• We present 5 years of optical and infrared data of the black hole candidate MAXI J1659-152 covering its 2010 outburst, decay and quiescence. Combining optical data taken during the outburst decay, we obtain an orbital period of 2.414 $\pm$ 0.005 h, in perfect agreement with the value previously measured from X-ray dips. In addition, we detect a clear H$\alpha$ excess in MAXI J1659-152 with data taken during the outburst decay. We also detect a single hump modulation most likely produced by irradiation. Assuming that the maximum occurs at orbital phase 0.5, we constrain the phase of the X-ray dips to be ~ 0.65. We also detect the quiescent optical counterpart at r' = 24.20 $\pm$ 0.08, I = 23.32 $\pm$ 0.02 and H = 20.7 $\pm$ 0.1. These magnitudes provide colour indices implying an M2-M5 donor star assuming 60% contribution from a disc component in the r'-band.
  • The large majority of the accreting supermassive black holes in the Universe are obscured by large columns of gas and dust. The location and evolution of this obscuring material have been the subject of intense research in the past decades, and are still highly debated. A decrease in the covering factor of the circumnuclear material with increasing accretion rates has been found by studies carried out across the electromagnetic spectrum. The origin of this trend has been suggested to be driven either by the increase in the inner radius of the obscuring material with incident luminosity due to the sublimation of dust; by the gravitational potential of the black hole; by radiative feedback; or by the interplay between outflows and inflows. However, the lack of a large, unbiased and complete sample of accreting black holes, with reliable information on gas column density, luminosity and mass, has left the main physical mechanism regulating obscuration unclear. Using a systematic multi-wavelength survey of hard X-ray-selected black holes, here we show that radiation pressure on dusty gas is indeed the main physical mechanism regulating the distribution of the circumnuclear material. Our results imply that the bulk of the obscuring dust and gas in these objects is located within the sphere of influence of the black hole (i.e., a few to tens of parsecs), and that it can be swept away even at low radiative output rates. The main physical driver of the differences between obscured and unobscured accreting black holes is therefore their mass-normalized accretion rate.
  • Hard X-ray ($\geq 10$ keV) observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) can shed light on some of the most obscured episodes of accretion onto supermassive black holes. The 70-month Swift/BAT all-sky survey, which probes the 14-195 keV energy range, has currently detected 838 AGN. We report here on the broad-band X-ray (0.3-150 keV) characteristics of these AGN, obtained by combining XMM-Newton, Swift/XRT, ASCA, Chandra, and Suzaku observations in the soft X-ray band ($\leq 10$ keV) with 70-month averaged Swift/BAT data. The non-blazar AGN of our sample are almost equally divided into unobscured ($N_{\rm H}< 10^{22}\rm cm^{-2}$) and obscured ($N_{\rm H}\geq 10^{22}\rm cm^{-2}$) AGN, and their Swift/BAT continuum is systematically steeper than the 0.3-10 keV emission, which suggests that the presence of a high-energy cutoff is almost ubiquitous. We discuss the main X-ray spectral parameters obtained, such as the photon index, the reflection parameter, the energy of the cutoff, neutral and ionized absorbers, and the soft excess for both obscured and unobscured AGN.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of the brightest Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) identified in the 7Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) survey over a time span of 16 years. Using a model of an intrinsically absorbed power-law plus reflection, with possible soft excess and narrow Fe K$\alpha$ line, we perform a systematic X-ray spectral analysis, both on the total 7Ms exposure and in four different periods with lengths of 2-21 months. With this approach, we not only present the power-law slopes, column densities $N_H$, observed fluxes, and absorption-corrected 2-10~keV luminosities $L_X$ for our sample of AGNs, but also identify significant spectral variabilities among them on time scales of years. We find that the $N_H$ variabilities can be ascribed to two different types of mechanisms, either flux-driven or flux-independent. We also find that the correlation between the narrow Fe line EW and $N_H$ can be well explained by the continuum suppression with increasing $N_H$. Accounting for the sample incompleteness and bias, we measure the intrinsic distribution of $N_H$ for the CDF-S AGN population and present re-selected subsamples which are complete with respect to $N_H$. The $N_H$-complete subsamples enable us to decouple the dependences of $N_H$ on $L_X$ and on redshift. Combining our data with that from C-COSMOS, we confirm the anti-correlation between the average $N_H$ and $L_X$ of AGN, and find a significant increase of the AGN obscured fraction with redshift at any luminosity. The obscured fraction can be described as $f_{obscured}\thickapprox 0.42\ (1+z)^{0.60}$.
  • We report on the detailed analysis of a gravitationally-lensed Y-band dropout, A2744_YD4, selected from deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging in the Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744. Band 7 observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) indicate the proximate detection of a significant 1mm continuum flux suggesting the presence of dust for a star-forming galaxy with a photometric redshift of $z\simeq8$. Deep X-SHOOTER spectra confirms the high redshift identity of A2744_YD4 via the detection of Lyman $\alpha$ emission at a redshift $z$=8.38. The association with the ALMA detection is confirmed by the presence of [OIII] 88$\mu$m emission at the same redshift. Although both emission features are only significant at the 4 $\sigma$ level, we argue their joint detection and the positional coincidence with a high redshift dropout in the HST images confirms the physical association. Analysis of the available photometric data and the modest gravitational magnification ($\mu\simeq2$) indicates A2744_YD4 has a stellar mass of $\sim$ 2$\times$10$^9$ M$_{\odot}$, a star formation rate of $\sim20$ M$_{\odot}$/yr and a dust mass of $\sim$6$\times$10$^{6}$ M$_{\odot}$. We discuss the implications of the formation of such a dust mass only $\simeq$200 Myr after the onset of cosmic reionisation.
  • IC883 is a luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) classified as a starburst-active galactic nucleus (AGN) composite. In a previous study we detected a low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) radio candidate. Here we report on our radio follow-up at three frequencies which provides direct and unequivocal evidence of the AGN activity in IC883. Our analysis of archival X-ray data, together with the detection of a transient radio source with luminosity typical of bright supernovae, give further evidence of the ongoing star formation activity, which dominates the energetics of the system. At sub-parsec scales, the radio nucleus has a core-jet morphology with the jet being a newly ejected component showing a subluminal proper motion of 0.6c-1c. The AGN contributes less than two per cent of the total IR luminosity of the system. The corresponding Eddington factor is ~1E-3, suggesting this is a low-accretion rate engine, as often found in LLAGNs. However, its high bolometric luminosity (~10E44erg/s) agrees better with a normal AGN. This apparent discrepancy may just be an indication of the transition nature of the nucleus from a system dominated by star-formation, to an AGN-dominated system. The nucleus has a strongly inverted spectrum and a turnover at ~4.4GHz, thus qualifying as a candidate for the least luminous (L_5.0GHz ~ 6.3E28erg/s/Hz) and one of the youngest (~3000yr) gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) sources. If the GPS origin for the IC883 nucleus is confirmed, then advanced mergers in the LIRG category are potentially key environments to unveil the evolution of GPS sources into more powerful radio galaxies.
  • An important constraint for galaxy evolution models is how much gas resides in galaxies, in particular at the peak of star formation z=1-3. We attempt a novel approach by letting long-duration Gamma Ray Bursts (LGRBs) x-ray their host galaxies and deliver column densities to us. This requires a good understanding of the obscurer and biases introduced by incomplete follow-up observations. We analyse the X-ray afterglow of all 844 Swift LGRBs to date for their column density $N_H$. To derive the population properties we propagate all uncertainties in a consistent Bayesian methodology. The $N_H$ distribution covers the $10^{20-23}\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$ range and shows no evolutionary effect. Higher obscurations, e.g. Compton-thick columns, could have been detected but are not observed. The $N_H$ distribution is consistent with sources randomly populating a ellipsoidal gas cloud of major axis $N_H^\text{major}=10^{23}\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$ with 0.22 dex intrinsic scatter between objects. The unbiased SHOALS survey of afterglows and hosts allows us to constrain the relation between Spitzer-derived stellar masses and X-ray derived column densities $N_H$. We find a well-constrained powerlaw relation of $N_H=10^{21.7}\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\times\left(M_{\star}/10^{9.5}M_{\odot}\right)^{1/3}$, with 0.5 dex intrinsic scatter between objects. The Milky Way and the Magellanic clouds also follow this relation. From the geometry of the obscurer, its stellar mass dependence and comparison with local galaxies we conclude that LGRBs are primarily obscured by galaxy-scale gas. Ray tracing of simulated Illustris galaxies reveals a relation of the same normalisation, but a steeper stellar-mass dependence and mild redshift evolution. Our new approach provides valuable insight into the gas residing in high-redshift galaxies.
  • The "torus" obscurer of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is poorly understood in terms of its density, substructure and physical mechanisms. Large X-ray surveys provide model boundary constraints, for both Compton-thin and Compton-thick levels of obscuration, as obscured fractions are mean covering factors $f_{\text{cov}}$. However, a major remaining uncertainty is host galaxy obscuration. In Paper I we discovered a relation of $N_H \propto M_{\star}^{1/3}$ for the obscuration of galaxy-scale gas. Here we apply this observational relation to the AGN population, and find that galaxy-scale gas is responsible for a luminosity-independent fraction of Compton-thin AGN, but does not produce Compton-thick columns. With the host galaxy obscuration understood, we present a model of the remaining, nuclear obscurer which is consistent with a range of observations. Our radiation-lifted torus model consists of a Compton-thick component ($f_{\text{cov}}\sim35\%$) and a Compton-thin component ($f_{\text{cov}}\sim40\%$), which depends on both black hole mass and luminosity. This provides a useful summary of observational constraints for torus modellers who attempt to reproduce this behaviour. It can also be employed as a sub-grid recipe in cosmological simulations which do not resolve the torus. We also investigate host-galaxy X-ray obscuration inside cosmological, hydro-dynamic simulations (EAGLE, Illustris). The obscuration from ray-traced galaxy gas can agree with observations, but is highly sensitive to the chosen feedback assumptions.
  • $Context:$ Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (IMBHs) are thought to be the seeds of early Supermassive Black Holes (SMBHs). While $\gtrsim$100 IMBH and small SMBH candidates have been identified in recent years, few have been robustly confirmed to date, leaving their number density in considerable doubt. Placing firmer constraints both on the methods used to identify and confirm IMBHs/SMBHs, as well as characterizing the range of host environments that IMBHs/SMBHs likely inhabit is therefore of considerable interest and importance. Additionally, finding significant numbers of IMBHs in metal-poor systems would be particularly intriguing, since such systems may represent local analogs of primordial galaxies, and therefore could provide clues of early accretion processes. $Aims:$ Here we study in detail several candidate Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) found in metal-poor hosts. $Methods:$ We utilize new X-ray and optical observations to characterize these metal-poor AGN candidates and compare them against known AGN luminosity relations and well-characterized IMBH/SMBH samples. $Results:$ Despite having clear broad optical emission lines that are long-lived ($\gtrsim$10--13\,yr), these candidate AGN appear to lack associated strong X-ray and hard UV emission, lying at least 1--2 dex off the known AGN correlations. If they are IMBHs/SMBHs, our constraints imply that they either are not actively accreting, their accretion disks are fully obscured along our line-of-sight, or their accretion disks are not producing characteristic high energy emission. Alternatively, if they are not AGN, then their luminous broad emission lines imply production by extreme stellar processes. The latter would have profound implications on the applicability of broad lines for mass estimates of massive black holes.
  • We exploit the 7 Ms \textit{Chandra} observations in the \chandra\,Deep Field-South (\mbox{CDF-S}), the deepest X-ray survey to date, coupled with CANDELS/GOODS-S data, to measure the total X-ray emission arising from 2076 galaxies at $3.5\leq z < 6.5$. This aim is achieved by stacking the \textit{Chandra} data at the positions of optically selected galaxies, reaching effective exposure times of $\geq10^9\mathrm{s}$. We detect significant ($>3.7\sigma$) X-ray emission from massive galaxies at $z\approx4$. We also report the detection of massive galaxies at $z\approx5$ at a $99.7\%$ confidence level ($2.7\sigma$), the highest significance ever obtained for X-ray emission from galaxies at such high redshifts. No significant signal is detected from galaxies at even higher redshifts. The stacking results place constraints on the BHAD associated with the known high-redshift galaxy samples, as well as on the SFRD at high redshift, assuming a range of prescriptions for X-ray emission due to X- ray binaries. We find that the X-ray emission from our sample is likely dominated by processes related to star formation. Our results show that low-rate mass accretion onto SMBHs in individually X-ray-undetected galaxies is negligible, compared with the BHAD measured for samples of X-ray detected AGN, for cosmic SMBH mass assembly at high redshift. We also place, for the first time, constraints on the faint-end of the AGN X-ray luminosity function ($\mathrm{logL_X\sim42}$) at $z>4$, with evidence for fairly flat slopes. The implications of all of these findings are discussed in the context of the evolution of the AGN population at high redshift.
  • We study the geometry of the AGN obscurer in IRAS 09104+4109, an IR-luminous, radio-intermediate FR-I source at $z=0.442$, using infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, X-ray data from Nustar, Swift, Suzaku, and Chandra, and an optical spectrum from Palomar. The infrared data imply a total rest-frame 1-1000$\mu$m luminosity of $5.5\times10^{46}$erg s$^{-1}$ and require both an AGN torus and starburst model. The AGN torus has an anisotropy-corrected IR luminosity of $4.9\times10^{46}$erg s$^{-1}$, and a viewing angle and half opening angle both of approximately $36$ degrees from pole-on. The starburst has a star formation rate of $(110\pm34)$M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and an age of $<50$Myr. These results are consistent with two epochs of luminous activity in 09104: one approximately $150$Myr ago, and one ongoing. The X-ray data suggest a photon index of $\Gamma \simeq 1.8$ and a line-of-sight column of $N_{\rm H} \simeq 5\times10^{23}$cm$^{-2}$. This argues against a reflection-dominated hard X-ray spectrum, which would have implied a much higher $N_{\rm H}$ and luminosity. The X-ray and infrared data are consistent with a bolometric AGN luminosity of $L_{\rm bol}\sim(0.5-2.5)\times10^{47}$erg s$^{-1}$. The X-ray and infrared data are further consistent with coaligned AGN obscurers in which the line of sight "skims" the torus. This is also consistent with the optical spectra, which show both coronal iron lines and broad lines in polarized but not direct light. Combining constraints from the X-ray, optical, and infrared data suggests that the AGN obscurer is within a vertical height of $20$pc, and a radius of $125$pc, of the nucleus.
  • We exploit the widely-separated images of the lensed quasar SDSS J1029+2623 ($z_{em}$=2.197, $\theta =22^{\prime\prime}\!\!.5$) to observe its outflowing wind through two different sightlines. We present an analysis of three observations, including two with the Subaru telescope in 2010 February (Misawa et al. 2013) and 2014 April (Misawa et al. 2014), separated by 4 years, and one with the Very Large Telescope, separated from the second Subaru observation by $\sim$2 months. We detect 66 narrow absorption lines (NALs), of which 24 are classified as intrinsic NALs that are physically associated with the quasar based on partial coverage analysis. The velocities of intrinsic NALs appear to cluster around values of $v_{ej}$ $\sim$ 59,000, 43,000, and 29,000 km/s, which is reminiscent of filamentary structures obtained by numerical simulations. There are no common intrinsic NALs at the same redshift along the two sightlines, implying that the transverse size of the NAL absorbers should be smaller than the sightline distance between two lensed images. In addition to the NALs with large ejection velocities of $v_{ej}$ > 1,000 km/s, we also detect broader proximity absorption lines (PALs) at $z_{abs}$ $\sim$ $z_{em}$. The PALs are likely to arise in outflowing gas at a distance of r $\leq$ 620 pc from the central black hole with an electron density of $n_e$ $\geq$ 8.7$\times$10$^{3}$ cm$^{-3}$. These limits are based on the assumption that the variability of the lines is due to recombination. We discuss the implications of these results on the three-dimensional structure of the outflow.
  • We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of 115 deg^2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its 'warm' mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z > 3 to test various models for "feedback" from active galactic nuclei (AGN). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z > 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5{\sigma} depths of 6.13 {\mu}Jy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 {\mu}Jy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, respectively - depths significantly fainter than WISE. We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically-confirmed quasars (98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z > 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 {\mu}m-only detection catalog containing 6.1 million sources, a 4.5 {\mu}m-only detection catalog containing 6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing 5.4 million sources.
  • During the last ~50 years, the population of black hole candidates in X-ray binaries has increased considerably with 59 Galactic objects detected in transient low-mass X-ray binaries, plus a few in persistent systems (including ~5 extragalactic binaries). We collect near-infrared, optical and X-ray information spread over hundreds of references in order to study the population of black holes in X-ray transients as a whole. We present the most updated catalogue of black hole transients, which contains X-ray, optical and near-infrared observations together with their astrometric and dynamical properties. It provides new useful information in both statistical and observational parameters providing a thorough and complete overview of the black hole population in the Milky Way. Analysing the distances and spatial distribution of the observed systems, we estimate a total population of ~1300 Galactic black hole transients. This means that we have already discovered less than ~5% of the total Galactic distribution. The complete version of this catalogue will be continuously updated online and in the Virtual Observatory, including finding charts and data in other wavelengths.
  • We searched for z > 7 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) in the optical-to-mid-infrared Hubble Frontier Field and associated parallel field observations of the strong-lensing cluster MACS J0416-2403. We discovered 22 candidates, of which six lie at z > 9 and one lies at z > 10. Based on the Hubble and Spitzer photometry, all have secure photometric redshifts and a negligible probability of being at lower redshifts, according to their peak probability ratios, R. This substantial increase in the number of known high-redshift galaxies allows a solid determination of the luminosity function at z > 8. The number of high-z candidates in the parallel field is considerably higher than that in the Abell 2744 parallel field. Our candidates have median stellar masses of log(M_*) ~ 8.40^{+0.55}_{-0.31}~Msun, SFRs of ~ 1.6^{+0.5}_{-0.4} Msun yr^-1, and SFR-weighted ages of < 310^{+70}_{-140} Myr. Finally, we are able to put strong constraints on the z = 7,8,9 and 10 luminosity functions. One of the objects in the cluster field is a z ~ 10 candidate, with a magnification of mu ~ 20 +- 13. This object is likely the faintest z ~ 10 object known to date, allowing a first look into the extreme faint-end (L ~ 0.04L*) of the z ~ 10 luminosity function.
  • We present a NuSTAR, Chandra, and XMM--Newton survey of nine of the nearest ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The unprecedented sensitivity of NuSTAR at energies above 10 keV enables spectral modeling with far better precision than was previously possible. Six of the nine sources observed were detected sufficiently well by NuSTAR to model in detail their broadband X-ray spectra, and recover the levels of obscuration and intrinsic X-ray luminosities. Only one source (IRAS 13120--5453) has a spectrum consistent with a Compton--thick AGN, but we cannot rule out that a second source (Arp 220) harbors an extremely highly obscured AGN as well. Variability in column density (reduction by a factor of a few compared to older observations) is seen in IRAS 05189--2524 and Mrk 273, altering the classification of these border-line sources from Compton-thick to Compton-thin. The ULIRGs in our sample have surprisingly low observed fluxes in high energy (>10 keV) X-rays, especially compared to their bolometric luminosities. They have lower ratios of unabsorbed 2--10 keV to bolometric luminosity, and unabsorbed 2--10 keV to mid-IR [O IV] line luminosity than do Seyfert 1 galaxies. We identify IRAS 08572+3915 as another candidate intrinsically X-ray weak source, similar to Mrk 231. We speculate that the X-ray weakness of IRAS 08572+3915 is related to its powerful outflow observed at other wavelengths.
  • Galactic Center (GC) molecular cloud Sgr B2 is the best manifestation of an X-ray reflection nebula (XRN) reprocessing a past giant outburst from the supermassive black hole Sgr A*. Alternatively, Sgr B2 could be illuminated by low-energy cosmic ray electrons (LECRe) or protons (LECRp). In 2013, NuSTAR for the first time resolved Sgr B2 hard X-ray emission on sub-arcminute scales. Two prominent features are detected above 10 keV - a newly emerging cloud G0.66-0.13 and the central 90" radius region containing two compact cores Sgr B2(M) and Sgr B2(N) surrounded by diffuse emission. It is inconclusive whether the remaining level of Sgr B2 emission is still decreasing or has reached a constant background level. A decreasing Fe K$\alpha$ emission can be best explained by XRN while a constant background emission can be best explained by LECRp. In the XRN scenario, the 3-79 keV Sgr B2 spectrum can well constrain the past Sgr A* outburst, resulting in an outburst spectrum with a peak luminosity of $L_{3-79\rm~keV} \sim 5\times10^{38} \rm~erg~s^{-1}$ derived from the maximum Compton-scattered continuum and the Fe K$\alpha$ emission consistently. The XRN scenario is preferred by the fast variability of G0.66-0.13, which could be a molecular clump located in the Sgr B2 envelope reflecting the same Sgr A* outburst. In the LECRp scenario, we derived the required CR ion power $dW/dt=(1-4)\times10^{39}\rm~erg~s^{-1}$ and the CR ionization rate $\zeta_{H}=(6-10)\times 10^{-15}\rm~H^{-1}~s^{-1}$. The Sgr B2 background level X-ray emission will be a powerful tool to constrain GC CR population.
  • We present the characterization and initial results from the QUEST-La Silla AGN variability survey. This is an effort to obtain well sampled optical light curves in extragalactic fields with unique multi-wavelength observations. We present photometry obtained from 2010 to 2012 in the XMM-COSMOS field, which was observed over 150 nights using the QUEST camera on the ESO-Schmidt telescope. The survey uses a broadband filter, the $Q$-band, similar to the union of the $g$ and the $r$ filters, achieving an intrinsic photometric dispersion of $0.05$ mag, and a systematic error of $0.05$ mag in the zero-point. Since some detectors of the camera show significant non-linearity, we use a linear correlation to fit the zero-points as a function of the instrumental magnitudes, thus obtaining a good correction to the non-linear behavior of these detectors. We obtain good photometry to an equivalent limiting magnitude of $r\sim 20.5$. Studying the optical variability of X-ray detected sources in the XMM-COSMOS field, we find that the survey is $\sim75-80$% complete to magnitudes $r\sim20$, and $\sim67$% complete to a magnitude $r\sim21$. The determination and parameterization of the structure function (${SF}_{norm}(\tau) = A \tau^{\gamma}$) of the variable sources shows that most BL AGN are characterized by $A > 0.1$ and $\gamma > 0.025$. It is further shown that variable NL AGN and GAL sources occupying the same parameter space in $A$ and $\gamma$ are very likely to correspond to obscured or low luminosity AGN. Our samples are, however, small, and we expect to revisit these results using larger samples with longer light curves obtained as part of our ongoing survey.
  • We report on observations of NGC1068 with NuSTAR, which provide the best constraints to date on its $>10$~keV spectral shape. We find no strong variability over the past two decades, consistent with its Compton-thick AGN classification. The combined NuSTAR, Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift-BAT spectral dataset offers new insights into the complex reflected emission. The critical combination of the high signal-to-noise NuSTAR data and a spatial decomposition with Chandra allow us to break several model degeneracies and greatly aid physical interpretation. When modeled as a monolithic (i.e., a single N_H) reflector, none of the common Compton-reflection models are able to match the neutral fluorescence lines and broad spectral shape of the Compton reflection. A multi-component reflector with three distinct column densities (e.g., N_H~1.5e23, 5e24, and 1e25 cm^{-2}) provides a more reasonable fit to the spectral lines and Compton hump, with near-solar Fe abundances. In this model, the higher N_H components provide the bulk of the Compton hump flux while the lower N_H component produces much of the line emission, effectively decoupling two key features of Compton reflection. We note that ~30% of the neutral Fe Kalpha line flux arises from >2" (~140 pc), implying that a significant fraction of the <10 keV reflected component arises from regions well outside of a parsec-scale torus. These results likely have ramifications for the interpretation of poorer signal-to-noise observations and/or more distant objects [Abridged].
  • We present a catalog of 1415 X-ray sources identified in the Norma arm region Chandra survey (NARCS), which covers a 2 deg x 0.8 deg region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm to a depth of $\approx$20 ks. Of these sources, 1130 are point-like sources detected with $\geq3\sigma$ confidence in at least one of three energy bands (0.5-10, 0.5-2, and 2-10 keV), five have extended emission, and the remainder are detected at low significance. Since most sources have too few counts to permit individual classification, they are divided into five spectral groups defined by their quantile properties. We analyze stacked spectra of X-ray sources within each group, in conjunction with their fluxes, variability, and infrared counterparts, to identify the dominant populations in our survey. We find that $\sim$50% of our sources are foreground sources located within 1-2 kpc, which is consistent with expectations from previous surveys. Approximately 20% of sources are likely located in the proximity of the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arm, while 30% are more distant, in the proximity of the far Norma arm or beyond. We argue that a mixture of magnetic and nonmagnetic CVs dominates the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arms, while intermediate polars (IPs) and high-mass stars (isolated or in binaries) dominate the far Norma arm. We also present the cumulative number count distribution for sources in our survey that are detected in the hard energy band. A population of very hard sources in the vicinity of the far Norma arm and active galactic nuclei dominate the hard X-ray emission down to $f_X\approx10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, but the distribution curve flattens at fainter fluxes. We find good agreement between the observed distribution and predictions based on other surveys.
  • The deflection angles of lensed sources increase with their distance behind a given lens. We utilize this geometric effect to corroborate the $z_{phot}\simeq9.8$ photometric redshift estimate of a faint near-IR dropout, triply-imaged by the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 in deep Hubble Frontier Fields images. The multiple images of this source follow the same symmetry as other nearby sets of multiple images which bracket the critical curves and have well defined redshifts (up to $z_{spec}\simeq3.6$), but with larger deflection angles, indicating that this source must lie at a higher redshift. Similarly, our different parametric and non-parametric lens models all require this object be at $z\gtrsim4$, with at least 95\% confidence, thoroughly excluding the possibility of lower-redshift interlopers. To study the properties of this source we correct the two brighter images for their magnifications, leading to a SFR of $\sim0.3 M_{\odot}$/yr, a stellar mass of $\sim4\times10^{7} M_{\odot}$, and an age of $\lesssim220$ Myr (95\% confidence). The intrinsic apparent magnitude is 29.9 AB (F160W), and the rest-frame UV ($\sim1500 \AA$) absolute magnitude is $M_{UV,AB}=-17.6$. This corresponds to $\sim0.1 L^{*}_{z=8}$ ($\sim0.2 L^{*}_{z=10}$, adopting $dM^{*}/dz\sim0.45$), making this candidate one of the least luminous galaxies discovered at $z\sim10$.
  • We present a broadband (~0.5-79 keV) spectral and temporal analysis of multiple NuSTAR observations combined with archival Suzaku and Chandra data of NGC4945, the brightest extragalactic source at 100 keV. We observe hard X-ray (> 10 keV) flux and spectral variability, with flux variations of a factor 2 on timescales of 20 ksec. A variable primary continuum dominates the high energy spectrum (>10 keV) in all the states, while the reflected/scattered flux which dominates at E< 10 keV stays approximately constant. From modelling the complex reflection/transmission spectrum we derive a Compton depth along the line of sight of tau_Thomson ~ 2.9, and a global covering factor for the circumnuclear gas of ~ 0.15. This agrees with the constraints derived from the high energy variability, which implies that most of the high energy flux is transmitted, rather that Compton-scattered. This demonstrates the effectiveness of spectral analysis in constraining the geometric properties of the circumnuclear gas, and validates similar methods used for analyzing the spectra of other bright, Compton-thick AGN. The lower limits on the e-folding energy are between 200-300 keV, consistent with previous BeppoSAX, Suzaku and Swift BAT observations. The accretion rate, estimated from the X-ray luminosity and assuming a bolometric correction typical of type 2 AGN, is in the range ~0.1-0.3 lambda_Edd depending on the flux state. The substantial observed X-ray luminosity variability of NGC4945 implies that large errors can arise from using single-epoch X-ray data to derive L/L_Edd values for obscured AGNs.
  • We report on CTIO/NEWFIRM and CTIO/OSIRIS photometric and spectroscopic observations of 20 new X-ray (0.5-10 keV) emitters discovered in the Norma Arm Region Chandra Survey (NARCS). NEWFIRM photometry was obtained to pinpoint the near-infrared counterparts of NARCS sources, while OSIRIS spectroscopy was used to help identify 20 sources with possible high mass X-ray binary properties. We find that (1) two sources are WN8 Wolf-Rayet stars, maybe in colliding wind binaries, part of the massive star cluster Mercer 81; (2) two are emission-line stars, possibly in X-ray binaries, that exhibit near- and mid-infrared excesses either due to free-free emission from the decretion discs of Be stars or warm dust in the stellar winds of peculiar massive stars such as B[e] supergiants or luminous blue variables; (3) one is a B8-A3 IV-V star that could be in a quiescent high mass X-ray binary system; (4) two are cataclysmic variables including one intermediate polar; (5) three may be neutron star symbiotic binaries; (6) five are most likely white dwarf symbiotic binaries; and (7) five exhibit properties more consistent with isolated giant/dwarf stars. The possible detection of one to three high mass X-ray binaries is in good agreement with our predictions. However, our study illustrates the difficulty of clearly differentiating quiescent or intermediate X-ray luminosity systems from isolated massive stars, which may lead to an underestimation of the number of known high mass X-ray binaries.
  • We use Chandra data to study the incidence and properties of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in 16 intermediate redshift ($0.5 < z < 1.1$) X-ray-selected galaxy groups in the Chandra Deep Field-South. We measure an AGN fraction of $f(L_{X,H} > 10^{42}; M_R<-20) = 8.0_{-2.3}^{+3.0}\%$ at $\bar{z} \sim 0.74$, approximately a factor of two higher than the AGN fraction found for rich clusters at comparable redshift. This extends the trend found at low redshift for groups to have higher AGN fractions than clusters. Our estimate of the AGN fraction is also more than a factor of 3 higher than that of low redshift X-ray-selected groups. Using optical spectra from various surveys, we also constrain the properties of emission-line selected AGN in these groups. Contrary to the large population of X-ray AGN ($N(L_{X,H} > 10^{41}$ erg/s) = 25), we find only 4 emission-line AGN, 3 of which are also X-ray bright. Furthermore, most of the X-ray AGN in our groups are optically-dull (i.e. lack strong emission-lines) similar to those found in low redshift X-ray groups and clusters of galaxies. This contrasts with the AGN population found in low redshift optically-selected groups which are dominated by emission-line AGN. The differences between the optically and X-ray-selected AGN populations in groups are consistent with a scenario where most AGN in the densest environments are currently in a low accretion state.
  • During hard X-ray observations of the Norma spiral arm region by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) in 2013 February, a new transient source, NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, was detected at a significance level of 8-sigma in the 3-10 keV bandpass. The source is consistent with having a constant NuSTAR count rate over a period of 40 ks and is also detected simultaneously by Swift at lower significance. The source is not significantly detected by NuSTAR, Swift, or Chandra in the days before or weeks after the discovery of the transient, indicating that the strong X-ray activity lasted for between ~0.5 and 1.5 days. Near-IR imaging observations were carried out before and after the X-ray activity, but we are not able to identify the counterpart. The combined NuSTAR and Swift energy spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon index of Gamma = 4.1(+1.5)(-1.0) (90% confidence errors), a blackbody with kT = 1.2+/-0.3 keV, or a bremsstrahlung model with kT = 3.0(+2.1)(-1.2) keV. The reduced-chi2 values for the three models are not significantly different, ranging from 1.23 to 1.44 for 8 degrees of freedom. The spectrum is strongly absorbed with NH = 2.8(+2.3)(-1.4)e23 cm-2, 9(+15)(-7)e22 cm-2, and 1.7(+1.7)(-0.9)e23 cm-2, for the power-law, blackbody, and bremsstrahlung models, respectively. Although the high column density could be due to material local to the source, it is consistent with absorption from interstellar material along the line of sight at a distance of 11 kpc, which would indicate an X-ray luminosity >1e34 erg/s. Although we do not reach a definitive determination of the nature of NuSTAR J163433-4738.7, we suggest that it may be an unusually bright active binary or a magnetar.