• AX J1745.6-2901 is an eclipsing low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) in the Galactic Centre (GC). It shows significant X-ray excess emission during the eclipse phase, and its eclipse light curve shows an asymmetric shape. We use archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations to study the origin of these peculiar X-ray eclipsing phenomena. We find that the shape of the observed X-ray eclipse light curves depends on both photon energy and the shape of the source extraction region, and also shows differences between the two instruments. By performing detailed simulations for the time-dependent X-ray dust scattering halo, as well as directly modelling the observed eclipse and non-eclipse halo profiles of AX J1745.6-2901, we obtained solid evidence that its peculiar eclipse phenomena are indeed caused by the X-ray dust scattering in multiple foreground dust layers along the line-of-sight (LOS). The apparent dependence on the instruments is caused by different instrumental point-spread-functions. Our results can be used to assess the influence of dust scattering in other eclipsing X-ray sources, and raise the importance of considering the timing effects of dust scattering halo when studying the variability of other X-ray sources in the GC, such as Sgr A*. Moreover, our study of halo eclipse reinforces the existence of a dust layer local to AX J1745.6-2901 as reported by Jin et al. (2017), as well as identifying another dust layer within a few hundred parsecs to Earth, containing up to several tens of percent LOS dust, which is likely to be associated with the molecular clouds in the Solar neighbourhood. The remaining LOS dust is likely to be associated with the molecular clouds located in the Galactic disk in-between.
  • AX J1745.6-2901 is an X-ray binary located at only 1.45 arcmin from Sgr A*, showcasing a strong X-ray dust scattering halo. We combine Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to study the halo around this X-ray binary. Our study shows two major thick dust layers along the line of sight (LOS) towards AX J1745.6-2901. The LOS position and $N_{H}$ of these two layers depend on the dust grain models with different grain size distribution and abundances. But for all the 19 dust grain models considered, dust Layer-1 is consistently found to be within a fractional distance of 0.11 (mean value: 0.05) to AX J1745.6-2901 and contains only (19-34)% (mean value: 26%) of the total LOS dust. The remaining dust is contained in Layer-2, which is distributed from the Earth up to a mean fractional distance of 0.64. A significant separation between the two layers is found for all the dust grain models, with a mean fractional distance of 0.31. Besides, an extended wing component is discovered in the halo, which implies a higher fraction of dust grains with typical sizes $\lesssim$ 590 \AA\ than considered in current dust grain models. Assuming AX J1745.6-2901 is 8 kpc away, dust Layer-2 would be located in the Galactic disk several kpc away from the Galactic Centre (GC). The dust scattering halo biases the observed spectrum of AX J1745.6-2901 severely in both spectral shape and flux, and also introduces a strong dependence on the size of the instrumental point spread function and the source extraction region. We build Xspec models to account for this spectral bias, which allow us to recover the intrinsic spectrum of AX J1745.6-2901 free from dust scattering opacity. If dust Layer-2 also intervenes along the LOS to Sgr A* and other nearby GC sources, a significant spectral correction for the dust scattering opacity would be necessary for all these GC sources.
  • We have carried out a study of the X-ray properties of the supernova remnant (SNR) population in M33 with XMM-Newton, comprising deep observations of 8 fields in M33 covering all of the area within the D$_{25}$ contours, and with a typical luminosity of 7.1$\times$10$^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (0.2-2.0 keV) . Here we report our work to characterize the X-ray properties of the previously identified SNRs in M33, as well as our search for new X-ray detected SNRs. With our deep observations and large field of view we have detected 105 SNRs at the 3$\sigma$ level, of which 54 SNRs are newly detected in X-rays, and three are newly discovered SNRs. Combining XMM-Newton data with deep Chandra survey data allows detailed spectral fitting of 15 SNRs, for which we have measured temperatures, ionization timescales, and individual abundances. This large sample of SNRs allows us to construct an X-ray luminosity function, and compare its shape to luminosity functions from host galaxies of differing metallicities and star formation rates to look for environmental effects on SNR properties. We conclude that while metallicity may play a role in SNR population characteristics, differing star formation histories on short timescales, and small-scale environmental effects appear to cause more significant differences between X-ray luminosity distributions. In addition, we analyze the X-ray detectability of SNRs, and find that in M33 SNRs with higher [SII]/H$\alpha$ ratios, as well as those with smaller galactocentric distances, are more detectable in X-rays.
  • We report the timing analysis results of X-ray pulsars from a recent deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We have analyzed a total exposure of 1.4 Ms from 31 observations over a 1.2 deg$^2$ region in the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program. Using the Lomb-Scargle and epoch folding techniques, we have detected periodic modulations from 20 pulsars and a new candidate pulsar. The survey also covers 11 other pulsars with no clear sign of periodic modulation. The 0.5-8 keV X-ray luminosity ($L_X$) of the pulsars ranges from $10^{34}$ to $10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$ at 60 kpc. All the Chandra sources with $L_X$ $\gtrsim 4 \times 10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ exhibit X-ray pulsations. The X-ray spectra of the SMC pulsars (and high mass X-ray binaries) are in general harder than those of the SMC field population. All but SXP~8.02 can be fitted by an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of $\Gamma$ $\lesssim$ 1.5. The X-ray spectrum of the known magnetar SXP~8.02 is better fitted with a two-temperature blackbody model. Newly measured pulsation periods of SXP~51.0, SXP~214 and SXP~701 are significantly different from the previous XMM-Newton and RXTE measurements. This survey provides a rich data set for energy-dependent pulse profile modeling. Six pulsars show an almost eclipse-like dip in the pulse profile. Phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals diverse spectral variation during pulsation cycle: e.g., for an absorbed power-law model, some exhibit an (anti)-correlation between absorption and X-ray flux, while others show more intrinsic spectral variation.
  • Context. About 120 Be/X-ray binaries (BeXBs) are known in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC); about half of them are pulsating with periods from a few to hundreds of seconds. SXP 1323 is one of the longest-period pulsars known in this galaxy. Aims. SXP 1323 is in the field of view of a large set of calibration observations that we analyse systematically, focusing on the time analysis, in search of periodic signals. Methods. We analyse all available X-ray observations of SXP 1323 from Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and Chandra, in the time range from 1999 to the end of 2016. We perform a Lomb-Scargle periodogram search in the band 2.5-10 keV on all observations to detect the neutron star spin period and constrain its long-term evolution. We also perform an orbital period search on the long-term light curve, merging all datasets. Results. We report the discovery of a 26.188+-0.045 d period analysing data from Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and Chandra, which confirms the optical period derived from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) data. If this corresponds to the orbital period, this would be very short with respect to what is expected from the spin/orbital period relationship. We furthermore report on the spin period evolution in the last years. The source is spinning-up with an average rate of Pdot/P of 0.018 yr-1, decreasing from 1340 to 1100 s, in the period from 2006 to the end of 2016, which is also extreme with respect to the other Be/X-ray pulsars. From 2010 to the end of 2014, the pulse period is not clearly detectable, although the source was still bright. Conclusions. SXP 1323 is a peculiar BeXB due to its long pulse period, rapid spin-up for several years, and short orbital period. A continuous monitoring of the source in the next years is necessary to establish the long-term behaviour of the spin period.
  • The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) hosts a large number of high-mass X-ray binaries, and in particular of Be/X-ray Binaries (BeXRBs; neutron stars orbiting OBe-type stars), offering a unique laboratory to address the effect of metalicity. One key property of their optical companion is H{\alpha} in emission, which makes them bright sources when observed through a narrow-band H{\alpha} filter. We performed a survey of the SMC Bar and Wing regions using wide-field cameras (WFI@MPG/ESO and MOSAIC@CTIO/Blanco) in order to identify the counterparts of the sources detected in our XMM-Newton survey of the same area. We obtained broad-band R and narrow-band H{\alpha} photometry, and identified ~10000 H{\alpha} emission sources down to a sensitivity limit of 18.7 mag (equivalent to ~B8 type Main Sequence stars). We find the fraction of OBe/OB stars to be 13% down to this limit, and by investigating this fraction as a function of the brightness of the stars we deduce that H{\alpha} excess peaks at the O9-B2 spectral range. Using the most up-to-date numbers of SMC BeXRBs we find their fraction over their parent population to be ~0.002-0.025 BeXRBs/OBe, a direct measurement of their formation rate.
  • We construct the most complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) in any galaxy - the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) SNR sample. We study their various properties such as spectral index ($\alpha$), size and surface-brightness. We suggest an association between the spatial distribution, environment density of LMC SNRs and their tendency to be located around supergiant shells. We find evidence that the 16 known type Ia LMC SNRs are expanding in a lower density environment compared to the Core-Collapse (CC) type. The mean diameter of our entire population (74) is 41 pc, which is comparable to nearby galaxies. We didn't find any correlation between the type of SN explosion, ovality or age. The $N(<D)$ relationship of $a={0.96}$ implies that the randomised diameters are readily mimicking such an exponent. The rate of SNe occurring in the LMC is estimated to be $\sim$1 per 200 yr. The mean $\alpha$ of the entire LMC SNR population is $\alpha=-0.52$, which is typical of most SNRs. However, our estimates show a clear flattening of the synchrotron $\alpha$ as the remnants age. As predicted, our CC SNRs sample are significantly brighter radio emitters than the type Ia remnants. We also estimate the $\Sigma - D$ relation for the LMC to have a slope $\sim3.8$ which is comparable with other nearby galaxies. We also find the residency time of electrons in the galaxy ($4.0-14.3$ Myr), implying that SNRs should be the dominant mechanism for the production and acceleration of CRs.
  • We constrain the X-ray properties of the nearby $(360\,{\rm pc})$, old ($5\,{\rm Myr}$) pulsar B1133+16 with $\sim 100\,{\rm ks}$ effective exposure time by {\it XMM-Newton}. The observed pulsar flux in the 0.2-3 keV energy range is $\sim 10^{-14} \, {\rm erg \, cm}^{-2} \, {\rm s}^{-1}$, which results in the recording of $\sim 600$ source counts with the EPIC pn and MOS detectors. The X-ray radiation is dominated by nonthermal radiation and is well described by both a single power-law model (PL) and a sum of blackbody and power-law emission (BB+PL). The BB+PL model results in a spectral photon index $\Gamma=2.4^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$ and a nonthermal flux in the 0.2-3 keV energy range of $(7\pm 2) \times 10^{-15}\, {\rm erg \, cm}^{-2} \, {\rm s}^{-1}$. The thermal emission is consistent with the blackbody emission from a small hot spot with a radius of $R_{\rm pc} \approx 14^{+7}_{-5} \, {\rm m}$ and a temperature of $T_{\rm s} = 2.9^{+0.6}_{-0.4} \, {\rm MK}$. Assuming that the hot spot corresponds to the polar cap of the pulsar, we can use the magnetic flux conservation law to estimate the magnetic field at the surface $B_{\rm s} \approx 3.9 \times 10^{14} \, {\rm G}$. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the partially screened gap model, which assumes the existence of small-scale surface magnetic field structures in the polar cap region.
  • Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), SXP214 is an X-ray pulsar in a high mass X-ray binary system with a Be-star companion. A recent survey of the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary program found the source in a transition when the X-ray flux was on a steady rise. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram revealed a pulse period of 211.49 +/- 0.42 s, which is significantly (>5sigma) shorter than the previous measurements with XMM-Newton and RXTE. This implies that the system has gone through sudden spin-up episodes recently. The pulse profile shows a sharp eclipse-like feature with a modulation amplitude of >95%. The linear rise of the observed X-ray luminosity from <~2x to 7x10^35 erg s^-1 is correlated with steady softening of the X-ray spectrum, which can be described by the changes in the local absorption from N_H ~ 10^24 to <~10^20 cm^-2 for an absorbed power-law model. The soft X-ray emission below 2 keV was absent in the early part of the observation when only the pulsating hard X-ray component was observed, whereas at later times both soft and hard X-ray components were observed pulsating. A likely explanation is that the neutron star was initially hidden in the circumstellar disk of the companion, and later came out of the disk with the accreted material that continued fueling the observed pulsation.
  • X-ray emission from Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) is crucial to understand star formation. A very limited amount of X-ray results is available for the protostellar (ClassI) phase. A systematic search of transient X-ray phenomena combined with a careful evaluation of the evolutionary stage offer a widely unexplored window to our understanding of YSOs X-ray properties. Within the EXTraS project, a search for transients and variability in the whole XMM-Newton archive, we discover transient X-ray emission consistent with ISO-Oph 85, a strongly embedded YSO in the rho Ophiuchi region, not detected in previous time-averaged X-ray studies. We extract an X-ray light curve for the flare and determine its spectral parameters from XMM-Newton/EPIC (European Photon Imaging Camera) data using quantile analysis. The X-ray flare ($2500\,s$), the only one detected in the XMM-Newton archive for ISO-Oph 85, has a luminosity of $LogL_X[erg/s]=31.1$ and a spectrum consistent with a highly-absorbed one-component thermal model ($N_H=1.0^{+1.2}_{-0.5}10^{23}\,cm^{-2}$, $kT=1.15^{+2.35}_{-0.65}\,keV)$. We set an upper limit of $LogL_X[erg/s]<29.5$ to the quiescent X-ray luminosity. We build a SED with IR to mm photometry drawn from literature and mid-IR Spitzer and sub-mm Herschel photometry analysed by us, and compare it with pre-computed models. The sub-mm emission peak in the Herschel data suggests that the object is a ClassI protostar. However, the Herschel/IR position offset is larger than for other YSOs in the region, leaving some doubt on the association. This is the first X-ray flare from a YSO recognised as a candidate ClassI YSO via the analysis of its complete SED. This work shows how the analysis of the whole SED is fundamental for the classification of YSOs, and how the X-ray source detection techniques we developed can open a new era in time-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission from stars.
  • The last comprehensive catalogue of high-mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was published about ten years ago. Since then new such systems were discovered, mainly by X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton. For the majority of the proposed HMXBs in the SMC no X-ray pulsations were discovered as yet, and unless other properties of the X-ray source and/or the optical counterpart confirm their HMXB nature, they remain only candidate HMXBs. From a literature search we collected a catalogue of 148 confirmed and candidate HMXBs in the SMC and investigated their properties to shed light on their real nature. Based on the sample of well-established HMXBs (the pulsars), we investigated which observed properties are most appropriate for a reliable classification. We defined different levels of confidence for a genuine HMXB based on spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray sources and colour-magnitude diagrams from the optical to the infrared of their likely counterparts. We also took the uncertainty in the X-ray position into account. We identify 27 objects that probably are misidentified because they lack an infrared excess of the proposed counterpart. They were mainly X-ray sources with a large positional uncertainty. This is supported by additional information obtained from more recent observations. Our catalogue comprises 121 relatively high-confidence HMXBs (the vast majority with Be companion stars). About half of the objects show X-ray pulsations, while for the rest no pulsations are known as yet. A comparison of the two subsamples suggests that long pulse periods in excess of a few 100 s are expected for the "non-pulsars", which are most likely undetected because of aperiodic variability on similar timescales and insufficiently long X-ray observations. (abbreviated)
  • Aims. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the evolved supernova remnants MCSNR J0506-7025 and MCSNR J0527-7104 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Methods. We used data from XMM-Newton, the Australian Telescope Compact Array, and the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey to study their broadband emission and used Spitzer and HI data to gain a picture of their environments. We performed a multi-wavelength morphological study and detailed radio and X-ray spectral analyses to determine their physical characteristics. Results. Both remnants were found to have bright X-ray cores, dominated by Fe L-shell emission, consistent with reverse shock heated ejecta with determined Fe masses in agreement with Type Ia explosion yields. A soft X-ray shell, consistent with swept-up interstellar medium, was observed in MCSNR J0506-7025, suggestive of a remnant in the Sedov phase. Using the spectral fit results and the Sedov self-similar solution, we estimated the age of MCSNR J0506-7025 to be ~16-28 kyr, with an initial explosion energy of (0.07-0.84)x10^51 erg. A soft shell was absent in MCSNR J0527-7104, with only ejecta emission visible in an extremely elongated morphology extending beyond the optical shell. We suggest that the blast wave has broken out into a low density cavity, allowing the shock heated ejecta to escape. We found that the radio spectral index of MCSNR J0506-7025 is consistent with the standard ~0.5 for SNRs. Radio polarisation at 6 cm indicates a higher degree of polarisation along the western front and at the eastern knot, with a mean fractional polarisation across the remnant of P~(20 \pm 6)%. Conclusions. The detection of Fe-rich ejecta in the remnants suggests that both resulted from Type Ia explosions. The newly identified Fe-rich cores in MCSNR J0506-7025 and MCSNR J0527-7104 makes them members of the expanding class of evolved Fe-rich remnants in the Magellanic Clouds.
  • Aims: IKT 16 is an X-ray and radio-faint supernova remnant (SNR) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). A detailed X-ray study of this SNR with XMM-Newton confirmed the presence of a hard X-ray source near its centre, indicating the detection of the first composite SNR in the SMC. With a dedicated Chandra observation we aim to resolve the point source and confirm its nature. We also acquire new ATCA observations of the source at 2.1 GHz with improved flux density estimates and resolution. Methods: We perform detailed spatial and spectral analysis of the source. With the highest resolution X-ray and radio image of the centre of the SNR available today, we resolve the source and confirm its pulsar wind nebula (PWN) nature. Further, we constrain the geometrical parameters of the PWN and perform spectral analysis for the point source and the PWN separately. We also test for the radial variations of the PWN spectrum and its possible east west asymmetry. Results: The X-ray source at the centre of IKT 16 can be resolved into a symmetrical elongated feature centering a point source, the putative pulsar. Spatial modeling indicates an extent of 5.2 arcsec of the feature with its axis inclined at 82 degree east from north, aligned with a larger radio feature consisting of two lobes almost symmetrical about the X-ray source. The picture is consistent with a PWN which has not yet collided with the reverse shock. The point source is about three times brighter than the PWN and has a hard spectrum of spectral index 1.1 compared to a value 2.2 for the PWN. This points to the presence of a pulsar dominated by non-thermal emission. The expected E_{dot} is ~ 10^37 erg s^-1 and spin period < 100 ms. However, the presence of a compact nebula unresolved by Chandra at the distance of the SMC cannot completely be ruled out.
  • We have obtained a deep 8-field XMM-Newton mosaic of M33 covering the galaxy out to the D$_{25}$ isophote and beyond to a limiting 0.2--4.5 keV unabsorbed flux of 5$\times$10$^{-16}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (L${>}$4$\times$10$^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ at the distance of M33). These data allow complete coverage of the galaxy with high sensitivity to soft sources such as diffuse hot gas and supernova remnants. Here we describe the methods we used to identify and characterize 1296 point sources in the 8 fields. We compare our resulting source catalog to the literature, note variable sources, construct hardness ratios, classify soft sources, analyze the source density profile, and measure the X-ray luminosity function. As a result of the large effective area of XMM-Newton below 1 keV, the survey contains many new soft X-ray sources. The radial source density profile and X-ray luminosity function for the sources suggests that only $\sim$15% of the 391 bright sources with L${>}$3.6$\times$10$^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ are likely to be associated with M33, and more than a third of these are known supernova remnants. The log(N)--log(S) distribution, when corrected for background contamination, is a relatively flat power-law with a differential index of 1.5, which suggests many of the other M33 sources may be high-mass X-ray binaries. Finally, we note the discovery of an interesting new transient X-ray source, which we are unable to classify.
  • We present new optical spectroscopy of 20 candidate counterparts of 17 X-ray sources in the direction of the M31 disc. By comparing the X-ray catalogue from the XMM-Newton survey of M31 with star catalogues from the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we chose counterpart candidates based on optical colour and X-ray hardness. We have discovered 17 counterpart candidates with spectra containing stellar features. Eight of these are early-type stars of O or B type in M31, with hard X-ray spectra, making them good HMXB candidates. Three of these eight exhibit emission lines, which we consider to be the strongest HMXB candidates. In addition, our spectra reveal two likely Galactic cataclysmic variables, one foreground M star, two probable LMXBs related to M31 globular clusters, one emission line region with an embedded Wolf-Rayet star, and one newly-discovered supernova remnant. Finally, two of the sources have stellar spectra with no features indicative of association with an X-ray source.
  • We observed RX J0520.5-6932 in the X-rays and studied the optical light curve of its counterpart to verify it as a Be/X-ray binary. We performed an XMM-Newton anticipated target of opportunity observation in January 2013 during an X-ray outburst of the source in order to search for pulsations and derive its spectral properties. We monitored the source with Swift to follow the evolution of the outburst and to look for further outbursts to verify the regular pattern seen in the optical light curve with a period of ~24.4 d. The XMM-Newton EPIC light curves show coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of 8.035331(15) s (1 sigma). The X-ray spectrum can be modelled by an absorbed power law with photon index of ~0.8, an additional black-body component with temperature of ~0.25 keV and an Fe K line. Phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy reveals that the spectrum varies with pulse phase. We confirm the identification of the optical counterpart within the error circle of XMM-Newton at an angular distance of ~0.8 arcsec, which is an O9Ve star with known Halpha emission. By analyzing the combined data from three OGLE phases we derived an optical period of 24.43 d.The X-ray pulsations and long-term variability, as well as the properties of the optical counterpart, confirm that RX J0520.5-6932 is a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Based on the X-ray monitoring of the source we conclude that the event in January 2013 was a moderately bright type-I X-ray outburst, with a peak luminosity of 1.79e36 erg/s.
  • This White Paper, submitted to the recent ESA call for science themes to define its future large missions, advocates the need for a transformational leap in our understanding of two key questions in astrophysics: 1) How does ordinary matter assemble into the large scale structures that we see today? 2) How do black holes grow and shape the Universe? Hot gas in clusters, groups and the intergalactic medium dominates the baryonic content of the local Universe. To understand the astrophysical processes responsible for the formation and assembly of these large structures, it is necessary to measure their physical properties and evolution. This requires spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy with a factor 10 increase in both telescope throughput and spatial resolving power compared to currently planned facilities. Feedback from supermassive black holes is an essential ingredient in this process and in most galaxy evolution models, but it is not well understood. X-ray observations can uniquely reveal the mechanisms launching winds close to black holes and determine the coupling of the energy and matter flows on larger scales. Due to the effects of feedback, a complete understanding of galaxy evolution requires knowledge of the obscured growth of supermassive black holes through cosmic time, out to the redshifts where the first galaxies form. X-ray emission is the most reliable way to reveal accreting black holes, but deep survey speed must improve by a factor ~100 over current facilities to perform a full census into the early Universe. The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena+) mission provides the necessary performance (e.g. angular resolution, spectral resolution, survey grasp) to address these questions and revolutionize our understanding of the Hot and Energetic Universe. These capabilities will also provide a powerful observatory to be used in all areas of astrophysics.
  • White dwarfs, neutron stars and stellar mass black holes are key laboratories to study matter in most extreme conditions of gravity and magnetic field. The unprecedented effective area of Athena+ will allow us to advance our understanding of emission mechanisms and accretion physics over a wide range of mass accretion rates, starting from lower and sub-luminous quiescent X-ray binaries up to super-Eddington ultra-luminous sources. Athena+ will measure stellar black hole spins in a much higher number of binaries than achievable now, opening the possibility to study how spin varies with black hole history. The high throughput and energy resolution of the X-IFU will be instrumental in establishing how disc wind properties depend on accretion state, in determining wind launching mechanism and in quantifying the impact of the wind induced mass loss on binary evolution and environment. Triggers and high quality optical and radio data originating from large wide field contemporaneous instruments will provide essential complementary information on jet launching mechanisms and on the physics of rotation powered pulsars, for instance. In addition, Athena+ will furnish multiple, independent measurements of the neutron star mass/radius relation in a wide range of environments and conditions so as to constrain the debated equation of state.
  • A subset of ultraluminous X-ray sources (those with luminosities < 10^40 erg/s) are thought to be powered by the accretion of gas onto black holes with masses of ~5-20 M_solar, probably via an accretion disc. The X-ray and radio emission are coupled in such Galactic sources, with the radio emission originating in a relativistic jet thought to be launched from the innermost regions near the black hole, with the most powerful emission occurring when the rate of infalling matter approaches a theoretical maximum (the Eddington limit). Only four such maximal sources are known in the Milky Way, and the absorption of soft X-rays in the interstellar medium precludes determining the causal sequence of events that leads to the ejection of the jet. Here we report radio and X-ray observations of a bright new X-ray source whose peak luminosity can exceed 10^39 erg/s in the nearby galaxy, M31. The radio luminosity is extremely high and shows variability on a timescale of tens of minutes, arguing that the source is highly compact and powered by accretion close to the Eddington limit onto a stellar mass black hole. Continued radio and X-ray monitoring of such sources should reveal the causal relationship between the accretion flow and the powerful jet emission.
  • The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) hosts a rich and varied population of supernova remnants (SNRs). Optical, X-ray, and radio observations are required to identify these SNRs, as well as to ascertain the various processes responsible for the large array of physical characteristics observed. In this paper we attempted to confirm the candidate SNR [HP99] 1234, identified in X-rays with ROSAT, as a true SNR by supplementing these X-ray data with optical and radio observations. Optical data from the Magellanic Cloud Emission Line Survey (MCELS) and new radio data from the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST), in addition to the ROSAT X-ray data, were used to perform a morphological analysis of this candidate SNR. An approximately ellipsoidal shell of enhanced [SII], typical of an SNR ([SII]/Halpha > 0.4), was detected in the optical. This enhancement is coincident with faint radio emission at 36 cm. Using the available data we estimated the size of the remnant to be ~5.1' x 4.0' (~75 pc x 59 pc). However, the measurement along the major-axis was somewhat uncertain due to a lack of optical and radio emission at its extremities and the poor resolution of the X-ray data. Assuming this SNR is in the Sedov phase and adopting the ambient mass density of 1.2x10^-25 g cm^-3 measured in a nearby HII region, an age estimate of ~25 kyr was calculated for a canonical initial explosion energy of 10^51 erg. However, this age estimate should be treated cautiously due to uncertainties on the adopted parameters. Analysis of the local stellar population suggested a type Ia event as a precursor to this SNR, however, a core-collapse mechanism could not be ruled out due to the possibility of the progenitor being a runaway massive star. With the detection of X-ray, radio and optical line emission with enhanced [SII], this object was confirmed as an SNR and we assign the identifier MCSNR J0527-7104.
  • The Rapid Burster (MXB 1730-335) is a unique object, showing both type I and type II X-ray bursts. A type I burst of the Rapid Burster was observed with Swift/XRT on 2009 March 5, showing photospheric radius expansion for the first time in this source. We report here on the mass and radius determination from this photospheric radius expansion burst using a Bayesian approach. After marginalization over the likely distance of the system (5.8-10 kpc) we obtain M=1.1+/-0.3 M_sun and R=9.6+/-1.5 km (1-sigma uncertainties) for the compact object, ruling out the stiffest equations of state for the neutron star. We study the sensitivity of the results to the distance, the color correction factor, and the hydrogen mass fraction in the envelope. We find that only the distance plays a crucial role.
  • RX J0720.4-3125 is the most peculiar object among a group of seven isolated X-ray pulsars (the so-called "Magnificent Seven"), since it shows long-term variations of its spectral and temporal properties on time scales of years. This behaviour was explained by different authors either by free precession (with a seven or fourteen years period) or possibly a glitch that occurred around $\mathrm{MJD=52866\pm73 days}$. We analysed our most recent XMM-Newton and Chandra observations in order to further monitor the behaviour of this neutron star. With the new data sets, the timing behaviour of RX J0720.4-3125 suggests a single (sudden) event (e.g. a glitch) rather than a cyclic pattern as expected by free precession. The spectral parameters changed significantly around the proposed glitch time, but more gradual variations occurred already before the (putative) event. Since $\mathrm{MJD\approx53000 days}$ the spectra indicate a very slow cooling by $\sim$2 eV over 7 years.
  • We co-added the available XMM-Newton RGS spectra for each of the isolated X-ray pulsars RX\,J0720.4$-$3125, RX\,J1308.6+2127 (RBS\,1223), RX\,J1605.3+3249 and RX\,J1856.4$-$3754 (four members of the "Magnificent Seven") and the "Three Musketeers" Geminga, PSR\,B0656+14 and PSR\,B1055-52. We confirm the detection of a narrow absorption feature at 0.57 keV in the co-added RGS spectra of RX\,J0720.4$-$3125 and RX\,J1605.3+3249 (including most recent observations). In addition we found similar absorption features in the spectra of RX\,J1308.6+2127 (at 0.53 keV) and maybe PSR\,B1055-52 (at 0.56 keV). The absorption feature in the spectra of RX\,J1308.6+2127 is broader than the feature e.g. in RX\,J0720.4$-$3125. The narrow absorption features are detected with 2$\sigma$ to 5.6$\sigma$ significance. Although very bright and frequently observed, there are no absorption features visible in the spectra of RX\,J1856.4$-$3754 and PSR\,B0656+14, while the co-added XMM-Newton RGS spectrum of Geminga has not enough counts to detect such a feature. We discuss a possible origin of these absorption features as lines caused by the presence of highly ionised oxygen (in particular OVII and/or OVI at 0.57 keV) in the interstellar medium and absorption in the neutron star atmosphere, namely the absorption features at 0.57 keV as gravitational redshifted ($g_{r}$=1.17) OVIII.
  • We report on follow-up observations of candidate X-ray bright, radio-quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) identified from correlations of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 4 in Ag\"ueros et al. (2006). We obtained Chandra X-ray Telescope exposures for 13 candidates in order to pinpoint the source of X-ray emission in optically blank RASS error circles. These observations eliminated 12 targets as good INS candidates. We discuss subsequent observations of the remaining candidate with the XMM-Newton X-ray Observatory, the Gemini North Observatory, and the Apache Point Observatory. We identify this object as a likely extragalactic source with an unusually high log(fX/fopt) ~ 2.4. We also use an updated version of the population synthesis models of Popov et al. (2010) to estimate the number of RASS-detected INSs in the SDSS Data Release 7 footprint. We find that these models predict ~3-4 INSs in the 11,000 square deg imaged by SDSS, which is consistent with the number of known INSs that fall within the survey footprint. In addition, our analysis of the four new INS candidates identified by Turner et al. (2010) in the SDSS footprint implies that they are unlikely to be confirmed as INSs; together, these results suggest that new INSs are not likely to be found from further correlations of the RASS and SDSS.
  • Aims: We study the diffuse X-ray emission observed in the field of view of the pulsar B 0540-69 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by XMM-Newton. We want to understand the nature of this soft diffuse emission, which coincides with the superbubble in the HII region N 158, and improve our understanding of the evolution of superbubbles. Methods: We analyse the XMM-Newton spectra of the diffuse emission. Using the parameters obtained from the spectral fit, we perform calculations of the evolution of the superbubble. The mass loss and energy input rates are based on the initial mass function (IMF) of the observed OB association inside the superbubble. Results: The analysis of the spectra shows that the soft X-ray emission arises from hot shocked gas surrounded by a thin shell of cooler, ionised gas. We show that the stellar winds alone cannot account for the energy inside the superbubble, but the energy release of 2 - 3 supernova explosions in the past ~1 Myr provides a possible explanation. Conclusions: The combination of high sensitivity X-ray data, allowing spectral analysis, and analytical models for superbubbles bears the potential to reveal the evolutionary state of interstellar bubbles, if the stellar content is known.