• We report the detection of molecular absorption lines at z=0.7645 towards the radio-loud QSO PMN 0134-0931. The CO J=2-1 and HCO+ J=2-1 lines are seen in absorption along two different lines of sight to lensed images of the background QSO. The lines of sight are separated by ~0.7", corresponding to 5 kpc in the lens plane. PMN 0134-0931 represents one out of only five known molecular absorption line systems at cosmologically significant distances. Moreover, it is also one of three such systems where the absorption occurs in a galaxy acting as a gravitational lens. The absorption lines through the two lines of sight are shifted by 215+/-8 km/s, possibly representing rotational motion in one of the lensing galaxies. The absorption profiles are wide, ~200 km/s, suggesting that the absorption occurs in a highly inclined disk galaxy with a flat rotation curve and a cloud-cloud velocity dispersion ~30 km/s. Gravitational lens models require two equal mass galaxies to account for the observed configuration of lensed images. The presence of two galaxies in close proximity means that they might be interacting and potentially merging and the kinematics of the molecular gas may not reflect ordered rotational motion. The column densities of both CO and HCO+ are normal for diffuse molecular gas towards one of the lensed images, but significantly higher towards the other. Also, the abundance ratio N(CO)/N(HCO+) is 2-3 times higher than in typical diffuse molecular gas. It is plausible that the second line of sight probes denser molecular gas than what is normally the case for absorption.
  • Although there is consensus that metal-rich stars in the Milky Way bulge are formed via secular evolution of the thin disc, the origin of their metal-poor counterparts is still under debate. Two different origins have been invoked for metal-poor stars: they might be classical bulge stars or stars formed via internal evolution of a massive thick disc. We use N-body simulations to calculate the kinematic signature given by the difference in the mean Galactocentric radial velocity ($\Delta\rm V_{\rm GC}$) between metal-rich stars ([Fe/H] $\ge$ 0) and moderately metal-poor stars (-1.0 $\le$ [Fe/H] $<$ 0) in two models, one containing a thin disc and a small classical bulge (B/D=0.1), and the other containing a thin disc and a massive centrally concentrated thick disc. We reasonably assume that thin-disk stars in each model may be considered as a proxy of metal-rich stars. Similarly, bulge stars and thick-disc stars may be considered as a proxy of metal-poor stars. We calculate $\Delta\rm V_{\rm GC}$ at different latitudes ($b=0^\circ$, $-2^\circ$, $-4^\circ$,$-6^\circ$, $-8^\circ$ and $-10^\circ$) and longitudes ($l=0^\circ$, $\pm5^\circ$, $\pm10^\circ$ and $\pm15^\circ$) and show that the $\Delta\rm V_{\rm GC}$ trends predicted by the two models are different. We compare the predicted results with ARGOS data and APOGEE DR13 data and show that moderately metal-poor stars are well reproduced with the co-spatial stellar discs model, which has a massive thick disc. Our results give more evidence against the scenario that most of the metal-poor stars are classical bulge stars. If classical bulge stars exists, most of them probably have metallicities [Fe/H] $<$ -1 dex, and their contribution to the mass of the bulge should be a small percentage of the total bulge mass.
  • We study how migration affects stars of a galaxy with a thin stellar disc and thicker stellar components. The simulated galaxy has a strong bar and lasting spiral arms. We find that the amplitude of the churning (change in angular momentum) is similar for thin and thick components, and of limited amplitude, and that stars of all components can be trapped at the corotation of the bar. At the exception of those stars trapped at the corotation, we find that stars that are far from their initial guiding radius are more likely so due to blurring rather than churning effects. We compare the simulation to orbits integration with a fixed gravitational potential rotating at a constant speed. In the latter case, stars trapped at corotation are churned periodically outside and inside the corotation radius, with a zero net average. However, as the bar speed of the simulated galaxy decreases and its corotation radius increases, stars trapped at corotation for several Gyrs can be churned outwards on average. We study the location of extreme migrators (stars experimenting the largest churning) and find that extreme migrators come from regions on the leading side of the effective potential local maxima.
  • New observations performed at IRAM Plateau de Bure reveal the absence of molecular gas next to Andromeda's black hole. We derived a 3 sigma upper limit on the molecular gas mass of 4300 Msol for the linewidth of 1000 km/s. This is compatible with infra-red observations which reveal a hole in dust emission next to the black hole. Some gas from stellar feedback is expected from the old eccentric stellar disc population, but it is not accreted close to the black hole. This absence of gas explains the absence of stellar formation observed in this region contrary to what is observed next to Sgr A* in the Milky Way. Either the gas has been swallowed by the black hole, or a feedback mechanism has pushed the gas outside the central 1 pc. Nevertheless, we detect a small clump of gas with a very small velocity dispersion at 2.4" from the black hole. It is probable that this clumpy gas is seen in projection, as it does not follow the rotation of the disk surrounding the black hole, its velocity dispersion is ten times smaller than the expected velocity gradient and the tidal shear from the black hole requires a gas density for this clump that is not compatible with our observations.
  • We present a detailed study of the molecular gas in the fast AGN-driven outflow in the nearby radio-loud Seyfert galaxy IC 5063. Using ALMA observations of a number of tracers (12CO(1-0), 12CO(2-1), 12CO(3-2), 13CO(2-1) and HCO+(4-3)), we map the differences in excitation, density and temperature of the gas. The results show that in the immediate vicinity of the radio jet, a fast outflow, with velocities up to 800 km/s, is occurring of which the gas has high excitation temperatures in the range 30-55 K, demonstrating the direct impact of the jet on the ISM. The relative brightness of the CO lines show that the outflow is optically thin. We estimate the mass of the molecular outflow to be 1.2 x 10^6 Msol and likely to be a factor 2-3 larger. This is similar to that of the outflow of atomic gas, but much larger than that of the ionised outflow, showing that the outflow is dominated by cold gas. The total mass outflow rate we estimate to be ~12 Msol/yr. The mass of the outflow is much smaller than the total gas mass of the ISM of IC 5063. Therefore, although the influence of the radio jet is very significant in the inner regions, globally speaking the impact will be very modest. We use RADEX modelling to explore the physical conditions of the molecular gas in the outflow. Models with the outflowing gas being quite clumpy give the most consistent results and our preferred solutions have kinetic temperatures in the range 20-100 K and densities between 10^5 and 10^6 cm^-3. The resulting pressures are 10^6-10^7.5 K cm^-3, about two orders of magnitude higher than in the outer quiescent disk. The results strongly suggest that the outflow is driven by the radio jet expanding into a clumpy medium, creating a cocoon of gas which is pushed away from the jet axis resulting in a lateral outflow, very similar to what is predicted by numerical simulations.
  • We have discovered large amounts of molecular gas, as traced by CO emission, in the ram pressure stripped gas tail of the Coma cluster galaxy D100 (GMP 2910), out to large distances of about 50 kpc. D100 has a 60 kpc long, strikingly narrow tail which is bright in X-rays and H{\alpha}. Our observations with the IRAM 30m telescope reveal in total ~ 10^9 M_sun of H_2 (assuming the standard CO-to-H_2 conversion) in several regions along the tail, thus indicating that molecular gas may dominate its mass. Along the tail we measure a smooth gradient in the radial velocity of the CO emission that is offset to lower values from the more diffuse H{\alpha} gas velocities. Such a dynamic separation of phases may be due to their differential acceleration by ram pressure. D100 is likely being stripped at a high orbital velocity >2200 km/s by (nearly) peak ram pressure. Combined effects of ICM viscosity and magnetic fields may be important for the evolution of the stripped ISM. We propose D100 has reached a continuous mode of stripping of dense gas remaining in its nuclear region. D100 is the second known case of an abundant molecular stripped-gas tail, suggesting that conditions in the ICM at the centers of galaxy clusters may be favorable for molecularization. From comparison with other galaxies, we find there is a good correlation between the CO flux and the H{\alpha} surface brightness in ram pressure stripped gas tails, over about 2 dex.
  • To shed light on the time evolution of local star formation episodes in M33, we study the association between 566 Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), identified through the CO (J=2-1) IRAM-all-disk survey, and 630 Young Stellar Cluster Candidates (YSCCs), selected via Spitzer-24~$\mu$m emission. The spatial correlation between YSCCs and GMCs is extremely strong, with a typical separation of 17~pc, less than half the CO(2--1) beamsize, illustrating the remarkable physical link between the two populations. GMCs and YSCCs follow the HI filaments, except in the outermost regions where the survey finds fewer GMCs than YSCCs, likely due to undetected, low CO-luminosity clouds. The GMCs have masses between 2$\times 10^4$ and 2$\times 10^6$ M$_\odot$ and are classified according to different cloud evolutionary stages: inactive clouds are 32$\%$ of the total, classified clouds with embedded and exposed star formation are 16$\%$ and 52$\%$ of the total respectively. Across the regular southern spiral arm, inactive clouds are preferentially located in the inner part of the arm, possibly suggesting a triggering of star formation as the cloud crosses the arm. Some YSCCs are embedded star-forming sites while the majority have GALEX-UV and H$\alpha$ counterparts with estimated cluster masses and ages. The distribution of the non-embedded YSCC ages peaks around 5~Myrs with only a few being as old as 8--10~Myrs. These age estimates together with the number of GMCs in the various evolutionary stages lead us to conclude that 14~Myrs is a typical lifetime of a GMC in M33, prior to cloud dispersal. The inactive and embedded phases are short, lasting about 4 and 2~Myrs respectively. This underlines that embedded YSCCs rapidly break out from the clouds and become partially visible in H$\alpha$ or UV long before cloud dispersal.
  • NGC 1808 is a nearby barred spiral galaxy which hosts young stellar clusters in a patchy circumnuclear ring with a radius of $\sim 240\,\mathrm{pc}$. In order to study the gaseous and stellar kinematics and the star formation properties of the clusters, we perform seeing-limited $H+K$-band near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy with SINFONI of the inner $\sim 600\,\mathrm{pc}$. From the $M_\mathrm{BH}-\sigma_*$ relation, we find a black hole mass of a few $10^7\,M_\odot$. We estimate the age of the young stellar clusters in the circumnuclear ring to be $\lesssim 10\,\mathrm{Myr}$. No age gradient along the ring is visible. However, the starburst age is comparable to the travel time along the ring, indicating that the clusters almost completed a full orbit along the ring during their life time. In the central $\sim 600\,\mathrm{pc}$, we find a hot molecular gas mass of $\sim 730\,M_\odot$ which, with standard conversion factors, corresponds to a large cold molecular gas reservoir of several $10^8\,M_\odot$, in accordance with CO measurements from the literature. The gaseous and stellar kinematics show several deviations from pure disc motion, including a circumnuclear disc and signs of a nuclear bar potential. In addition, we confirm streaming motions on $\sim 200\,\mathrm{pc}$ scale that have recently been detected in CO(1-0) emission. Due to our enhanced angular resolution of $<1\,\mathrm{arcsec}$, we find further streaming motion within the inner arcsecond, that have not been detected until now. Despite the flow of gas towards the centre, no signs for significant AGN activity are found. This raises the questions what determines whether the infalling gas will fuel an AGN or star formation.
  • NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) is one of the best example to study AGN-feedback in the local Universe. At 13.5 kpc from the galaxy, optical filaments with recent star formation are lying along the radio-jet direction. We used the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) to map the CO(2-1) emission all along the filaments structure. Molecular gas mass of 8.2x10^7 Msun was found over the 4.2 kpc-structure which represents about 3% of the total gas mass of the NGC 5128 cold gas content. Two dusty mostly molecular structures are identified, following the optical filaments. The region corresponds to the crossing of the radio jet with the northern HI shell, coming from a past galaxy merger. One filament is located at the border of the HI shell, while the other is entirely molecular, and devoid of HI gas. The molecular mass is comparable to the HI mass in the shell, suggesting a scenario where the atomic gas was shocked and transformed in molecular clouds by the radio jet. Comparison with combined FIR Herschel and UV GALEX estimation of star formation rates in the same regions leads to depletion times of more than 10 Gyr. The filaments are thus less efficient than discs in converting molecular gas into stars. Kinetic energy injection triggered by shocks all along the jet/gas interface is a possible process that appears to be consistent with MUSE line ratio diagnostics derived in a smaller region of the northern filaments. Whether the AGN is the sole origin of this energy input and what is the dominant (mechanical vs radiative) mode for this process is however still to be investigated.
  • The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can 'heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realised as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a timescale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrisations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalisation of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrised in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.
  • Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds - a departure from the "hot mode" accretion model - although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z=0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities can precipitate from this hot gas, producing a rain of cold clouds that fall toward the galaxy's centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that inhabits its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing "shadows" cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole in the galaxy centre, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it.
  • Centaurus A is the most nearby powerful AGN, widely studied at all wavelengths. Molecular gas has been found in the halo at a distance of ~20 kpc from the galaxy centre, associated with HI shells. The molecular gas lies inside some IR and UV bright star-forming filaments that have recently been observed in the direction of the radio jets. These archival data show that there is dust and very weak star formation on scales of hundreds of parsecs. On top of analysing combined archival data, we have performed searches of HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) emission with ATCA at the interaction of the northern filaments and the HI shell of Cen A. Measuring the dense gas is another indicator of star formation efficiency inside the filaments. However, we only derived upper limits of 1.6x10^3 K.km/s.pc^2 at 3 sigma in the synthesised beam of 3.1". We also compared the CO masses with the SFR estimates in order to measure a star formation efficiency. Using a standard conversion factor leads to long depletion times (7 Gyr). We then corrected the mass estimates from metallicity effect by using gas-to-dust mass ratio as a proxy. From MUSE data, we estimated the metallicity spread (0.4-0.8 Zsun) in the filament, corresponding to gas-to-dust ratios of ~200-400. The CO/H2 conversion ratio is corrected for low metallicity by a factor between 1.4 and 3.2. Such a low-metallicity correction leads to even more massive clouds with higher depletion times (16 Gyr). We finally present ALMA observations that detect 3 unresolved CO(2-1) clumps of size <37x21 pc and masses around 10^4 Msun. The velocity width of the CO emission line is ~10 km/s, leading to a rather high virial parameter. This is a hint of a turbulent gas probably powered by kinetic energy injection from the AGN jet/wind and leading to molecular gas reservoir not forming star efficiently.
  • The observed velocities of the gas in barred galaxies are a combination of the azimuthally-averaged circular velocity and non-circular motions, primarily caused by gas streaming along the bar. These non-circular flows must be accounted for before the observed velocities can be used in mass modeling. In this work, we examine the performance of the tilted-ring method and the DiskFit algorithm for transforming velocity maps of barred spiral galaxies into rotation curves (RCs) using simulated data. We find that the tilted-ring method, which does not account for streaming motions, under/over-estimates the circular motions when the bar is parallel/perpendicular to the projected major axis. DiskFit, which does include streaming motions, is limited to orientations where the bar is not-aligned with either the major or minor axis of the image. Therefore, we propose a method of correcting RCs based on numerical simulations of galaxies. We correct the RC derived from the tilted-ring method based on a numerical simulation of a galaxy with similar properties and projections as the observed galaxy. Using observations of NGC 3319, which has a bar aligned with the major axis, as a test case, we show that the inferred mass models from the uncorrected and corrected RCs are significantly different. These results show the importance of correcting for the non-circular motions and demonstrate that new methods of accounting for these motions are necessary as current methods fail for specific bar alignments.
  • Gas can be violently stripped from their galaxy disks in rich clusters, and be dispersed over 100kpc-scale tails or plumes. Young stars have been observed in these tails, suggesting they are formed in situ. This will contribute to the intracluster light, in addition to tidal stripping of old stars. We want to quantify the efficiency of intracluster star formation. We present CO(1--0) and CO(2--1) observations, made with the IRAM-30m telescope, towards the ram-pressure stripped tail northeast of NGC4388 in Virgo. HII regions found all along the tails, together with dust patches have been targeted. We detect molecular gas in 4 positions along the tail, with masses between 7x10$^5$ to 2x10$^6$ M$_\odot$. Given the large distance from the NGC 4388 galaxy, the molecular clouds must have formed in situ, from the HI gas plume. We compute the relation between surface densities of star formation and molecular gas in these regions, and find that the star formation has very low efficiency. The corresponding depletion time of the molecular gas can be up to 500 Gyr and more. Since this value exceeds a by far Hubble time, this gas will not be converted into stars, and will stay in a gaseous phase to join the intracluster medium.
  • SKA is a new technology radio-telescope array, about two orders of magnitude more sensitive and rapid in sky surveys than present instruments. It will probe the dark age of the universe, just afer recombination, and during the epoch of reionisation (z=6-15); it will be the unique instrument to map the atomic gas in high redshift galaxies, and determine the amount and distribution of dark matter in the early universe. Not only it will detect and measure the redshifts of billions of galaxies up to z=2, but also it will discover and monitor around 20 000 pulsars in our Milky Way. The timing of pulsars will trace the stretching of space, able to detect gravitational waves. Binary pulsars will help to test gravity in strong fields, and probe general relativity. These exciting perspectives will become real beyond 2020.
  • We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star forming clouds and filaments in the central ($< 50$ kpc) regions of 16 low redshift ($z<0.3$) cool core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). New Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of far ultraviolet continuum emission from young ($\sim 10$ Myr), massive ($> 5$ \Msol) stars reveals filamentary and clumpy morphologies, which we quantify by means of structural indices. The FUV data are compared with X-ray, Ly$\alpha$, narrowband H$\alpha$, broadband optical/IR, and radio maps, providing a high spatial resolution atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot ($\sim10^{7-8}$ K) and warm ionised ($\sim 10^4$ K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright AGN outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend toward and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed {\it in situ} by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations in which the AGN powers a self-regulating rain of thermally unstable star forming clouds that precipitate from the hot atmosphere. In this model, precipitation triggers where the cooling-to- freefall time ratio is $t_{\mathrm{cool}}/t_{\mathrm{ff}}\sim 10$. This condition is roughly met at the maxmial projected FUV radius for more than half of our sample, and clustering about this ratio is stronger for sources with higher star formation rates.
  • We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68% plausible intervals from them. The 68% plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the star formation rates available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition rates (the former are factors of 4 to 50 lower than the latter), implying a picture where the cooling of the ICM is a contributing factor to star formation in cool-core BCGs. We find that 9 out of 10 BCGs have been experiencing starbursts since 6 Gyr ago. While four out of 9 BCGs seem to require continuous SFRs, 5 out of 9 seem to require periodic star formation on intervals ranging from 20 Myr to 200 Myr. This time scale is similar to the cooling-time of the ICM in the central (< 5 kpc) regions.
  • This White Paper presents the scientific motivations for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) on the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The MOS case draws on all fields of contemporary astronomy, from extra-solar planets, to the study of the halo of the Milky Way and its satellites, and from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies out to observations of the earliest 'first-light' structures in the partially-reionised Universe. The material presented here results from thorough discussions within the community over the past four years, building on the past competitive studies to agree a common strategy toward realising a MOS capability on the E-ELT. The cases have been distilled to a set of common requirements which will be used to define the MOSAIC instrument, entailing two observational modes ('high multiplex' and 'high definition'). When combined with the unprecedented sensitivity of the E-ELT, MOSAIC will be the world's leading MOS facility. In analysing the requirements we also identify a high-multiplex MOS for the longer-term plans for the E-ELT, with an even greater multiplex (>1000 targets) to enable studies of large-scale structures in the high-redshift Universe. Following the green light for the construction of the E-ELT the MOS community, structured through the MOSAIC consortium, is eager to realise a MOS on the E-ELT as soon as possible. We argue that several of the most compelling cases for ELT science, in highly competitive areas of modern astronomy, demand such a capability. For example, MOS observations in the early stages of E-ELT operations will be essential for follow-up of sources identified by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In particular, multi-object adaptive optics and accurate sky subtraction with fibres have both recently been demonstrated on sky, making fast-track development of MOSAIC feasible.
  • Evidence of AGN interaction with the IGM is observed in some galaxies and many cool core clusters. Radio jets are suspected to dig large cavities into the surrounding gas. In most cases, very large optical filaments are seen around the central galaxy. The origin of these filaments is still not understood. Star-forming regions are sometimes observed inside the filaments and are interpreted as evidence of positive feedback. Cen A is a nearby galaxy with huge optical filaments aligned with the AGN radio-jet direction. We searched for line ratio variations along the filaments, kinematic evidence of shock-broadend line widths, and large-scale dynamical structures. We observed a 1'x1' region around the inner filament of Cen A with MUSE on the VLT during Science Verification. The brightest lines detected are the Halpha, [NII], [OIII] and [SII]. MUSE shows that the filaments are made of clumpy structures inside a more diffuse medium aligned with the radio-jet axis. We find evidence of shocked shells surrounding the star-forming clumps from the line profiles, suggesting that the star formation is induced by shocks. The clump line ratios are best explained by a composite of shocks and star formation illuminated by a radiation cone from the AGN. We also report a previously undetected large arc-like structure: three streams running perpendicular to the main filament; they are kinematically, morphologically, and excitationally distinct. The clear difference in the excitation of the arcs and clumps suggests that the arcs are very likely located outside of the radiation cone and match the position of the filament only in projection. The three arcs are most consistent with neutral material swept along by a backflow of the jet plasma from the AGN outburst that is ionised through a diffuse radiation field with a low-ionisation parameter that continues to excite gas away from the radiation cone.
  • A short 30 minute ALMA observation of the early-type galaxy NGC 5044, which resides at the center of an X-ray bright group with a moderate cooling flow, has detected 24 molecular structures within the central 2.5 kpc. The masses of the molecular structures vary from 3e5 to 1e7 Mo3 and the CO(2-1) linewidths vary from 15 to 65 km/s. Given the large CO(2-1) linewidths, the observed structures are likely giant molecular associations (GMAs) and not individual molecular clouds (GMCs). Only a few of the GMAs are spatially resolved with the cycle 0 ALMA beam and the average density of these GMAs yields a GMC volume filling factor of about 15%. The observed masses of the resolved GMAs are insufficient for them to be gravitationally bound, however, the most massive GMA does contain a less massive component with a linewidth of 5.5 km/s (typical of an individual virialized GMC). We also show that the GMAs cannot be pressure confined by the hot gas. Given the observed CO(2-1) linewidths of the GMAs (i.e., the velocity dispersion of the embedded GMCs) they will likely disperse on a timescale of about 12 Myr, which is less than the central cooling time of the hot gas, so the embedded GMCs within a GMA must condense out of the hot gas at the same time and arise from local concentrations of thermally unstable parcels of hot gas. There are no indications of any disk-like molecular structures and all indications suggest that the molecular gas follows ballistic trajectories after condensing out of the thermally unstable hot gas. The 230 GHz luminosity of the central continuum source is 500 times greater than its low frequency radio luminosity and probably reflects a recent accretion event by the central supermassive black hole. The spectrum of the central continuum source also exhibits an absorption feature.
  • We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) H- and K-band European Southern Observatory SINFONI integral field spectroscopy (IFS) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1433. We present emission and absorption line measurements in the central kpc of NGC 1433. We detect a narrow Balmer line and several H2 lines. We find that the stellar continuum peaks in the optical and NIR in the same position, indicating that there is no covering of the center by a nuclear dust lane. A strong velocity gradient is detected in all emission lines at that position. The position angle of this gradient is at 155\deg whereas the galactic rotation is at a position angle of 201\deg. Our measures of the molecular hydrogen lines, hydrogen recombination lines, and [Feii] indicate that the excitation at the nucleus is caused by thermal excitation, i.e. shocks which can be associated with active galactic nuclei emission, supernovae or outflows. The line ratios [Feii]/Pa{\beta} and H2/Br{\gamma} show a Seyfert to LINER identification of the nucleus. The stellar continuum is dominated by spectral signatures of red-giant M stars. The stellar line-of-sight velocity follows the galactic field whereas the light continuum follows the nuclear bar. The dynamical center of NGC 1433 coincides with the optical and NIR center of the galaxy and the black hole position. Within the central arcsecond, the molecular hydrogen and the 12CO(3-2) emissions - observed in the NIR and in the sub-millimeter with SINFONI and ALMA, respectively - are indicative for a nuclear outflow originating from the galaxy's SMBH. A small circum nuclear disk cannot be fully excluded. Derived gravitational torques show that the nuclear bar is able to drive gas inwards to scales where viscosity torques and dynamical friction become important. The black hole mass derived using stellar velocity dispersion is 10^7 M_sun.
  • For the first time, we reveal large amounts of cold molecular gas in a ram pressure stripped tail, out to a large, intracluster distance from the galaxy. With the APEX telescope we have detected 12CO(2-1) emission corresponding to more than 10^9 Msun of H_2 in three Ha bright regions along the tail of the Norma cluster galaxy ESO 137-001, out to a projected distance of 40 kpc from the disk. ESO 137-001 has an 80 kpc long and bright X-ray tail associated with a shorter (40 kpc) and broader tail of numerous star-forming H II regions. The amount of about 1.5x10^8 Msun of H_2 found in the most distant region is similar to molecular masses of tidal dwarf galaxies, though the standard Galactic CO-to-H_2 factor could overestimate the H_2 content. Along the tail, we find the amount of molecular gas to drop, while masses of the X-ray emitting and diffuse ionized components stay roughly constant. Moreover, the amounts of hot and cold gas are large and similar, and together nearly account for the missing gas from the disk. We find a very low star formation efficiency (tau > 10^10 yr) in the stripped gas in ESO 137-001 and suggest that this is due to a low average gas density in the tail, or turbulent heating of the interstellar medium that is induced by a ram pressure shock. The unprecedented bulk of observed H_2 in the ESO 137-001 tail suggests that some stripped gas may survive ram pressure stripping in the molecular phase.
  • In the present universe, the gas is a minor component of giant galaxies, and its dominant phase is atomic (HI). During galaxy evolution in cosmic times, models predict that gas fractions were much higher in galaxies, and gas phases could be more balanced between molecular (H2) and atomic (HI). This gaseous evolution is certainly a key factor to explain the cosmic evolution of the star formation rate density. Star formation efficiency might also vary with redshift, and the relative importance of these factors is not yet well known. Our current knowledge of cosmic evolution of gas from molecular observations at high-z is reviewed and confronted to simulations.
  • We report on two regularly rotating galaxies at redshift z=2, using high resolution spectra of the bright [CII] 158 micron emission line from the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. Both SDSS090122.37+181432.3 ("S0901") and SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 ("the Clone") are strongly lensed and show the double-horned line profile that is typical of rotating gas disks. Using a parametric disk model to fit the emission line profiles, we find that S0901 has a rotation speed v sin(i) = 120 +/- 7 km/s and gas velocity dispersion sigma < 23 km/s. The best fitting model for the Clone is a rotationally supported disk having v sin(i) = 79 +/- 11 km/s and sigma < 4km/s. However the Clone is also consistent with a family of dispersion-dominated models having sigma = 92 +/- 20 km/s. Our results showcase the potential of the [CII] line as a kinematic probe of high redshift galaxy dynamics: [CII] is bright; accessible to heterodyne receivers with exquisite velocity resolution; and traces dense star-forming interstellar gas. Future [CII] line observations with ALMA would offer the further advantage of spatial resolution, allowing a clearer separation between rotation and velocity dispersion.
  • We report ALMA and SMA observations of the luminous infrared merger NGC 3256, the most luminous galaxy within z=0.01. Both of the two merger nuclei separated by 5" (0.8 kpc) on the sky have a compact concentration of molecular gas, i.e., nuclear disks with Sigma_mol > 10^3 Msun pc^-2. The one at the northern nucleus is face-on while the southern nuclear disk is almost edge-on. The northern nucleus is more massive and has molecular arcs and spiral arms around. The high-velocity molecular gas previously found in the system is resolved to two molecular outflows associated with each of the two nuclei. The molecular outflow from the northern nuclear disk is part of a starburst-driven superwind seen nearly pole on. Its maximum velocity is >750 km/s and its mass outflow rate is estimated to be > 60 Msun/yr for a conversion factor N_{H_2}/I_{CO(1-0)}=1x10^20 cm^-2/(K km/s). The outflow from the southern nucleus is a highly collimated bipolar molecular jet seen nearly edge-on. Its line-of-sight velocity increases with distance out to 300 pc from the southern nucleus. Its maximum de-projected velocity is ~2000 km/s for the estimated inclination and should exceed 1000 km/s even allowing for its uncertainty. The mass outflow rate is estimated to be >50 Msun/yr for this outflow. There are possible signs that this southern outflow has been driven by a bipolar radio jet from an AGN that became inactive very recently. The sum of these outflow rates, although subject to the uncertainty in the molecular mass estimate, either exceeds or compares to the total star formation rate in NGC 3256. The feedback from nuclear activities in the form of molecular outflows is therefore significant in the gas consumption budget, and hence evolution, of this luminous infrared galaxy. (abridged)