• The debris disk around $\beta$ Pictoris is known to contain gas. Previous ALMA observations revealed a CO belt at $\sim$85 au with a distinct clump, interpreted as a location of enhanced gas production. Photodissociation converts CO into C and O within $\sim$50 years. We resolve CI emission at 492 GHz using ALMA and study its spatial distribution. CI shows the same clump as seen for CO. This is surprising, as C is expected to quickly spread in azimuth. We derive a low C mass (between $4\times10^{-4}$ and $2.2\times10^{-3}$ M$_\oplus$), indicating that gas production started only recently (within $\sim$5000 years). No evidence is seen for an atomic accretion disk inwards of the CO belt, perhaps because the gas did not yet have time to spread radially. The fact that C and CO share the same asymmetry argues against a previously proposed scenario where the clump is due to an outward migrating planet trapping planetesimals in an resonance; nor can the observations be explained by an eccentric planetesimal belt secularly forced by a planet. Instead, we suggest that the dust and gas disks should be eccentric. Such a configuration, we further speculate, might be produced by a recent tidal disruption event. Assuming that the disrupted body has had a CO mass fraction of 10%, its total mass would be $\sim$3 $M_\mathrm{Moon}$.
  • We present far-infrared and submillimeter maps from the Herschel Space Observatory and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope of the debris disk host star AU Microscopii. Disk emission is detected at 70, 160, 250, 350, 450, 500 and 850 micron. The disk is resolved at 70, 160 and 450 micron. In addition to the planetesimal belt, we detect thermal emission from AU Mic's halo for the first time. In contrast to the scattered light images, no asymmetries are evident in the disk. The fractional luminosity of the disk is $3.9 \times 10^{-4}$ and its mm-grain dust mass is 0.01 MEarth (+/- 20%). We create a simple spatial model that reconciles the disk SED as a blackbody of 53 +/- 2 K (a composite of 39 and 50 K components) and the presence of small (non-blackbody) grains which populate the extended halo. The best fit model is consistent with the "birth ring" model explored in earlier works, i.e., an edge-on dust belt extending from 8.8-40 AU, but with an additional halo component with an $r^{-1.5}$ surface density profile extending to the limits of sensitivity (140 AU). We confirm that AU Mic does not exert enough radiation force to blow out grains. For stellar mass loss rates of 10-100x solar, compact (zero porosity) grains can only be removed if they are very small, consistently with previous work, if the porosity is 0.9, then grains approaching 0.1 micron can be removed via corpuscular forces (i.e., the stellar wind).
  • Detached shells are believed to be created during a thermal pulse, and constrain the time scales and physical properties of one of the main drivers of late stellar evolution. We aim at determining the morphology of the detached dust shells around the carbon AGB stars R Scl and V644 Sco, and compare this to observations of the detached gas shells. We observe the polarised, dust-scattered stellar light around these stars using the PolCor instrument mounted on the ESO 3.6m telescope. Observations were done with a coronographic mask to block out the direct stellar light. The polarised images clearly show the detached shells. Using a dust radiative transfer code to model the dust-scattered polarised light, we constrain the radii and widths of the shells to 19.5 arcsec and 9.4 arcsec for the detached dust shells around R Scl and V644 Sco, respectively. Both shells have an overall spherical symmetry and widths of approx. 2 arcsec. For R Scl we can compare the observed dust emission directly with high spatial-resolution maps of CO(3-2) emission from the shell observed with ALMA. We find that the dust and gas coincide almost exactly, indicating a common evolution. The data presented here for R Scl are the most detailed observations of the entire dusty detached shell to date. For V644 Sco these are the first direct measurements of the detached shell. Also here we find that the dust most likely coincides with the gas shell. The observations are consistent with a scenario where the detached shells are created during a thermal pulse. The determined radii and widths will constrain hydrodynamical models describing the pre-pulse mass loss, the thermal pulse, and post-pulse evolution of the star.
  • Herbig Ae/Be objects, like their lower mass counterparts T Tauri stars, are seen to form a stable circumstellar disk which is initially gas-rich and could ultimately form a planetary system. We present Herschel SPIRE 460-1540 GHz spectra of five targets out of a sample of 13 young disk sources, showing line detections mainly due to warm CO gas.
  • PoGOLite is a hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-100 keV energy band. The instrument design is optimised for the observation of compact astrophysical sources. Observations are conducted from a stabilised stratospheric balloon platform at an altitude of approximately 40 km. The primary targets for first balloon flights of a reduced effective area instrument are the Crab and Cygnus-X1. The polarisation of incoming photons is determined using coincident Compton scattering and photo-absorption events reconstructed in an array of plastic scintillator detector cells surrounded by a bismuth germanate oxide (BGO) side anticoincidence shield and a polyethylene neutron shield. A custom attitude control system keeps the polarimeter field-of-view aligned to targets of interest, compensating for sidereal motion and perturbations such as torsional forces in the balloon rigging. An overview of the PoGOLite project is presented and the outcome of the ill-fated maiden balloon flight is discussed.
  • We observed a test globule, B 335 in U, B, g, r, and I, and together with the 2MASS survey, this data set gives a well-defined spectral energy distribution (SED) of a large number of stars. The SED of each star depends on the interstellar extinction, the distance to the star, and its intrinsic SED. The method is based on the use of stellar atmospheric models to represent the intrinsic SEDs of the stars. Formally, it is then possible to determine the spectral class of each star and thereby its distance. For some of the stars we have optical spectra, allowing us to compare the photometric classification to the spectrometric. We can identify one star at the front side of the globule. It has a photometric distance of 90 pc. The closest star behind the B 335 globule has a distance of only \approx 120 pc and we therefore determine the distance to B 335 as 90-120 pc. Our deep U image shows a relatively bright south-western rim of the globule, and we investigate whether it might be due to a local enhancement of the radiation field. A candidate source, located 1.5 arcminutes outside our field, would be the field star, HD 184982. This star has an entry in the Hipparcos Catalogue and its distance is 140-200 pc. However, we come to the conclusion that the bright SW rim is more likely due to the wing of the point-spread-function (PSF) of this star.
  • We determine the extinction curve from the UV to the near-IR for molecular clouds and investigate whether current models can adequately explain this wavelength dependence of the extinction. The aim is also to interpret the extinction in terms of H2 column density. We applied five different methods, including a new method for simultaneously determining the reddening law and the classification of the background stars. Our method is based on multicolour observations and a grid of model atmospheres. We confirm that the extinction law can be adequately described by a single parameter, RV (the selective to absolute extinction), in accordance with earlier findings. The RV value for B 335 is RV = 4.8. The reddening curve can be accurately reproduced by model calculations. By assuming that all the silicon is bound in silicate grains, we can interpret the reddening in terms of column density, NH = 4.4 (\pm0.5) \times 1021 EI-Ks cm-2, corresponding to NH = 2.3 (\pm0.2) \times 1021 \cdot AV cm-2, close to that of the diffuse ISM, (1.8-2.2) \times 1021 cm-2 . We show that the density of the B 335 globule outer shells can be modelled as an evolved Ebert-Bonnor gas sphere with {\rho} \propto r-2, and estimate the mass of this globule to 2.5 Msun
  • The purpose of the investigation is to probe the dust properties inside a molecular cloud, how particle grow and how the presence of ice coatings may change the overall shape of the extinction curve. Field stars can be used to probe the cloud extinction. By combining multi-colour photometry and IR spectroscopy the spectral class of the star can be determined as can the extinction curve. We determine the reddening curve from 0.35 to 24 \mu m. The water ice band at 3.1 \mu m is weaker (\tau(3.1) = 0.4) than expected from the cloud extinction (AV \approx 10 for the sightline to the most obscured star). On the other hand, the CO ice band at 4.7 \mu m is strong (\tau(4.67) = 0.7) and indicates, that the mass column density of frozen CO is about the same as that of water ice. We show that the reddening curves for the two background stars, for which the silicate band has been measured, can be accurately modelled from the UV to 24 \mu m. These models only include graphite and silicate grains. No need for any additional major grain component to explain the slow decline of the reddening curve beyond the K band. The dust model for the dense part of the cloud has more large grains than for the rim. We propose that the well established shallow reddening curve beyond the K band has two different explanations: larger graphite grains in dense regions and relatively small grains in the diffuse ISM, giving rise to substantially less extinction beyond the K band than previously thought. For the sight line towards the most obscured star, we derive the relation AKs = 0.97 \cdot E(J - Ks), and assuming that all silicon is bound in silicates, N(2 H2 +H) \approx 1.5 \times 10^{21} \cdot AV \approx 9 \times 10^{21} \cdot AKs. For the rim of the cloud we get AKs = 0.51 \cdot E(J - Ks), which is close to recent determinations for the diffuse ISM. The corresponding gas column density is N(2 H2 +H) \approx 2.3 \times 10^{21} \cdot AV \approx 3 \times 10^{22} \cdot AKs.
  • We have used VLT/UVES to spatially resolve the gas disk of beta Pictoris. 88 extended emission lines are observed, with the brightest coming from Fe I, Na I and Ca II. The extent of the gas disk is much larger than previously anticipated; we trace Na I radially from 13 AU out to 323 AU and Ca II to heights of 77 AU above the disk plane, both to the limits of our observations. The degree of flaring is significantly larger for the gas disk than the dust disk. A strong NE/SW brightness asymmetry is observed, with the SW emission being abruptly truncated at 150-200 AU. The inner gas disk is tilted about 5 degrees with respect to the outer disk, similar to the appearance of the disk in light scattered from dust. We show that most, perhaps all, of the Na I column density seen in the 'stable' component of absorption, comes from the extended disk. Finally, we discuss the effects of radiation pressure in the extended gas disk and show that the assumption of hydrogen, in whatever form, as a braking agent is inconsistent with observations.
  • We present high resolution Na I D spectroscopy of the beta Pic disk, and the resonantly scattered sodium emission can be traced from less than 30 AU to at least 140 AU from the central star. This atomic gas is co-existent with the dust particles, suggestive of a common origin or source. The disk rotates towards us in the south-west and away from us in the north-east. The velocity pattern of the gas finally provides direct evidence that the faint linear feature seen in images of the star is a circumstellar disk in Keplerian rotation. From modelling the spatial distribution of the Na I line profiles we determine the effective dynamical mass to be 1.40 +/- 0.05 M_sun, which is smaller than the stellar mass, 1.75 M_sun. We ascribe this difference to the gravity opposing radiation pressure in the Na I lines. We argue that this is consistent with the fact that Na is nearly completely ionised throughout the disk (Na I/Na < 10^-4). The total column density of sodium gas is N(Na) = 10^15 cm^-2.