• We report the discovery of a repeating photometric signal from a low-mass member of the Praesepe open cluster that we interpret as a Neptune-sized transiting planet. The star is JS 183 (HSHJ 163, EPIC 211916756) with $T_{\rm eff} = 3325\pm100$ K, $M_{*} = 0.44\pm0.04$ $M_{\odot}$, $R_{*} = 0.44\pm0.03$ $R_{\odot}$, and $\log{g_*} = 4.82\pm0.06$. The planet has an orbital period of 10.134588 days and a radius of $R_{P}= 0.32\pm0.02$ $R_J$. Since the star is faint at $V=16.5$ and $J=13.3$, we are unable to obtain a measured radial-velocity orbit, but we can constrain the companion mass to below about 1.7 $M_J$, and thus well below the planetary boundary. JS 183b (since designated as K2-95b) is the second transiting planet found with ${\it K2}$ that resides in a several hundred Myr open cluster; both planets orbit mid-M dwarf stars and are approximately Neptune-sized. With a well-determined stellar density from the planetary transit, and with an independently known metallicity from its cluster membership, JS 183 provides a particularly valuable test of stellar models at the fully convective boundary. We find that JS 183 is the lowest-density transit host known at the fully convective boundary, and that its very low density is consistent with current models of stars just above the fully convective boundary but in tension with the models just below the fully convective boundary.
  • We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves, as well as broad-band multi-wavelength photometry and high resolution, multi- and single-epoch spectroscopy for 17 classical T Tauris in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves (LCs) exemplify the "stochastic" LC class as defined in Cody et al. (2014). The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability in this LC class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. As evidence in favor of this hypothesis, multi-epoch high resolution spectra for a subset of these stars shows that their veiling levels also vary in time and that this veiling variability is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical LC morphology. Furthermore, the veiling variability is well-correlated with the strength of the HeI 6678A emission line, a feature predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst LC morphology (Stauffer et al. 2014) are also attributed to variable mass accretion. Both the stochastic and accretion burst LCs can be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic LC class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Based on their UV excesses, veiling, and mean Ha equivalent widths, members of the stochastic LC class have only moderate time-averaged mass accretion rates. The most common feature of their Ha profiles is for them to exhibit blue-shifted absorption features, most likely originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the LCs suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.
  • We present new spectroscopy and astrometry to characterize the nearby brown dwarf WISEP J180026.60+013453.1. The optical spectral type, L7.5, is in agreement with the previously reported near-infrared spectral type. The preliminary trigonometric parallax places it at a distance of $8.01 \pm 0.21$ pc, confirming that it is the fourth closest known late-L (L7-L9) dwarf. The measured luminosity, our detection of lithium, and the lack of low surface gravity indicators indicates that WISEP J180026.60+013453.1 has a mass $0.03 < M < 0.06 M_\odot$ and an age between 300 million and 1.5 billion years according to theoretical substellar evolution models. The low space motion is consistent with this young age. We have measured the rotational broadening ($v \sin i = 13.5 \pm 0.5$ km/s), and use it to estimate a maximum rotation period of 9.3 hr.
  • The classical T Tauri star AA Tau presented photometric variability attributed to an inner disk warp, caused by the interaction between the inner disk and an inclined magnetosphere. Previous studies of NGC 2264 have shown that similar photometric behavior is common among CTTS. The goal of this work is to investigate the main causes of the observed photometric variability of CTTS in NGC 2264 that present AA Tau-like light curves, and verify if an inner disk warp could be responsible for their variability. We investigate veiling variability in their spectra and u-r color variations and estimate parameters of the inner disk warp using an occultation model proposed for AA Tau. We compare infrared and optical light curves to analyze the dust responsible for the occultations. AA Tau-like variability is transient on a timescale of a few years. We ascribe it to stable accretion regimes and aperiodic variability to unstable accretion regimes and show that a transition, and even coexistence, between the two is common. We find evidence of hot spots associated with occultations, indicating that the occulting structures could be located at the base of accretion columns. We find average values of warp maximum height of 0.23 times its radial location, consistent with AA Tau, with variations of on average 11% between rotation cycles. We show that extinction laws in the inner disk indicate the presence of grains larger than interstellar grains. The inner disk warp scenario is consistent with observations for all but one periodic star in our sample. AA Tau-like systems comprise 14% of CTTS observed in NGC 2264, though this increases to 35% among systems of mass 0.7M_sun<M<2.0M_sun. Assuming random inclinations, we estimate that nearly all systems in this mass range likely possess an inner disk warp, possibly because of a change in magnetic field configurations among stars of lower mass.
  • We identify nine young stellar objects (YSOs) in the NGC 2264 star-forming region with optical {\em CoRoT} light curves exhibiting short-duration, shallow, periodic flux dips. All of these stars have infrared (IR) excesses that are consistent with their having inner disk walls near the Keplerian co-rotation radius. The repeating photometric dips have FWHM generally less than one day, depths almost always less than 15%, and periods (3<P<11 days) consistent with dust near the Keplerian co-rotation period. The flux dips vary considerably in their depth from epoch to epoch, but usually persist for several weeks and, in two cases, were present in data collected on successive years. For several of these stars, we also measure the photospheric rotation period and find that the rotation and dip periods are the same, as predicted by standard "disk-locking" models. We attribute these flux dips to clumps of material in or near the inner disk wall, passing through our line of sight to the stellar photosphere. In some cases, these dips are also present in simultaneous {\em Spitzer} IRAC light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. We characterize the properties of these dips, and compare the stars with light curves exhibiting this behavior to other classes of YSO in NGC 2264. A number of physical mechanisms could locally increase the dust scale height near the inner disk wall, and we discuss several of those mechanisms; the most plausible mechanisms are either a disk warp due to interaction with the stellar magnetic field or dust entrained in funnel-flow accretion columns arising near the inner disk wall.
  • We present new BVIc photometry for 350 Pleiades proper-motion members with 9 < V < 17. Importantly, our new catalog includes a large number of K and early-M type stars, roughly doubling the number of low-mass stars with well calibrated Johnson/Cousins photometry in this benchmark cluster. We combine our new photometry with existing photometry from the literature to define a purely empirical isochrone at Pleiades age (~100 Myr) extending from V=9 to 17. We use the empirical isochrone to identify 48 new probable binaries and 14 likely non-members.The photometrically identified single stars are compared against their expected positions in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). At 100 Myr, the mid K and early M stars are predicted to lie above the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) having not yet reached the ZAMS. We find in the B-V vs. V CMD that mid K and early M dwarfs are instead displaced below (or blueward of) the ZAMS. Using the stars' previously reported rotation periods, we find a highly statistically significant correlation between rotation period and CMD displacement, in the sense that the more rapidly rotating stars have the largest displacements in the B- V CMD.
  • We present the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a continuous 30-day multi-wavelength photometric monitoring campaign on more than 1000 young cluster members using 16 telescopes. The unprecedented combination of multi-wavelength, high-precision, high-cadence, and long-duration data opens a new window into the time domain behavior of young stellar objects. Here we provide an overview of the observations, focusing on results from Spitzer and CoRoT. The highlight of this work is detailed analysis of 162 classical T Tauri stars for which we can probe optical and mid-infrared flux variations to 1% amplitudes and sub-hour timescales. We present a morphological variability census and then use metrics of periodicity, stochasticity, and symmetry to statistically separate the light curves into seven distinct classes, which we suggest represent different physical processes and geometric effects. We provide distributions of the characteristic timescales and amplitudes, and assess the fractional representation within each class. The largest category (>20%) are optical "dippers" having discrete fading events lasting ~1-5 days. The degree of correlation between the optical and infrared light curves is positive but weak; notably, the independently assigned optical and infrared morphology classes tend to be different for the same object. Assessment of flux variation behavior with respect to (circum)stellar properties reveals correlations of variability parameters with H$\alpha$ emission and with effective temperature. Overall, our results point to multiple origins of young star variability, including circumstellar obscuration events, hot spots on the star and/or disk, accretion bursts, and rapid structural changes in the inner disk.
  • Based on more than four weeks of continuous high cadence photometric monitoring of several hundred members of the young cluster NGC 2264 with two space telescopes, NASA's Spitzer and the CNES CoRoT (Convection, Rotation, and planetary Transits), we provide high quality, multi-wavelength light curves for young stellar objects (YSOs) whose optical variability is dominated by short duration flux bursts, which we infer are due to enhanced mass accretion rates. These light curves show many brief -- several hour to one day -- brightenings at optical and near-infrared (IR) wavelengths with amplitudes generally in the range 5-50% of the quiescent value. Typically, a dozen or more of these bursts occur in a thirty day period. We demonstrate that stars exhibiting this type of variability have large ultraviolet (UV) excesses and dominate the portion of the u-g vs. g-r color-color diagram with the largest UV excesses. These stars also have large Halpha equivalent widths, and either centrally peaked, lumpy Halpha emission profiles or profiles with blue-shifted absorption dips associated with disk or stellar winds. Light curves of this type have been predicted for stars whose accretion is dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the boundary between their magnetosphere and inner circumstellar disk, or where magneto-rotational instabilities modulate the accretion rate from the inner disk. Amongst the stars with the largest UV excesses or largest Halpha equivalent widths, light curves with this type of variability greatly outnumber light curves with relatively smooth sinusoidal variations associated with long-lived hot spots. We provide quantitative statistics for the average duration and strength of the accretion bursts and for the fraction of the accretion luminosity associated with these bursts.
  • We report on the results of fifteen months of monitoring the nearby field L1 dwarf WISEP J190648.47+401106.8 (W1906+40) with the Kepler mission. Supporting observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and Gemini North telescope reveal that the L dwarf is magnetically active, with quiescent radio and variable H$\alpha$ emission. A preliminary trigonometric parallax shows that W1906+40 is at a distance of $16.35^{+0.36}_{-0.34}$ pc, and all observations are consistent with W1906+40 being an old disk star just above the hydrogen-burning limit. The star shows photometric variability with a period of 8.9 hours and an amplitude of 1.5%, with a consistent phase throughout the year. We infer a radius of $0.92 \pm 0.07 R_J$ and $\sin i > 0.57$ from the observed period, luminosity ($10^{-3.67 \pm 0.03} L_\odot$), effective temperature ($2300 \pm 75$K), and $v \sin i$ ($11.2 \pm 2.2$ km/s). The light curve may be modeled with a single large, high latitude dark spot. Unlike many L-type brown dwarfs, there is no evidence of other variations at the $\gtrsim 2%$ level, either non-periodic or transient periodic, that mask the underlying rotation period. We suggest that the long-lived surface features may be due to starspots, but the possibility of cloud variations cannot be ruled out without further multi-wavelength observations. During the Gemini spectroscopy, we observed the most powerful flare ever seen on an L dwarf, with an estimated energy of $\sim 1.6 \times 10^{32}$ ergs in white light emission. Using the Kepler data, we identify similar flares and estimate that white light flares with optical/ultraviolet energies of $10^{31}$ ergs or more occur on W1906+40 as often as 1-2 times per month.
  • We report the discovery of an unusually red brown dwarf found in a search for high proper motion objects using WISE and 2MASS data. WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 is moving at 0.44$ arcsec/yr and lies relatively close to the Galactic Plane (b=5.2 degrees). Near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy reveals that this is one of the reddest (2MASS J-K_s = 2.55 +/- 0.08 mag) field L dwarfs yet detected, making this object an important member of the class of unusually red L dwarfs. We discuss evidence for thick condensate clouds and speculate on the age of the object. Although models by different research groups agree that thick clouds can explain the red spectrum, they predict dramatically different effective temperatures, ranging from 1100K to 1600K. This brown dwarf is well suited for additional studies of extremely dusty substellar atmospheres because it is relatively bright (K_s = 13.05 +/- 0.03 mag), which should also contribute to an improved understanding of young gas-giant planets and the transition between L and T brown dwarfs.
  • We report parallax measurements for 70 ultracool dwarfs (UCDs). Using both literature values and our sample, we report new polynomial relations between spectral type and M$_{JHK}$. Including resolved L/T transition binaries in the relations, we find no reason to differentiate between a "bright" (unresolved binary) and "faint" (single source) sample across the L/T boundary. Isolating early T dwarfs, we find that the brightening of T0-T4 sources is prominent in M$_{J}$ where there is a [1.2 - 1.4] magnitude difference. A similar yet dampened brightening of [0.3 - 0.5] magnitude happens at M$_{H}$ and a plateau or dimming of [-0.2 - -0.3] magnitude is seen in M$_{K}$. Comparing with evolutionary models that vary gravity, metallicity, and cloud thickness we find that a near constant temperature of 1200 $\pm$100 K along a narrow spectral subtype of T0-T4 is required to account for the brightening and color magnitude diagram of the L-dwarf/T-dwarf transition. Furthermore, there is a significant population of both L and T dwarfs which are red or potentially "ultra-cloudy" compared to the models, many of which are known to be young indicating a correlation between enhanced photospheric dust and youth. For the low surface-gravity or young companion L dwarfs we find that 8 out of 10 are at least [0.2-1.0] magnitude underluminous in M$_{JH}$ and/or M$_{K}$ compared to equivalent spectral type objects. We speculate that this is a consequence of increased dust opacity and conclude that low-surface gravity L dwarfs require a completely new spectral-type/absolute magnitude polynomial for analysis.
  • The prototype of accreting, pulsating white dwarfs (GW Lib) underwent a large amplitude dwarf nova outburst in 2007. We used ultraviolet data from GALEX and ground-based optical photometry and spectroscopy to follow GW Lib for three years following this outburst. Several variations are apparent during this interval. The optical shows a superhump modulation in the months following outburst while a 19 min quasi-periodic modulation lasting for several months is apparent in the year after outburst. A long timescale (about 4 hr) modulation first appears in the UV a year after outburst and increases in amplitude in the following years. This variation also appears in the optical 2 years after outburst but is not in phase with the UV. The pre-outburst pulsations are not yet visible after 3 years, likely indicating the white dwarf has not returned to its quiescent state.
  • Trigonometric parallaxes of 16 nearby planetary nebulae are presented, including reduced errors for seven objects with previous initial results and results for six new objects. The median error in the parallax is 0.42 mas, and twelve nebulae have parallax errors less than 20 percent. The parallax for PHL932 is found here to be smaller than was measured by Hipparcos, and this peculiar object is discussed. Comparisons are made with other distance estimates. The distances determined from these parallaxes tend to be intermediate between some short distance estimates and other long estimates; they are somewhat smaller than estimated from spectra of the central stars. Proper motions and tangential velocities are presented. No astrometric perturbations from unresolved close companions are detected.
  • We report the discovery of a double-lined, spectroscopic, eclipsing binary in the Orion star-forming region. We analyze the system spectroscopically and photometrically to empirically determine precise, distance-independent masses, radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities for both components. The measured masses for the primary and secondary, accurate to ~1%, are 1.01 Msun and 0.73 Msun, respectively; thus the primary is a definitive pre-main-sequence solar analog, and the secondary is the lowest-mass star yet discovered among pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary systems. We use these fundamental measurements to test the predictions of pre-main-sequence stellar evolutionary tracks. None of the models we examined correctly predict the masses of the two components simultaneously, and we implicate differences between the theoretical and empirical effective temperature scales for this failing. All of the models predict the observed slope of the mass-radius relationship reasonably well, though the observations tend to favor models with low convection efficiencies. Indeed, considering our newly determined mass measurements together with other dynamical mass measurements of pre-main-sequence stars in the literature, as well as measurements of Li abundances in these stars, we show that the data strongly favor evolutionary models with inefficient convection in the stellar interior, even though such models cannot reproduce the properties of the present-day Sun.
  • Results of an international campaign to photometrically monitor the unique pre-main sequence eclipsing object KH 15D are reported. An updated ephemeris for the eclipse is derived that incorporates a slightly revised period of 48.36 d. There is some evidence that the orbital period is actually twice that value, with two eclipses occurring per cycle. The extraordinary depth (~3.5 mag) and duration (~18 days) of the eclipse indicate that it is caused by circumstellar matter, presumably the inner portion of a disk. The eclipse has continued to lengthen with time and the central brightness reversals are not as extreme as they once were. V-R and V-I colors indicate that the system is slightly bluer near minimum light. Ingress and egress are remarkably well modeled by the passage of a knife-edge across a limb-darkened star. Possible models for the system are briefly discussed.
  • We use mid-IR (primarily 10 $\mu$m) photometry as a diagnostic for the presence of disks with inner cavities among 32 pre-main sequence stars in Orion and Taurus-Auriga for which rotation periods are known and which do not show evidence for inner disks at near-IR wavelengths. Disks with inner cavities are predicted by magnetic disk-locking models that seek to explain the regulation of angular momentum in T Tauri stars. Only three stars in our sample show evidence for excess mid-IR emission. While these three stars may possess truncated disks consistent with magnetic disk-locking models, the remaining 29 stars in our sample do not. Apparently, stars lacking near-IR excesses in general do not possess truncated disks to which they are magnetically coupled. We discuss the implications of this result for the hypothesis of disk-regulated angular momentum. Evidently, young stars can exist as slow rotators without the aid of present disk-locking, and there exist very young stars already rotating near breakup velocity whose subsequent angular momentum evolution will not be regulated by disks. Moreover, we question whether disks, when present, truncate in the manner required by disk-locking scenarios. Finally, we discuss the need for rotational evolution models to take full account of the large dispersion of rotation rates present at 1 Myr, which may allow the models to explain the rotational evolution of low-mass pre-main sequence stars in a way that does not depend upon braking by disks.
  • Deep I-band imaging to approximately I = 26.5 of the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 1900+14 region has revealed a compact cluster of massive stars located only a few arcseconds from the fading radio source thought to be the location of the SGR (Frail, Kulkarni, & Bloom 1999). This cluster was previously hidden in the glare of the pair of M5 supergiant stars (whose light was removed by PSF subtraction) proposed by Vrba et al. (1996) as likely associated with the SGR 1900+14. The cluster has at least 13 members within a cluster radius of approximately 0.6 pc, based on an estimated distance of 12-15 kpc. It is remarkably similar to a cluster found associated with SGR 1806-20 (Fuchs et al. 1999). That similar clusters have now been found at or near the positions of the two best-studied SGRs suggests that young neutron stars, thought to be responsible for the SGR phenomenon, have their origins in proximate compact clusters of massive stars.