinal. The former realizes an effective simulation of certain aspects of the ultra-strong coupling regime, while the latter allows one to implement a longitudinal readout scheme even when the intrinsic Hamiltonian is transverse, and the individual spin or cavity frequencies cannot be changed. We analyze the fidelity of using such a scheme to measure the state of the electron spin degree of freedom, and argue that the longitudinal readout scheme can operate in regimes where the traditional dispersive approach fails.
  • In quantum-optics experiments with both natural and artificial atoms, the atoms are usually small enough that they can be approximated as point-like compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation they interact with. However, superconducting qubits coupled to a meandering transmission line, or to surface acoustic waves, can realize "giant artificial atoms" that couple to a bosonic field at several points which are wavelengths apart. Here, we study setups with multiple giant atoms coupled at multiple points to a one-dimensional (1D) waveguide. We show that the giant atoms can be protected from decohering through the waveguide, but still have exchange interactions mediated by the waveguide. Unlike in decoherence-free subspaces, here the entire multi-atom Hilbert space is protected from decoherence. This is not possible with "small" atoms. We further show how this decoherence-free interaction can be designed in setups with multiple atoms to implement, e.g., a 1D chain of atoms with nearest-neighbor couplings or a collection of atoms with all-to-all connectivity. This may have important applications in quantum simulation and quantum computing.
  • In the past 20 years, impressive progress has been made both experimentally and theoretically in superconducting quantum circuits, which provide a platform for manipulating microwave photons. This emerging field of superconducting quantum microwave circuits has been driven by many new interesting phenomena in microwave photonics and quantum information processing. For instance, the interaction between superconducting quantum circuits and single microwave photons can reach the regimes of strong, ultra-strong, and even deep-strong coupling. Many higher-order effects, unusual and less familiar in traditional cavity quantum electrodynamics with natural atoms, have been experimentally observed, e.g., giant Kerr effects, multi-photon processes, and single-atom induced bistability of microwave photons. These developments may lead to improved understanding of the counterintuitive properties of quantum mechanics, and speed up applications ranging from microwave photonics to superconducting quantum information processing. In this article, we review experimental and theoretical progress in microwave photonics with superconducting quantum circuits. We hope that this global review can provide a useful roadmap for this rapidly developing field.
  • Quantum confinement has made it possible to detect and manipulate single-electron charge and spin states. The recent focus on two-dimensional (2D) materials has attracted significant interests on possible applications to quantum devices, including detecting and manipulating either single-electron charging behavior or spin and valley degrees of freedom. However, the most popular model systems, consisting of tunable double-quantum-dot molecules, are still extremely difficult to realize in these materials. We show that an artificial molecule can be reversibly formed in atomically thin MoS2 sandwiched in hexagonal boron nitride, with each artificial atom controlled separately by electrostatic gating. The extracted values for coupling energies at different regimes indicate a single-electron transport behavior, with the coupling strength between the quantum dots tuned monotonically. Moreover, in the low-density regime, we observe a decrease of the conductance with magnetic field, suggesting the observation of Coulomb blockade weak anti-localization. Our experiments demonstrate for the first time the realization of an artificial quantum-dot molecule in a gated MoS2 van der Waals heterostructure, which could be used to investigate spin-valley physics. The compatibility with large-scale production, gate controllability, electron-hole bipolarity, and new quantum degrees of freedom in the family of 2D materials opens new possibilities for quantum electronics and its applications.
  • We analyze the propagation of quantum states in the presence of weak disorder. In particular, we investigate the reliable transmittance of quantum states, as potential carriers of quantum information, through disorder-perturbed waveguides. We quantify wave-packet distortion, backscattering, and disorder-induced dephasing, which all act detrimentally on transport, and identify conditions for reliable transmission. Our analysis relies on the treatment of the nonequilibrium dynamics of ensemble-averaged quantum states in terms of quantum master equations.
  • The traditional method for computation in either the surface code or in the Raussendorf model is the creation of holes or "defects" within the encoded lattice of qubits that are manipulated via topological braiding to enact logic gates. However, this is not the only way to achieve universal, fault-tolerant computation. In this work, we focus on the Lattice Surgery representation, which realizes transversal logic operations without destroying the intrinsic 2D nearest-neighbor properties of the braid-based surface code and achieves universality without defects and braid based logic. For both techniques there are open questions regarding the compilation and resource optimization of quantum circuits. Optimization in braid-based logic is proving to be difficult and the classical complexity associated with this problem has yet to be determined. In the context of lattice-surgery-based logic, we can introduce an optimality condition, which corresponds to a circuit with the lowest resource requirements in terms of physical qubits and computational time, and prove that the complexity of optimizing a quantum circuit in the lattice surgery model is NP-hard.