• Honeycomb structures of group IV elements can host massless Dirac fermions with non-trivial Berry phases. Their potential for electronic applications has attracted great interest and spurred a broad search for new Dirac materials especially in monolayer structures. We present a detailed investigation of the \beta 12 boron sheet, which is a borophene structure that can form spontaneously on a Ag(111) surface. Our tight-binding analysis revealed that the lattice of the \beta 12-sheet could be decomposed into two triangular sublattices in a way similar to that for a honeycomb lattice, thereby hosting Dirac cones. Furthermore, each Dirac cone could be split by introducing periodic perturbations representing overlayer-substrate interactions. These unusual electronic structures were confirmed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and validated by first-principles calculations. Our results suggest monolayer boron as a new platform for realizing novel high-speed low-dissipation devices.
  • We determine the band structure and spin texture of WTe2 by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES). With the support of first-principles calculations, we reveal the existence of spin polarization of both the Fermi arc surface states and bulk Fermi pockets. Our results support WTe2 to be a type-II Weyl semimetal candidate and provide important information to understand its extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance.
  • The search for metallic boron allotropes has attracted great attention in the past decades and recent theoretical works predict the existence of metallicity in monolayer boron. Here, we synthesize the \b{eta}12-sheet monolayer boron on a Ag(111) surface and confirm the presence of metallic boron-derived bands using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Fermi surface is composed of one electron pocket at the S point and a pair of hole pockets near the X point, which is supported by the first-principles calculations. The metallic boron allotrope in \b{eta}12 sheet opens the way to novel physics and chemistry in material science.
  • We describe a spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SARPES) apparatus with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser ($h\nu$= 6.994 eV) developed at the Laser and Synchrotron Research Center at the Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo. The spectrometer consists of a hemispherical photoelectron analyzer equipped with an electron deflector function and twin very-low-energy-electron-diffraction-type spin detectors, which allows us to analyze the spin vector of a photoelectron three-dimensionally with both high energy and angular resolutions. The combination of the high-performance spectrometer and the high-photon-flux VUV laser can achieve an energy resolution of 1.7 meV for SARPES. We demonstrate that the present laser-SARPES machine realizes a quick SARPES on the spin-split band structure of a Bi(111) film even with 7 meV energy and 0.7$^\circ$ angular resolutions along the entrance-slit direction. This laser-SARPES machine is applicable to the investigation of spin-dependent electronic states on an energy scale of a few meV.
  • A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that host Weyl fermions as quasiparticle excitations. The Weyl fermions at zero energy correspond to points of bulk band degeneracy, Weyl nodes, which are separated in momentum space and are connected only through the crystal's boundary by an exotic Fermi arc surface state. We experimentally measure the spin polarization of the Fermi arcs in the first experimentally discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. Our spin data, for the first time, reveal that the Fermi arcs' spin polarization magnitude is as large as 80% and possesses a spin texture that is completely in-plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the chirality of the Weyl nodes in TaAs cannot be inferred by the spin texture of the Fermi arcs. The observed non-degenerate property of the Fermi arcs is important for the establishment of its exact topological nature, which reveal that spins on the arc form a novel type of 2D matter. Additionally, the nearly full spin polarization we observed (~80%) may be useful in spintronic applications.
  • Au-induced atomic wires on the Ge(001) surface were recently claimed to be an ideal 1D metal and their tunneling spectra were analyzed as the manifestation of a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) state. We reinvestigate this system for atomically well-ordered areas of the surface with high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STS). The local density-of-states maps do not provide any evidence of a metallic 1D electron channel along the wires. Moreover, the atomically resolved tunneling spectra near the Fermi energy are dominated by local density-of-states features, deviating qualitatively from the power-law behavior. On the other hand, the defects strongly affect the tunneling spectra near the Fermi level. These results do not support the possibility of a TLL state for this system. An 1D metallic system with well-defined 1D bands and without defects are required for the STS study of a TLL state.
  • Electron scattering in the topological surface state (TSS) of the bulk-insulating topological insulator Bi$_{1.5}$Sb$_{0.5}$Te$_{1.7}$Se$_{1.3}$ was studied using quasiparticle interference observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. It was found that not only the 180$^{\circ}$ backscattering but also a wide range of backscattering angles of 100$^{\circ}$--180$^{\circ}$ is effectively prohibited in the TSS. This conclusion was obtained by comparing the observed scattering vectors with the diameters of the constant-energy contours of the TSS, which were measured for both occupied and unoccupied states using time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The unexpectedly robust protection from backscattering in the TSS is a good news for applications, but it poses a challenge to the theoretical understanding of the transport in the TSS.
  • We present a new method of producing a densely ordered array of epitaxial graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) using vicinal SiC surfaces as a template, which consist of ordered pairs of (0001) terraces and nanofacets. Controlled selective growth of graphene on approximately 10 nm wide of (0001) terraces with 10 nm spatial intervals allows GNR formation. By selecting the vicinal direction of SiC substrate, [1-100], well-ordered GNRs with predominantly armchair edges are obtained. These structures, the high density GNRs, enable us to observe the electronic structure at K-points by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, showing clear band-gap opening of at least 0.14 eV.
  • Spin-polarized band structure of the three-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulator $\rm Bi_{1-x}Sb_{x}$ (x=0.12-0.13) was fully elucidated by spin-polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy using a high-yield spin polarimeter equipped with a high-resolution electron spectrometer. Between the two time-reversal-invariant points, $\bar{\varGamma}$ and $\bar{M}$, of the (111) surface Brillouin zone, a spin-up band ($\Sigma_3$ band) was found to cross the Fermi energy only once, providing unambiguous evidence for the strong topological insulator phase. The observed spin-polarized band dispersions determine the "mirror chirality" to be -1, which agrees with the theoretical prediction based on first-principles calculations.
  • Nonlocal one-dimensional motions of a topological defect are induced by electron tunneling through the dangling-bond states on the clean Ge(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy below 80 K. The direction of the motion depends both on the energy of the carriers in the surface state and on the distance between the defect and the tunneling point. The results are interpreted using an electronic excitation model by hot carriers injected to the surface states. The critical distance of the motion is anisotropic and consistent with the band structure of the surface states.
  • The reconstruction on Ge(001) surface is locally and reversibly changed between c(4x2) and p(2x2) by controlling the bias voltage of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at 80K. It is c(4x2) with the sample bias voltage V_b =< -0.7V. This structure can be kept with V_b =< 0.6V. When V_b is higher than 0.8V during the scanning, the structure changes to p(2x2). This structure is then maintained with V_b >= - 0.6V. The observed local change of the reconstruction with hysteresis is ascribed to inelastic scattering during the electron tunneling in the electric field under the STM-tip.