• A major obstacle to understanding neural coding and computation is the fact that experimental recordings typically sample only a small fraction of the neurons in a circuit. Measured neural properties are skewed by interactions between recorded neurons and the "hidden" portion of the network. To properly interpret neural data and determine how biological structure gives rise to neural circuit function, we thus need a better understanding of the relationships between measured effective neural properties and the true underlying physiological properties. Here, we focus on how the effective spatiotemporal dynamics of the synaptic interactions between neurons are reshaped by coupling to unobserved neurons. We find that the effective interactions from a pre-synaptic neuron $r'$ to a post-synaptic neuron $r$ can be decomposed into a sum of the true interaction from $r'$ to $r$ plus corrections from every directed path from $r'$ to $r$ through unobserved neurons. Importantly, the resulting formula reveals when the hidden units have---or do not have---major effects on reshaping the interactions among observed neurons. As a particular example of interest, we derive a formula for the impact of hidden units in random networks with "strong" coupling---connection weights that scale with $1/\sqrt{N}$, where $N$ is the network size, precisely the scaling observed in recent experiments. With this quantitative relationship between measured and true interactions, we can study how network properties shape effective interactions, which properties are relevant for neural computations, and how to manipulate effective interactions.
  • Describing the collective activity of neural populations is a daunting task: the number of possible patterns grows exponentially with the number of cells, resulting in practically unlimited complexity. Recent empirical studies, however, suggest a vast simplification in how multi-neuron spiking occurs: the activity patterns of some circuits are nearly completely captured by pairwise interactions among neurons. Why are such pairwise models so successful in some instances, but insufficient in others? Here, we study the emergence of higher-order interactions in simple circuits with different architectures and inputs. We quantify the impact of higher-order interactions by comparing the responses of mechanistic circuit models vs. "null" descriptions in which all higher-than-pairwise correlations have been accounted for by lower order statistics, known as pairwise maximum entropy models. We find that bimodal input signals produce larger deviations from pairwise predictions than unimodal inputs for circuits with local and global connectivity. Moreover, recurrent coupling can accentuate these deviations, if coupling strengths are neither too weak nor too strong. A circuit model based on intracellular recordings from ON parasol retinal ganglion cells shows that a broad range of light signals induce unimodal inputs to spike generators, and that coupling strengths produce weak effects on higher-order interactions. This provides a novel explanation for the success of pairwise models in this system. Overall, our findings identify circuit-level mechanisms that produce and fail to produce higher-order spiking statistics in neural ensembles.