• We propose a new approach for multiverse analysis based on computational complexity, which leads to a new family of "computational" measure factors. By defining a cosmology as a space-time containing a vacuum with specified properties (for example small cosmological constant) together with rules for how time evolution will produce the vacuum, we can associate global time in a multiverse with clock time on a supercomputer which simulates it. We argue for a principle of "limited computational complexity" governing early universe dynamics as simulated by this supercomputer, which translates to a global measure for regulating the infinities of eternal inflation. The rules for time evolution can be thought of as a search algorithm, whose details should be constrained by a stronger principle of "minimal computational complexity." Unlike previously studied global measures, ours avoids standard equilibrium considerations and the well-known problems of Boltzmann Brains and the youngness paradox. We also give various definitions of the computational complexity of a cosmology, and argue that there are only a few natural complexity classes. (v2: version submitted for publication: clarified section 5.3; added references) (v3: added discussion of marginally hospitable vacua. Version to appear in Annals of Physics)
  • We analyze the low temperature structure of a supersymmetric quiver quantum mechanics with randomized superpotential coefficients, treating them as quenched disorder. These theories describe features of the low energy dynamics of wrapped branes, which in large number backreact into extremal black holes. We show that the low temperature theory, in the limit of a large number of bifundamentals, exhibits a time reparametrization symmetry as well as a specific heat linear in the temperature. Both these features resemble the behavior of black hole horizons in the zero temperature limit. We demonstrate similarities between the low temperature physics of the random quiver model and a theory of large $N$ free fermions with random masses.
  • We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kahler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit. We discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.
  • We present a new class of ${\cal N}=4$ supersymmetric quiver matrix models and argue that it describes the stringy low-energy dynamics of internally wrapped D-branes in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) flux compactifications. The Lagrangians of these models differ from previously studied quiver matrix models by the presence of mass terms, associated with the AdS gravitational potential, as well as additional terms dictated by supersymmetry. These give rise to dynamical phenomena typically associated with the presence of fluxes, such as fuzzy membranes, internal cyclotron motion and the appearance of confining strings. We also show how these models can be obtained by dimensional reduction of four-dimensional supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on a three-sphere.
  • We discuss further aspects of the higher spin dS/CFT correspondence. Using a recent result of Dunne and Kirsten, it is shown how to numerically compute the partition function of the free Sp(N) model for a large class of SO(3) preserving deformations of the flat/round metric on R^3/S^3 and the source of the spin-zero single-trace operator dual to the bulk scalar. We interpret this partition function as a Hartle-Hawking wavefunctional. It has a local maximum about the pure de Sitter vacuum. Restricting to SO(3) preserving deformations, other local maxima (which exceed the one near the de Sitter vacuum) can peak at inhomogeneous and anisotropic values of the late time metric and scalar profile. Numerical experiments suggest the remarkable observation that, upon fixing a certain average of the bulk scalar profile at I^+, the wavefunction becomes normalizable in all the other (infinite) directions of the deformation. We elucidate the meaning of double trace deformations in the context of dS/CFT as a change of basis and as a convolution. Finally, we discuss possible extensions of higher spin de Sitter holography by coupling the free theory to a Chern-Simons term.
  • We establish the existence of stable and metastable stationary black hole bound states at finite temperature and chemical potentials in global and planar four-dimensional asymptotically anti-de Sitter space. We determine a number of features of their holographic duals and argue they represent structural glasses. We map out their thermodynamic landscape in the probe approximation, and show their relaxation dynamics exhibits logarithmic aging, with aging rates determined by the distribution of barriers.
  • We initiate a systematic study of the dynamics of multi-particle systems with supersymmetric Van der Waals and electron-monopole type interactions. The static interaction allows a complex continuum of ground state configurations, while the Lorentz interaction tends to counteract this configurational fluidity by magnetic trapping, thus producing an exotic low temperature phase of matter aptly named supergoop. Such systems arise naturally in $\mathcal{N}=2$ gauge theories as monopole-dyon mixtures, and in string theory as collections of particles or black holes obtained by wrapping D-branes on internal space cycles. After discussing the general system and its relation to quiver quantum mechanics, we focus on the case of three particles. We give an exhaustive enumeration of the classical and quantum ground states of a probe in an arbitrary background with two fixed centers. We uncover a hidden conserved charge and show that the dynamics of the probe is classically integrable. In contrast, the dynamics of one heavy and two light particles moving on a line shows a nontrivial transition to chaos, which we exhibit by studying the Poincar\'e sections. Finally we explore the complex dynamics of a probe particle in a background with a large number of centers, observing hints of ergodicity breaking. We conclude by discussing possible implications in a holographic context.
  • We study the partition function of the free Sp(N) conformal field theory recently conjectured to be dual to asymptotically de Sitter higher-spin gravity in four-dimensions. We compute the partition function of this CFT on a round sphere as a function of a finite mass deformation, on a squashed sphere as a function of the squashing parameter, and on an S2xS1 geometry as a function of the relative size of S2 and S1. We find that the partition function is divergent at large negative mass in the first case, and for small $S^1$ in the third case. It is globally peaked at zero squashing in the second case. Through the duality this partition function contains information about the wave function of the universe. We show that the divergence at small S1 occurs also in Einstein gravity if certain complex solutions are included, but the divergence in the mass parameter is new. We suggest an interpretation for this divergence as indicating an instability of de Sitter space in higher spin gravity, consistent with general arguments that de Sitter space cannot be stable in quantum gravity.
  • We show that the late time Hartle-Hawking wave function for a free massless scalar in a fixed de Sitter background encodes a sharp ultrametric structure for the standard Euclidean distance on the space of field configurations. This implies a hierarchical, tree-like organization of the state space, reflecting its genesis as a branched diffusion process. An equivalent mathematical structure organizes the state space of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model of a spin glass.
  • We initiate a systematic study of the state space of non-extremal, stationary black hole bound states in four-dimensional N = 2 supergravity. Specifically, we show that an exponential multitude of classically stable "halo" bound states can be formed between large finite temperature D4-D0 black hole cores and much smaller, arbitrarily charged black holes at the same temperature. We map out in full the regions of existence for thermodynamically stable and metastable bound states in terms of the core's charges and temperature, as well as the region of stability of the core itself. Several features of these systems, such as a macroscopic configurational entropy and exponential relaxation timescales, are similar to those of the extended family of glasses. We draw parallels between the two with a view toward understanding complex systems in fundamental physics.
  • These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.
  • In four dimensional N=2 supergravity theories, BPS bound states near marginal stability are described by configurations of widely separated constituents with nearly parallel central charges. When the vacuum moduli can be dialed adiabatically until the central charges become anti -parallel, a paradox arises. We show that this paradox is always resolved by the existence of "bound state transformation walls" across which the nature of the bound state changes, although the index does not jump. We find that there are two distinct phenomena that can take place on these walls, which we call recombination and conjugation. The latter is associated to the presence of singularities at finite distance in moduli space. Consistency of conjugation and wall-crossing rules near these singularities leads to new constraints on the BPS spectrum. Singular loci supporting massless vector bosons are particularly subtle in this respect. We argue that the spectrum at such loci necessarily contains massless magnetic monopoles, and that bound states around them transform by intricate hybrids of conjugation and recombination.
  • We give an elementary physical derivation of the Kontsevich-Soibelman wall crossing formula, valid for any theory with a 4d N=2 supergravity description. Our argument leads to a slight generalization of the formula, which relates monodromy to the BPS spectrum.
  • We derive an expression for functional determinants in thermal spacetimes as a product over the corresponding quasinormal modes. As simple applications we give efficient computations of scalar determinants in thermal AdS, BTZ black hole and de Sitter spacetimes. We emphasize the conceptual utility of our formula for discussing `1/N' corrections to strongly coupled field theories via the holographic correspondence.
  • We show that strongly coupled field theories with holographic gravity duals at finite charge density and low temperatures can undergo de Haas - van Alphen quantum oscillations as a function of an external magnetic field. Exhibiting this effect requires computation of the one loop contribution of charged bulk fermions to the free energy. The one loop calculation is performed using a formula expressing determinants in black hole backgrounds as sums over quasinormal modes. At zero temperature, the periodic nonanalyticities in the magnetic susceptibility as a function of the inverse magnetic field depend on the low energy scaling behavior of fermionic operators in the field theory, and are found to be softer than in weakly coupled theories. We also obtain numerical and WKB results for the quasinormal modes of charged bosons in dyonic black hole backgrounds, finding evidence for nontrivial periodic behavior as a function of the magnetic field.
  • The AdS/CFT correspondence may connect the landscape of string vacua and the `atomic landscape' of condensed matter physics. We study the stability of a landscape of IR fixed points of N=2 large N gauge theories in 2+1 dimensions, dual to Sasaki-Einstein compactifications of M theory, towards a superconducting state. By exhibiting instabilities of charged black holes in these compactifications, we show that many of these theories have charged operators that condense when the theory is placed at a finite chemical potential. We compute a statistical distribution of critical superconducting temperatures for a subset of these theories. With a chemical potential of one milliVolt, we find critical temperatures ranging between 0.24 and 165 degrees Kelvin.
  • By T-dualizing space-filling D-branes in IIB orientifold compactifications along the three non-internal spatial directions, we obtain black hole bound states living in a universe with a gauged spatial reflection symmetry. We call these objects orientiholes. The gravitational entropy of various IIA orientihole configurations provides an "experimental" estimate of the number of vacua in various sectors of the IIB landscape. Furthermore, basic physical properties of orientiholes map to (sometimes subtle) microscopic features, thus providing a useful alternative viewpoint on a number of issues arising in D-brane model building. More generally, we give orientihole generalizations of recently derived wall crossing formulae, and conjecture a relation to the topological string analogous to the OSV conjecture, but with a linear rather than a quadratic identification of partition functions.
  • With model building applications in mind, we collect and develop basic techniques to analyze the landscape of D7-branes in type IIB compact Calabi-Yau orientifolds, in three different pictures: F-theory, the D7 worldvolume theory and D9-anti-D9 tachyon condensation. A significant complication is that consistent D7-branes in the presence of O7^- planes are generically singular, with singularities locally modeled by the Whitney Umbrella. This invalidates the standard formulae for charges, moduli space and flux lattice dimensions. We infer the correct formulae by comparison to F-theory and derive them independently and more generally from the tachyon picture, and relate these numbers to the closed string massless spectrum of the orientifold compactification in an interesting way. We furthermore give concrete recipes to explicitly and systematically construct nontrivial D-brane worldvolume flux vacua in arbitrary Calabi-Yau orientifolds, illustrate how to read off D-brane flux content, enhanced gauge groups and charged matter spectra from tachyon matrices, and demonstrate how brane recombination in general leads to flux creation, as required by charge conservation and by equivalence of geometric and gauge theory moduli spaces.
  • These lectures give a detailed introduction to constructing and analyzing string vacua suitable for phenomenological model building, with particular emphasis on F-theory flux vacua. Topics include (1) general challenges and overview of some proposed scenarios, (2) an extensive introduction to F-theory and its relation to M-theory and perturbative IIB string theory, (3) F-theory flux vacua and moduli stabilization scenarios, (4) a practical geometrical toolkit for constructing string vacua from scratch, (5) statistics of flux vacua, and (6) explicit models.
  • We systematically construct the geometries dual to the 1+1 dimensional (0,4) conformal field theories that arise in the low-energy description of wrapped M5-branes in S^1 x CY_3 compactifications of M-theory. This includes a large number of multicentered black hole bound states asymptotic to AdS_3 x S^2. In addition, we find many geometries that develop multiple, mutually decoupled AdS_3 x S^2 throats. We argue there is a useful one to one correspondence between the connected components of the space of solutions and particular limits of type IIA attractor flow trees. We point out that there is a thermodynamic instability of small supersymmetric BTZ black holes to localization on the S^2, a supersymmetric and exactly solvable analog of the well known AdS-Schwarzschild localization instability, and identify this with the ``Entropy Enigma'' in four dimensions. We discuss the phase transition this suggests, and initiate the CFT interpretation of these results.
  • We investigate degeneracies of BPS states of D-branes on compact Calabi-Yau manifolds. We develop a factorization formula for BPS indices using attractor flow trees associated to multicentered black hole bound states. This enables us to study background dependence of the BPS spectrum, to compute explicitly exact indices of various nontrivial D-brane systems, and to clarify the subtle relation of Donaldson-Thomas invariants to BPS indices of stable D6-D2-D0 states, realized in supergravity as "hole halos". We introduce a convergent generating function for D4 indices in the large CY volume limit, and prove it can be written as a modular average of its polar part, generalizing the fareytail expansion of the elliptic genus. We show polar states are "split" D6-anti-D6 bound states, and that the partition function factorizes accordingly, leading to a refined version of the OSV conjecture. This differs from the original conjecture in several aspects. In particular we obtain a nontrivial measure factor g_{top}^{-2} e^{-K} and find factorization requires a cutoff. We show that the main factor determining the cutoff and therefore the error is the existence of "swing states" -- D6 states which exist at large radius but do not form stable D6-anti-D6 bound states. We point out a likely breakdown of the OSV conjecture at small g_{top} (in the large background CY volume limit), due to the surprising phenomenon that for sufficiently large background Kahler moduli, a charge N Q supporting single centered black holes of entropy ~ N^2 S(Q) also admits two-centered BPS black hole realizations whose entropy grows like N^3 at large N.
  • The Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of certain black holes can be computed microscopically in string theory by mapping the elusive problem of counting microstates of a strongly gravitating black hole to the tractable problem of counting microstates of a weakly coupled D-brane system, which has no event horizon, and indeed comfortably fits on the head of a pin. We show here that, contrary to widely held beliefs, the entropy of spherically symmetric black holes can easily be dwarfed by that of stationary multi-black-hole ``molecules'' of the same total charge and energy. Thus, the corresponding pin-sized D-brane systems do not even approximately count the microstates of a single black hole, but rather those of a zoo of entropically dominant multicentered configurations.
  • A D4-D0 black hole can be deconstructed into a bound state of D0 branes with a D6-anti-D6 pair containing worldvolume fluxes. The exact spacetime solution is known and resembles a D0 accretion disk surrounding a D6-anti-D6 core. We find a scaling limit in which the disk and core drop inside an AdS_2 throat. Crossing this AdS_2 throat and the D0 accretion disk into the core, we find a second scaling region describing the D6-anti-D6 pair. It is shown that the M-theory lift of this region is AdS_3 x S^2. Surprisingly, time translations in the far asymptotic region reduce to global, rather than Poincare, time translations in this core AdS_3. We further find that the quantum mechanical ground state degeneracy reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy-area law.
  • We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.
  • We study the computational complexity of the physical problem of finding vacua of string theory which agree with data, such as the cosmological constant, and show that such problems are typically NP hard. In particular, we prove that in the Bousso-Polchinski model, the problem is NP complete. We discuss the issues this raises and the possibility that, even if we were to find compelling evidence that some vacuum of string theory describes our universe, we might never be able to find that vacuum explicitly. In a companion paper, we apply this point of view to the question of how early cosmology might select a vacuum.