• We evaluate the dynamical stability of a selection of outer solar system objects in the presence of the proposed new Solar System member Planet Nine. We use a Monte Carlo suite of numerical N-body integrations to construct a variety of orbital elements of the new planet and evaluate the dynamical stability of eight Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) in the presence of Planet Nine. These simulations show that some combinations of orbital elements ($a,e$) result in Planet Nine acting as a stabilizing influence on the TNOs, which can otherwise be destabilized by interactions with Neptune. These simulations also suggest that some TNOs transition between several different mean-motion resonances during their lifetimes while still retaining approximate apsidal anti-alignment with Planet Nine. This behavior suggests that remaining in one particular orbit is not a requirement for orbital stability. As one product of our simulations, we present an {\it a posteriori} probability distribution for the semi-major axis and eccentricity of the proposed Planet Nine based on TNO stability. This result thus provides additional evidence that supports the existence of this proposed planet. We also predict that TNOs can be grouped into multiple populations of objects that interact with Planet Nine in different ways: one population may contain objects like Sedna and 2012 VP$_{113}$, which do not migrate significantly in semi-major axis in the presence of Planet Nine and tend to stay in the same resonance; another population may contain objects like 2007 TG$_{422}$ and 2013 RF$_{98}$, which may both migrate and transition between different resonances.
  • Accretion onto Classical T Tauri stars is thought to take place through the action of magnetospheric processes, with gas in the inner disk being channeled onto the star's surface by the stellar magnetic field lines. Young stars are known to accrete material in a time-variable manner and the source of this variability remains an open problem, particularly on the shortest (~ day) timescales. Using one-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations that follow the field line geometry, we find that for plausibly realistic young stars, steady-state transonic accretion occurs naturally in the absence of any other source of variability. However, we show that if the density in the inner disk varies smoothly in time with ~ day long time-scales (e.g., due to turbulence) this complication can lead to the development of shocks in the accretion column. These shocks propagate along the accretion column and ultimately hit the star, leading to rapid, large amplitude changes in the accretion rate. We argue that when these shocks hit the star the observed time-dependence will be a rapid increase in accretion luminosity followed by a slower decline and could be an explanation for some of the short period variability observed in accreting young stars. Our one-dimensional approach bridges previous analytic work to more complicated, multi-dimensional simulations, and observations.
  • We report the observation and physical characterization of the possible dwarf planet \UZ\ ("DeeDee"), a dynamically detached trans-Neptunian object discovered at 92 AU. This object is currently the second-most distant known trans-Neptunian object with reported orbital elements, surpassed in distance only by the dwarf planet Eris. The object was discovered with an $r$-band magnitude of 23.0 in data collected by the Dark Energy Survey between 2014 and 2016. Its 1140-year orbit has $(a,e,i) = (109~\mathrm{AU}, 0.65, 26.8^{\circ})$. It will reach its perihelion distance of 38 AU in the year 2142. Integrations of its orbit show it to be dynamically stable on Gyr timescales, with only weak interactions with Neptune. We have performed followup observations with ALMA, using 3 hours of on-source integration time to measure the object's thermal emission in the Rayleigh-Jeans tail. The signal is detected at 7$\sigma$ significance, from which we determine a $V$-band albedo of $13.1^{+3.3}_{-2.4}\mathrm{(stat)}^{+2.0}_{-1.4}\mathrm{(sys)}$ percent and a diameter of $635^{+57}_{-61}\mathrm{(stat)}^{+32}_{-39}\mathrm{(sys)}$~km, assuming a spherical body with uniform surface properties.
  • Most star formation in our galaxy occurs within embedded clusters, and these background environments can affect the star and planet formation processes occurring within them. In turn, young stellar members can shape the background environment and thereby provide a feedback mechanism. This work explores one aspect of stellar feedback by quantifying the background X-ray radiation fields produced by young stellar objects. Specifically, the distributions of X-ray luminosities and X-ray fluxes produced by cluster environments are constructed as a function of cluster membership size $N$. Composite flux distributions, for given distributions of cluster sizes $N$, are also constructed. The resulting distributions are wide and the X-ray radiation fields are moderately intense, with the expected flux levels exceeding the cosmic and galactic X-ray backgrounds by factors of $\sim10-1000$ (for energies 0.2 -- 15 keV). For circumstellar disks that are geometrically thin and optically thick, the X-ray flux from the background cluster dominates that provided by a typical central star in the outer disk where $r \ga 9 - 14$ AU. In addition, the expectation value of the ionization rate provided by the cluster X-ray background is $\zeta_X\sim8\times10^{-17}$ s$^{-1}$, about 4 -- 8 times larger than the canonical value of the ionization rate from cosmic rays. These elevated flux levels in clusters indicate that X-rays can affect ionization, chemistry, and heating in circumstellar disks and in the material between young stellar objects.
  • The propagation of high-energy cosmic rays through giant molecular clouds constitutes a fundamental process in astronomy and astrophysics. The diffusion of cosmic-rays through these magnetically turbulent environments is often studied through the use of energy-dependent diffusion coefficients, although these are not always well motivated theoretically. Now, however, it is feasible to perform detailed numerical simulations of the diffusion process computationally. While the general problem depends upon both the field structure and particle energy, the analysis may be greatly simplified by dimensionless analysis. That is, for a specified purely turbulent field, the analysis depends almost exclusively on a single parameter -- the ratio of the maximum wavelength of the turbulent field cells to the particle gyration radius. For turbulent magnetic fluctuations superimposed over an underlying uniform magnetic field, particle diffusion depends on a second dimensionless parameter that characterizes the ratio of the turbulent to uniform magnetic field energy densities. We consider both of these possibilities and parametrize our results to provide simple quantitative expressions that suitably characterize the diffusion process within molecular cloud environments. Doing so, we find that the simple scaling laws often invoked by the high-energy astrophysics community to model cosmic-ray diffusion through such regions appear to be fairly robust for the case of a uniform magnetic field with a strong turbulent component, but are only valid up to $\sim 50$ TeV particle energies for a purely turbulent field. These results have important consequences for the analysis of cosmic-ray processes based on TeV emission spectra associated with dense molecular clouds.
  • Motivated by a class of orbit problems in astrophysics, this paper considers solutions to Hill's equation with forcing strength parameters that vary from cycle to cycle. The results are generalized to include period variations from cycle to cycle. The development of the solutions to the differential equation is governed by a discrete map. For the general case of Hill's equation in the unstable limit, we consider separately the case of purely positive matrix elements and those with mixed signs; we then find exact expressions, bounds, and working estimates for the growth rates. We also find exact expressions, estimates, and bounds for the infinite products of several $2 \times 2$ matrices with random variables in the matrix elements. In the limit of sharply spiked forcing terms (the delta function limit), we find analytic solutions for each cycle and for the discrete map that matches solutions from cycle to cycle; for this case we find the growth rates and the condition for instability in the limit of large forcing strength, as well as the widths of the stable/unstable zones.
  • This paper examines how type I planet migration is affected by the presence of turbulent density fluctuations in the circumstellar disk. For type I migration, the planet does not clear a gap in the disk and its secular motion is driven by torques generated by the wakes it creates in the surrounding disk fluid. MHD turbulence creates additional density perturbations that gravitationally interact with the planet and can dominate the torques produced by the migration mechanism itself. This paper shows that conventional type I migration can be readily overwhelmed by turbulent perturbations and hence the usual description of type I migration should be modified in locations where the magnetorotational instability is active. In general, the migrating planet does not follow a smooth inward trned, but rather exhibits a random walk through phase space. Our main conclusion is that MHD turbulence will alter the time scales for type I planet migration and -- because of chaos -- requires the time scales to be described by a distribution of values.
  • We discuss the physics of vortices in the circumstellar disks associated with young stellar objects. We elucidate the basic physical properties of these localized storm systems. In particular, we consider point vortices, linear vortices, the effects of self-gravity, magnetic fields, and nonlinear aspects of the problem. We find that these vortices can exist in many different forms in the disks of young stellar objects and may play a role in the formation of binary companions and/or giant planets. Vortices may enhance giant planet formation via gravitational instability by allowing dust grains (heavy elements) to settle to the center on a short timescale; the gravitational instability itself is also enhanced because the vortices also create a larger local surface density in the disk. In addition, vortices can enhance energy dissipation in disks and thereby affect disk accretion. Finally, we consider the possibility that vortices of this type exist in molecular clouds and in the disk of the galaxy itself. On all of these size scales, vortices can produce long-lived structures which may correspond to observed structures in these systems.
  • A pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, with a potential of the form $V(\phi) = \Lambda^4[1 \pm \cos(\phi/f)], naturally gives rise to inflation if $f \sim M_{Pl}$ and $\Lambda \sim M_{GUT}$. We show how this can arise in technicolor-like and superstring models, and work out an explicit string example in the context of multiple gaugino condensation models. We study the cosmology of this model in detail, and find that sufficient reheating to ensure that baryogenesis can take place requires $f > 0.3 M_{Pl}$. The primordial density fluctuation spectrum generated is a non-scale-invariant power law, $P(k) \propto k^{n_s}$, with $n_s \simeq 1 - (M^2_{Pl}/8\pi f^2)$, leading to more power on large length scales than the $n_s = 1$ Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum. The standard CDM model with $0 \la n_s \la 0.6-0.7$ could in principle explain the large-scale clustering observed in the APM and IRAS galaxy surveys as well as large-scale flows, but the COBE microwave anisotropy implies such low amplitudes (or high bias factors, $b>2$) for these CDM models that galaxy formation occurs too late to be viable; combining COBE with sufficiently early galaxy formation or the large-scale flows leads to $n_s >0.6$, or $f > 0.3 M_{Pl}$ as well. For extended and power law inflation models, this constraint is even tighter, $n_s > 0.7$; combined with other bounds on large bubbles in extended inflation, this leaves little room for most extended models.