• We conducted a multi-wavelength six-month campaign to observe the Seyfert galaxy NGC~7469, using the space-based observatories \textit{HST}, \textit{Swift}, \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR}. Here we report the results of the spectral analysis of the 7 simultaneous \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR} observations. The sources shows significant flux variability within each observation, but the average flux is less variable among the different pointings of our campaign. Our spectral analysis reveals a prominent narrow neutral \ion{Fe} K$\alpha$ emission line in all the spectra, with weaker contributions from Fe K$\beta$, neutral Ni K$\alpha$ and ionised iron. We find no evidence for variability or relativistic effects acting on the emission lines, which indicates that they originate from distant material. Analysing jointly \textit{XMM-Newton} and \textit{NuSTAR} data a constant photon index is found ($\Gamma$=$1.78\pm0.02$), together with a high energy cut-off $E_{\rm{cut}}=170^{+60}_{-40}$ keV. Adopting a self-consistent Comptonization model, these values correspond to an average coronal electron temperature of kT=$45^{+15}_{-12}$ keV and, assuming a spherical geometry, an optical depth $\tau=2.6\pm0.9$. The reflection component is consistent with being constant, with a reflection fraction in the range $R=0.3-0.6$. A prominent soft excess dominates the spectra below 4 keV. This is best fit with a second Comptonization component, arising from a \virg{warm corona} with an average $kT=0.67\pm0.03$ keV and a corresponding optical depth $\tau=9.2\pm0.2$.
  • The X-ray narrow emission line region (NELR) of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC\,5548 has been interpreted as a single-phase photoionized plasma that is absorbed by some of the warm absorber components. This scenario requires those overlaying warm absorber components to have larger distance (to the central engine) than the X-ray NELR, which is not fully consistent with the distance estimates found in the literature. Therefore, we reanalyze the high-resolution spectra obtained in 2013--2014 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) aboard \textit{XMM}-Newton to provide an alternative interpretation of the X-ray narrow emission features. We find that the X-ray narrow emission features in NGC\,5548 can be described by a two-phase photoionized plasma with different ionization parameters ($\log \xi=1.3$ and $0.1$) and kinematics ($v_{\rm out}=-50$ and $-400~{\rm km~s^{-1}}$), and no further absorption by the warm absorber components. The X-ray and optical NELR might be the same multi-phase photoionized plasma. Both X-ray and optical NELR have comparable distances, asymmetric line profiles, and the underlying photoionized plasma is turbulent and compact in size. The X-ray NELR is not the counterpart of the UV/X-ray absorber outside the line of sight because their distances and kinematics are not consistent. In addition, X-ray broad emission features that we find in the spectrum can be accounted for by a third photoionized emission component. The RGS spectrum obtained in 2016 is analyzed as well, where the luminosity of most prominent emission lines (the \ion{O}{vii} forbidden line and \ion{O}{viii} Ly$\alpha$ line) are the same (at a 1 $\sigma$ confidence level) as in 2013--2014.
  • We investigate the ionic column density variability of the ionized outflows associated with NGC$\sim$7469, to estimate their location and power. This could allow a better understanding of galactic feedback of AGNs to their host galaxies. Analysis of seven XMM-Newton grating observations from 2015 is reported. We use an individual-ion spectral fitting approach, and compare different epochs to accurately determine variability on time-scales of years, months, and days. We find no significant column density variability in a 10 year period implying that the outflow is far from the ionizing source. The implied lower bound on the ionization equilibrium time, 10 years, constrains the lower limit on the distance to be at least 12 pc, and up to 31 pc, much less but consistent with the 1 kpc wide starburst ring. The ionization distribution of column density is reconstructed from measured column densities, nicely matching results of two 2004 observations, with one large high ionization parameter ($\xi$) component at $2<\log \xi<3.5$, and one at $0.5<\log \xi<1$ in cgs units. The strong dependence of the expression for kinetic power, $\propto1/\xi$, hampers tight constraints on the feedback mechanism of outflows with a large range in ionization parameter, which is often observed and indicates a non-conical outflow. The kinetic power of the outflow is estimated here to be within 0.4 and 60 \% of the Eddington luminosity, depending on the ion used to estimate $\xi$.
  • L. Pei, M. M. Fausnaugh, A. J. Barth, B. M. Peterson, M. C. Bentz, G. De Rosa, K. D. Denney, M. R. Goad, C. S. Kochanek, K. T. Korista, G. A. Kriss, R. W. Pogge, V. N. Bennert, M. Brotherton, K. I. Clubb, E. Dalla Bontà, A. V. Filippenko, J. E. Greene, C. J. Grier, M. Vestergaard, W. Zheng, Scott M. Adams, Thomas G. Beatty, A. Bigley, Jacob E. Brown, Jonathan S. Brown, G. Canalizo, J. M. Comerford, Carl T. Coker, E. M. Corsini, S. Croft, K. V. Croxall, A. J. Deason, Michael Eracleous, O. D. Fox, E. L. Gates, C. B. Henderson, E. Holmbeck, T. W.-S. Holoien, J. J. Jensen, C. A. Johnson, P. L. Kelly, S. Kim, A. King, M. W. Lau, Miao Li, Cassandra Lochhaas, Zhiyuan Ma, E. R. Manne-Nicholas, J. C. Mauerhan, M. A. Malkan, R. McGurk, L. Morelli, Ana Mosquera, Dale Mudd, F. Muller Sanchez, M. L. Nguyen, P. Ochner, B. Ou-Yang, A. Pancoast, Matthew T. Penny, A. Pizzella, Radosław Poleski, Jessie Runnoe, B. Scott, Jaderson S. Schimoia, B. J. Shappee, I. Shivvers, Gregory V. Simonian, A. Siviero, Garrett Somers, Daniel J. Stevens, M. A. Strauss, Jamie Tayar, N. Tejos, T. Treu, J. Van Saders, L. Vican, S. Villanueva Jr., H. Yuk, N. L. Zakamska, W. Zhu, M. D. Anderson, P. Arévalo, C. Bazhaw, S. Bisogni, G. A. Borman, M. C. Bottorff, W. N. Brandt, A. A. Breeveld, E. M. Cackett, M. T. Carini, D. M. Crenshaw, A. De Lorenzo-Cáceres, M. Dietrich, R. Edelson, N. V. Efimova, J. Ely, P. A. Evans, G. J. Ferland, K. Flatland, N. Gehrels, S. Geier, J. M. Gelbord, D. Grupe, A. Gupta, P. B. Hall, S. Hicks, D. Horenstein, Keith Horne, T. Hutchison, M. Im, M. D. Joner, J. Jones, J. Kaastra, S. Kaspi, B. C. Kelly, J. A. Kennea, M. Kim, S. C. Kim, S. A. Klimanov, J. C. Lee, D. C. Leonard, P. Lira, F. MacInnis, S. Mathur, I. M. McHardy, C. Montouri, R. Musso, S. V. Nazarov, H. Netzer, R. P. Norris, J. A. Nousek, D. N. Okhmat, I. Papadakis, J. R. Parks, J.-U. Pott, S. E. Rafter, H.-W. Rix, D. A. Saylor, K. Schnülle, S. G. Sergeev, M. Siegel, A. Skielboe, M. Spencer, D. Starkey, H.-I. Sung, K. G. Teems, C. S. Turner, P. Uttley, C. Villforth, Y. Weiss, J.-H. Woo, H. Yan, S. Young, Y. Zu
    Feb. 3, 2017 astro-ph.GA
    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic monitoring program targeting NGC 5548 as part of a larger multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The campaign spanned six months and achieved an almost daily cadence with observations from five ground-based telescopes. The H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 broad emission-line light curves lag that of the 5100 $\AA$ optical continuum by $4.17^{+0.36}_{-0.36}$ days and $0.79^{+0.35}_{-0.34}$ days, respectively. The H$\beta$ lag relative to the 1158 $\AA$ ultraviolet continuum light curve measured by the Hubble Space Telescope is roughly $\sim$50% longer than that measured against the optical continuum, and the lag difference is consistent with the observed lag between the optical and ultraviolet continua. This suggests that the characteristic radius of the broad-line region is $\sim$50% larger than the value inferred from optical data alone. We also measured velocity-resolved emission-line lags for H$\beta$ and found a complex velocity-lag structure with shorter lags in the line wings, indicative of a broad-line region dominated by Keplerian motion. The responses of both the H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 emission lines to the driving continuum changed significantly halfway through the campaign, a phenomenon also observed for C IV, Ly $\alpha$, He II(+O III]), and Si IV(+O IV]) during the same monitoring period. Finally, given the optical luminosity of NGC 5548 during our campaign, the measured H$\beta$ lag is a factor of five shorter than the expected value implied by the $R_\mathrm{BLR} - L_\mathrm{AGN}$ relation based on the past behavior of NGC 5548.
  • We conduct a multiwavelength continuum variability study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 to investigate the temperature structure of its accretion disk. The 19 overlapping continuum light curves (1158 to 9157 angstroms) combine simultaneous HST , Swift , and ground-based observations over a 180 day period from 2014 January to July. Light-curve variability is interpreted as the reverberation response of the accretion disk to irradiation by a central time-varying point source. Our model yields the disk inclination, i, temperature T1 at 1 light day from the black hole, and a temperature-radius slope, alpha. We also infer the driving light curve and find that it correlates poorly with both the hard and soft X-ray light curves, suggesting that the X-rays alone may not drive the ultraviolet and optical variability over the observing period. We also decompose the light curves into bright, faint, and mean accretion-disk spectra. These spectra lie below that expected for a standard blackbody accretion disk accreting at L/LEdd = 0.1
  • We present ground-based optical photometric monitoring data for NGC 5548, part of an extended multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The light curves have nearly daily cadence from 2014 January to July in nine filters (\emph{BVRI} and \emph{ugriz}). Combined with ultraviolet data from the \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} and \emph{Swift}, we confirm significant time delays between the continuum bands as a function of wavelength, extending the wavelength coverage from 1158\,\AA\ to the $z$ band ($\sim\!9160$\,\AA). We find that the lags at wavelengths longer than the {\it V} band are equal to or greater than the lags of high-ionization-state emission lines (such as He\,{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 1640$ and $\lambda 4686$), suggesting that the continuum-emitting source is of a physical size comparable to the inner broad-line region (BLR). The trend of lag with wavelength is broadly consistent with the prediction for continuum reprocessing by an accretion disk with $\tau \propto \lambda^{4/3}$. However, the lags also imply a disk radius that is 3 times larger than the prediction from standard thin-disk theory, assuming that the bolometric luminosity is 10\% of the Eddington luminosity ($L = 0.1L_{\rm Edd}$). Using optical spectra from the Large Binocular Telescope, we estimate the bias of the interband continuum lags due to BLR emission observed in the filters. We find that the bias for filters with high levels of BLR contamination ($\sim\! 20\%$) can be important for the shortest continuum lags, and likely has a significant impact on the {\it u} and {\it U} bands owing to Balmer continuum emission.
  • (Abridged) The archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 was observed in 2013-2014 in the context of an extensive multiwavelength campaign, which revealed the source to be in an extraordinary state of persistent heavy obscuration. We re-analyzed the archival grating spectra obtained by XMM-Newton and Chandra between 1999 and 2007 in order to characterize the classic warm absorber (WA) using consistent models and up-to-date photoionization codes and atomic physics databases and to construct a baseline model that can be used as a template for the WA in the 2013 observations. The WA in NGC 5548 is composed of 6 distinct ionization phases outflowing in 4 kinematic regimes in the form of a stratified wind with several layers intersected by our line of sight. If the changes in the WA are solely due to ionization or recombination processes in response to variations in the ionizing flux among the different observations, we are able to estimate lower limits on the density of the WA, finding that the farthest components are less dense and have a lower ionization. These limits are used to put stringent upper limits on the distance of the WA components from the central ionizing source, with the lowest ionization phases <50, <20, and <5 pc, respectively, while the intermediately ionized components lie at <3.6 and <2.2 pc from the center, respectively. The highest ionization component is located at ~0.6 pc or closer to the AGN central engine. The mass outflow rate summed over all WA components is ~0.3 Msun/yr, about six times the nominal accretion rate of the source. The total kinetic luminosity injected into the ISM is a small fraction (~0.03%) of the bolometric luminosity of the source. After adding the contribution of the UV absorbers, this value augments to ~0.2% of the bolometric luminosity, well below the minimum amount of energy required by current feedback models to regulate galaxy evolution.
  • The proximity profile in the spectra of z~3 quasars, where fluxes extend blueward of the He II Lya wavelength 304 (1+z) A, is one of the most important spectral features in the study of the intergalactic medium. Based on the HST spectra of 24 He II quasars, we find that the majority of them display a proximity profile, corresponding to an ionization radius as large as 20 Mpc in the source's rest frame. In comparison with those in the H i spectra of the quasars at z~6, the He II proximity effect is more prominent and is observed over a considerably longer period of reionization. The He II proximity zone sizes decrease at higher redshifts, particularly at z > 3.3. This trend is similar to that for H I, signaling an onset of He II reionization at z~4. For quasar SDSS1253+6817 (z=3.48), the He II absorption trough displays a gradual decline and serves a good case for modeling the He II reionization. To model such a broad profile requires a quasar radiation field whose distribution between 4 and 1 Rydberg is considerably harder than normally assumed. The UV continuum of this quasar is indeed exceptionally steep, and the He II ionization level in the quasar vicinity is higher than the average level in the intergalactic medium. These results are evidence that a very hard EUV continuum from this quasar produces a large ionized zone around it. Distinct exceptions are the two brightest He II quasars at z~2.8, for which no significant proximity profile is present, possibly implying that they are young.
  • We describe the first results from a six-month long reverberation-mapping experiment in the ultraviolet based on 170 observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. Significant correlated variability is found in the continuum and broad emission lines, with amplitudes ranging from ~30% to a factor of two in the emission lines and a factor of three in the continuum. The variations of all the strong emission lines lag behind those of the continuum, with He II 1640 lagging behind the continuum by ~2.5 days and Lyman alpha 1215, C IV 1550, and Si IV 1400 lagging by ~5-6 days. The relationship between the continuum and emission lines is complex. In particular, during the second half of the campaign, all emission-line lags increased by a factor of 1.3-2 and differences appear in the detailed structure of the continuum and emission-line light curves. Velocity-resolved cross-correlation analysis shows coherent structure in lag versus line-of-sight velocity for the emission lines; the high-velocity wings of C IV respond to continuum variations more rapidly than the line core, probably indicating higher velocity BLR clouds at smaller distances from the central engine. The velocity-dependent response of Lyman alpha, however, is more complex and will require further analysis.
  • Recent intensive Swift monitoring of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 yielded 282 usable epochs over 125 days across six UV/optical bands and the X-rays. This is the densest extended AGN UV/optical continuum sampling ever obtained, with a mean sampling rate <0.5 day. Approximately daily HST UV sampling was also obtained. The UV/optical light curves show strong correlations (r_max = 0.57 - 0.90) and the clearest measurement to date of interband lags. These lags are well-fit by a \tau propto \lambda^4/3 wavelength dependence, with a normalization that indicates an unexpectedly large disk radius of 0.35 +/- 0.05 lt-day at 1367 A, assuming a simple face-on model. The U-band shows a marginally larger lag than expected from the fit and surrounding bands, which could be due to Balmer continuum emission from the broad-line region as suggested by Korista and Goad. The UV/X-ray correlation is weaker (r_max < 0.45) and less consistent over time. This indicates that while Swift is beginning to measure UV/optical lags in general agreement with accretion disk theory (although the derived size is larger than predicted), the relationship with X-ray variability is less well understood. Combining this accretion disk size estimate with those from quasar microlensing studies suggests that AGN disk sizes scale approximately linearly with central black hole mass over a wide range of masses.
  • We describe the analysis of the seven broad-band X-ray continuum observations of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 that were obtained with XMM-Newton or Chandra, simultaneously with high-energy (> 10 keV) observations with NuSTAR and INTEGRAL. These data were obtained as part of a multiwavelength campaign undertaken from the summer of 2013 till early 2014. We find evidence of a high-energy cut-off in at least one observation, which we attribute to thermal Comptonization, and a constant reflected component that is likely due to neutral material at least a few light months away from the continuum source. We confirm the presence of strong, partial covering X-ray absorption as the explanation for the sharp decrease in flux through the soft X-ray band. The obscurers appear to be variable in column density and covering fraction on time scales as short as weeks. A fit of the average spectrum over the range 0.3-400 keV with a realistic Comptonization model indicates the presence of a hot corona with a temperature of 40(+40,-10) keV and an optical depth of 2.7(+0.7,-1.2) if a spherical geometry is assumed.
  • An extensive multi-satellite campaign on NGC 5548 has revealed this archetypal Seyfert-1 galaxy to be in an exceptional state of persistent heavy absorption. Our observations taken in 2013-2014 with XMM-Newton, Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and two ground-based observatories have together enabled us to establish that this unexpected phenomenon is caused by an outflowing stream of weakly ionised gas (called the obscurer), extending from the vicinity of the accretion disk to the broad-line region. In this work we present the details of our campaign and the data obtained by all the observatories. We determine the spectral energy distribution of NGC 5548 from near-infrared to hard X-rays by establishing the contribution of various emission and absorption processes taking place along our line of sight towards the central engine. We thus uncover the intrinsic emission and produce a broadband continuum model for both obscured (average summer 2013 data) and unobscured ($<$ 2011) epochs of NGC 5548. Our results suggest that the intrinsic NIR/optical/UV continuum is a single Comptonised component with its higher energy tail creating the 'soft X-ray excess'. This component is compatible with emission from a warm, optically-thick corona as part of the inner accretion disk. We then investigate the effects of the continuum on the ionisation balance and thermal stability of photoionised gas for unobscured and obscured epochs.
  • We present a new method to model a HST/COS spectrum, aimed to analyze intrinsic UV absorption from the outflow of Mrk 290, a Seyfert I galaxy. We use newly updated XSTAR to generate photoionization models for the intrinsic absorption from the AGN outflow, the line emission from the AGN broad and narrow line regions, and the local absorption from high velocity clouds and Galactic interstellar medium. The combination of these physical models accurately fit the COS spectrum. Three intrinsic absorbers outflowing with velocities ~500 km/s are identified, two of which are found directly from two velocity components of the N V and C IV doublets, while the third is required by the extra absorption in the Lyman alpha. Their outflow velocities, ionization states and column densities are consistent with the lowest and moderately ionization warm absorbers (WAs) in the X-ray domain found by Chandra observations, suggesting an one-to-one correspondence between the absorbing gas in the UV and X-ray bands. The small turbulent velocities of the WAs (v_turb~<100 km/s) support our previous argument from the X-ray study that the absorbers originate from the inner side of the torus due to thermal evaporation. Given the covering fractions of ~65% for the three WAs, we deduce that the lengths and the thicknesses of the WAs are comparable, which indicates that the geometry of WAs are more likely clouds rather than flat and thin layers. In addition, the modeling of the broad line emission suggests a higher covering fraction of clouds when they are very closer to the black hole.
  • We present the results of a recent (March 2011) 160 ks Chandra-LETGS observation of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4593, and the analysis of archival X-ray and UV spectra taken with XMM-Newton and HST/STIS in 2002. We find evidence of a multi-component warm absorber (WA) in the X-rays with four distinct ionisation degrees (log xi = 1.0, log xi = 1.7, log xi = 2.4, and log xi = 3.0) outflowing at several hundreds of km/s. In the UV we detect 15 kinematic components in the absorbers, blueshifted with respect to the systemic velocity of the source, ranging from -60 km/s to -1520 km/s. Although the predicted CIV and NV column densities from the low-ionisation X-ray outflow are in agreement with those measured for some components in the STIS spectrum, there are kinematic discrepancies that may prevent both the X-ray and UV absorbers from originating in the same intervening gas. We derive upper limits on the location of the absorbers finding that the high-ionisation gas lie within ~6 - 29 pc from the central ionising source, while the low-ionisation gas is located at several hundreds of pc. This is consistent with our line of sight passing through different parts of a stratified wind. The total kinetic energy of the outflows injected into the surroundings of the host galaxy only accounts for a tiny fraction of the bolometric luminosity of the source, and it is therefore unlikely that they may cause a significant impact in the interstellar medium of NGC 4593 in a given single episode of activity.
  • (Abridged) The simultaneous UV to X-rays/gamma rays data obtained during the multi-wavelength XMM/INTEGRAL campaign on the Seyfert 1 Mrk 509 are used in this paper and tested against physically motivated broad band models. Each observation has been fitted with a realistic thermal comptonisation model for the continuum emission. Prompted by the correlation between the UV and soft X-ray flux, we use a thermal comptonisation component for the soft X-ray excess. The UV to X-rays/gamma-rays emission of Mrk 509 can be well fitted by these components. The presence of a relatively hard high-energy spectrum points to the existence of a hot (kT~100 keV), optically-thin (tau~0.5) corona producing the primary continuum. On the contrary, the soft X-ray component requires a warm (kT~1 keV), optically-thick (tau~15) plasma. Estimates of the amplification ratio for this warm plasma support a configuration close to the "theoretical" configuration of a slab corona above a passive disk. An interesting consequence is the weak luminosity-dependence of its emission, a possible explanation of the roughly constant spectral shape of the soft X-ray excess seen in AGNs. The temperature (~ 3 eV) and flux of the soft-photon field entering and cooling the warm plasma suggests that it covers the accretion disk down to a transition radius $R_{tr}$ of 10-20 $R_g$. This plasma could be the warm upper layer of the accretion disk. On the contrary the hot corona has a more photon-starved geometry. The high temperature ($\sim$ 100 eV) of the soft-photon field entering and cooling it favors a localization of the hot corona in the inner flow. This soft-photon field could be part of the comptonised emission produced by the warm plasma. In this framework, the change in the geometry (i.e. $R_{tr}$) could explain most of the observed flux and spectral variability.
  • Active Galactic Nuclei often show evidence of photoionized outflows. A major uncertainty in models for these outflows is the distance ($R$) to the gas from the central black hole. In this paper we use the HST/COS data from a massive multi-wavelength monitoring campaign on the bright Seyfert I galaxy Mrk 509, in combination with archival HST/STIS data, to constrain the location of the various kinematic components of the outflow. We compare the expected response of the photoionized gas to changes in ionizing flux with the changes measured in the data using the following steps: 1) We compare the column densities of each kinematic component measured in the 2001 STIS data with those measured in the 2009 COS data; 2) We use time-dependent photionization calculations with a set of simulated lightcurves to put statistical upper limits on the hydrogen number density that are consistent with the observed small changes in the ionic column densities; 3) From the upper limit on the number density, we calculate a lower limit on the distance to the absorber from the central source via the prior determination of the ionization parameter. Our method offers two improvements on traditional timescale analysis. First, we account for the physical behavior of AGN lightcurves. Second, our analysis accounts for the quality of measurement in cases where no changes are observed in the absorption troughs. The very small variations in trough ionic column densities (mostly consistent with no change) between the 2001 and 2009 epochs allow us to put statistical lower limits on the distance between 100--200 pc for all the major UV absorption components at a confidence level of 99%. These results are mainly consistent with the independent distance estimates derived for the warm absorbers from the simultaneous X-ray spectra.
  • The diffuse gas in and nearby the Milky Way plays an important role in the evolution of the entire Galaxy. It has a complex structure characterized by neutral, weakly and highly ionized gas, dust, and molecules. We probe this gas through the observation of its absorption lines in the high-energy spectra of background sources. We use high-quality spectra of AGN Mrk 509, located at high Galactic latitudes obtained with XMM-Newton, HST and FUSE. We use advanced absorption models consisting of photo- and collisional-ionization. We constrain the column density ratios of the different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) and measure the abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, and Fe. We detect seven discrete interstellar clouds with different velocities. One is a typical low-velocity cloud (LVC) and three belong to the family of the intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) found near the Galactic disk. These four clouds show large deviation from Solar abundances in the gas phase, mostly caused by dust depletion. The other three clouds are ionized high-velocity clouds (HVCs) and are located either in the Galactic environment or in the Local Group halo as suggested by the signatures of collisional ionization. The similar abundances and ionization structure of the HVCs suggest a common location and origin: they might belong to the remainder of an extragalactic cloud which was captured by the Galaxy. We have shown that combined UV / X-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the ISM. In common Galactic clouds, like LVCs and IVCs, the ISM shows a complex structure consisting of at least three different temperature phases.
  • The bright Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 509 was monitored by XMM-Newton and other satellites in 2009 to constrain the location of the outflow. We have studied the response of the photoionised gas to changes in the ionising flux produced by the central regions. We used the 5 discrete ionisation components A-E detected in the time-averaged spectrum taken with the RGS. Using the ratio of fluxed EPIC and RGS spectra, we put tight constraints on the variability of the absorbers. Monitoring with the Swift satellite started 6 weeks before the XMM-Newton observations, allowing to use the ionising flux history and to develop a model for the time-dependent photoionisation. Components A and B are too weak for variability studies, but the distance for component A is known from optical imaging of the [O III] line to be ~3 kpc. During the 5 weeks of the XMM-Newton observations we found no evidence of changes in the 3 X-ray dominant ionisation components C-E, despite a huge soft X-ray intensity increase of 60% in the middle of our campaign. This excludes high-density gas close to the black hole. Instead, using our time-dependent modelling, we find low density and derive firm lower limits to the distance of these components. Component D shows evidence for variability on longer time scales, yielding an upper limit to the distance. For component E we derive an upper limit to the distance based on the argument that the thickness of the absorbing layer must be less than its distance to the black hole. Combining these results, at the 90% confidence level, component C has a distance of >70 pc, component D between 5-33 pc, and component E >5 pc but smaller than 21-400 pc, depending upon modelling details. These results are consistent with the upper limits from the HST/COS observations of our campaign and point to an origin of the dominant, slow (v<1000 km/s) outflow components in the NLR or torus-region of Mrk 509.
  • We observed Mrk 509 during the fall of 2009 during a multiwavelength campaign using XMM-Newton, Chandra, HST/COS, SWIFT, and Integral. The 600-ks XMM/RGS spectrum finds two kinematic components and a discrete distribution of ionized absorbers. Our high S/N COS spectrum detects additional complexity in the known UV absorption troughs from a variety of sources in Mrk 509, including the outflow from the active nucleus, the ISM and halo of the host galaxy, and infalling clouds or stripped gas from a merger that are illuminated by the AGN. The UV absorption only partially covers the emission from the AGN nucleus with covering fractions lower than those previously seen with STIS, and are comparable to those seen with FUSE. Given the larger apertures of COS and FUSE compared to STIS, we favor scattered light from an extended region near the AGN as the explanation for the partial covering. As observed in prior X-ray and UV spectra, the UV absorption has velocities comparable to the X-ray absorption, but the bulk of the ultraviolet absorption is in a lower ionization state with lower total column density than the gas responsible for the X-ray absorption. Variability compared to prior UV spectra lets us set limits on the location, density, mass flux, and kinetic energy of the outflowing gas. For component 1 at $-400 \rm km s^{-1}$, the kinetic energy flux of both the UV and the X-ray outflow is insufficient to have a significant impact on further evolution of the host galaxy.
  • Context. The study of abundances in the nucleus of active galaxies allows us to investigate the evolution of abundance by comparing local and higher redshift galaxies. However, the methods used so far have substantial drawbacks or rather large uncertainties. Some of the measurements are at odds with the initial mass function derived from the older stellar population of local elliptical galaxies. Aims. We determine accurate and reliable abundances of C, N, Ne, and Fe relative to O from the narrow absorption lines observed in the X-ray spectra of Mrk 509. Methods. We use the stacked 600 ks XMM-Newton RGS and 180 ks Chandra LETGS spectra. Thanks to simultaneous observations with INTEGRAL and the optical monitor on-board XMM-Newton for the RGS observations and HST-COS and Swift for the LETGS observations, we have an individual spectral energy distribution for each dataset. Owing to the excellent quality of the RGS spectrum, the ionisation structure of the absorbing gas is well constrained, allowing for a reliable abundance determination using ions over the whole observed range of ionisation parameters. Results. We find that the relative abundances are consistent with the proto-solar abundance ratios: C/O = 1.19$\pm$0.08, N/O = 0.98$\pm$0.08, Ne/O = 1.11$\pm$0.10, Mg/O = 0.68$\pm$0.16, Si/O = 1.3$\pm$0.6, Ca/O = 0.89$\pm$0.25, and Fe/O = 0.85$\pm$0.06, with the exception of S, which is slightly under-abundant, S/O = 0.57$\pm$0.14. Our results, and their implications, are discussed and compared to the results obtained using other techniques to derive abundances in galaxies.
  • (Abridged) Active galactic nuclei show a wealth of interesting physical processes, some of which are poorly understood. We want to address a number of open questions, including the location and physics of the outflow from AGN, the nature of the continuum emission, the geometry and physical state of the X-ray broad emission line region, the Fe-K line complex, the metal abundances of the nucleus and finally the interstellar medium of our own Galaxy. We study one of the best targets for these aims, the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 509 with a multiwavelength campaign using five satellites (XMM-Newton, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and Swift) and two ground-based facilities (WHT and PAIRITEL). Our observations cover more than five decades in frequency, from 2 um to 200 keV. The combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and time variability allows us to disentangle and study the different components. Our campaign covers 100 days from September to December 2009, and is centred on a simultaneous set of deep XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL observations with regular time intervals, spanning seven weeks. We obtain a continuous light curve in the X-ray and UV band, showing a strong, up to 60% flux increase in the soft X-ray band during the three weeks in the middle of our deepest monitoring campaign, and which is correlated with an enhancement of the UV flux. This allows us to study the time evolution of the continuum and the outflow. By stacking the observations, we have also obtained one of the best X-ray and UV spectra of a Seyfert galaxy ever obtained. In this paper we also study the effects of the spectral energy distribution (SED) that we obtained on the photo-ionisation equilibrium. Thanks to our broad-band coverage, uncertainties on the SED do not strongly affect the determination of this equilibrium.
  • We study the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk~509 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) of XMM-Newton using the RGS multi-pointing mode of XMM-Newton for the first time in order to constrain the properties of the outflow in this object. We want to obtain the most accurate spectral properties from the 600 ks spectrum of Mrk 509 which has excellent statistical quality. We derive an accurate relative calibration for the effective area of the RGS, derive an accurate absolute wavelength calibration, improve the method for adding time-dependent spectra and enhance the efficiency of the spectral fitting by two orders of magnitude. We show the major improvement of the spectral data quality due to the use of the new RGS multi-pointing mode of XMM-Newton. We illustrate the gain in accuracy by showing that with the improved wavelength calibration the two velocity troughs observed in UV spectra are resolved.
  • We present the results of our 600 ks RGS observation as part of the multiwavelength campaign on Mrk 509. The very high quality of the spectrum allows us to investigate the ionized outflow with an unprecedented accuracy due to the long exposure and the use of the RGS multipointing mode. We detect multiple absorption lines from the interstellar medium and from the ionized absorber in Mrk 509. A number of emission components are also detected, including broad emission lines consistent with an origin in the broad line region, the narrow OVII forbidden emission line and also (narrow) radiative recombination continua. The ionized absorber consists of two velocity components (v = -13 \pm 11 km/s and v = -319 \pm 14 km/s), which both are consistent with earlier results, including UV data. There is another tentative component outflowing at high velocity, -770 \pm 109 km/s, which is only seen in a few highly ionized absorption lines. The outflow shows discrete ionization components, spanning four orders of magnitude in ionization parameter. Due to the excellent statistics of our spectrum, we demonstrate for the first time that the outflow in Mrk 509 in the important range of log xi between 1-3 cannot be described by a smooth, continuous absorption measure distribution, but instead shows two strong, discrete peaks. At the highest and lowest ionization parameters we cannot differentiate smooth and discrete components.
  • We present here the results of a 180 ks Chandra-LETGS observation as part of a large multi-wavelength campaign on Mrk 509. We study the warm absorber in Mrk 509 and use the data from a simultaneous HST-COS observation in order to assess whether the gas responsible for the UV and X-ray absorption are the same. We analyzed the LETGS X-ray spectrum of Mrk 509 using the SPEX fitting package. We detect several absorption features originating in the ionized absorber of the source, along with resolved emission lines and radiative recombination continua. The absorption features belong to ions with, at least, three distinct ionization degrees. The lowest ionized component is slightly redshifted (v = +73 km/s) and is not in pressure equilibrium with the others, and therefore it is not likely part of the outflow, possibly belonging to the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. The other components are outflowing at velocities of -196 and -455 km/s, respectively. The source was observed simultaneously with HST-COS, finding 13 UV kinematic components. At least three of them can be kinematically associated with the observed X-ray components. Based on the HST-COS results and a previous FUSE observation, we find evidence that the UV absorbing gas might be co-located with the X-ray absorbing gas and belong to the same structure.
  • We present medium resolution (R~20,000) HST/COS ultraviolet spectra covering 1155-1760 A of the Seyfert 1 Mrk 509 obtained simultaneously with a Chandra/LETGS spectrum as part of a multiwavelength campaign in 2009 that included observations with XMM-Newton, SWIFT, and Integral. Our high S/N spectrum detects additional complexity in the absorption troughs from a variety of sources in Mrk 509, including the outflow from the active nucleus, the ISM and halo of the host galaxy, and infalling clouds or stripped gas from a merger that are illuminated by the AGN. Variability between the STIS and COS observation of the -400 km/s component allows us to set an upper limit on its distance of < 250 pc. Similarly, variability of a component at +150 km/s between two prior FUSE observations limits its distance to < 1.5 kpc. The UV absorption only partially covers the emission from the AGN nucleus. Covering fractions are lower than those previously seen with STIS, and are comparable to those seen with FUSE. Given the larger apertures of COS and FUSE compared to STIS, we favor scattered light from an extended region near the AGN as the explanation for the partial covering. As observed in prior X-ray and UV spectra, the UV absorption has velocities comparable to the X-ray absorption, but the bulk of the ultraviolet absorption is in a lower ionization state with lower total column density than the gas responsible for the X-ray absorption. We conclude that the outflow from the active nucleus is a multiphase wind.