• Photometric instabilities of $\beta$ Lyr were observed in 2016 by two red-filter BRITE satellites over more than 10 revolutions of the binary, with $\sim$100-minute sampling. Analysis of the time series shows that flares or fading events take place typically 3 to 5 times per binary orbit. The amplitudes of the disturbances (relative to the mean light curve, in units of the maximum out-of-eclipse light-flux, f.u.) are characterized by a Gaussian distribution with $\sigma=0.0130\pm0.0004$ f.u. Most of the disturbances appear to be random, with a tendency to remain for one or a few orbital revolutions, sometimes changing from brightening to fading or the reverse. Phases just preceding the center of the deeper eclipse showed the most scatter while phases around secondary eclipse were the quietest. This implies that the invisible companion is the most likely source of the instabilities. Wavelet transform analysis showed domination of the variability scales at phase intervals $0.05-0.3$ (0.65--4 d), with the shorter (longer) scales dominating in numbers (variability power) in this range. The series can be well described as a stochastic Gaussian process with the signal at short timescales showing a slightly stronger correlation than red noise. The signal de-correlation timescale $\tau=(0.068\pm0.018)$ in phase or $(0.88\pm0.23)$~d appears to follow the same dependence on the accretor mass as that observed for AGN and QSO masses 5--9 orders of magnitude larger than the $\beta$~Lyr torus-hidden component.
  • We report the latest set of spectropolarimetric observations of the magnetic $\beta$ Cep star $\xi^1$ CMa. The new observations confirm the long-period model of Shultz et al.\ (2017), who proposed a rotational period of about 30 years and predicted that in 2018 the star should pass through a magnetic null. In perfect agreement with this projection, all longitudinal magnetic field $\langle B_z \rangle$ measurements are close to 0 G. Remarkably, individual Stokes $V$ profiles all display a crossover signature, which is consistent with $\langle B_z \rangle \sim 0$ but is {\em not} expected when $v\sin{i} \sim 0$. The crossover signatures furthermore exhibit pulsationally modulated amplitude and sign variations. We show that these unexpected phenomena can all be explained by a `radial crossover' effect related to the star's radial pulsations, together with an important deviation of the global field topology from a purely dipolar structure, which we explore via a dipole+quadrupole configuration as the simplest non-dipolar field.
  • The rotational and magnetic properties of many magnetic hot stars are poorly characterized, therefore the MiMeS and BinaMIcS collaborations have collected extensive high-dispersion spectropolarimetric datasets of these targets. We present longitudinal magnetic field measurements $\langle B_{\rm z}\rangle$ for 52 early B-type stars (B5 to B0), with which we attempt to determine their rotational periods $P_{\rm rot}$. Supplemented with high-resolution spectroscopy, low-resolution DAO circular spectropolarimetry, and archival Hipparcos photometry, we determined $P_{\rm rot}$ for 10 stars, leaving only 5 stars for which $P_{\rm rot}$ could not be determined. Rotational ephemerides for 14 stars were refined via comparison of new to historical magnetic measurements. The distribution of $P_{\rm rot}$ is very similar to that observed for the cooler Ap/Bp stars. We also measured $v\sin{i}$ and $v_{\rm mac}$ for all stars. Comparison to non-magnetic stars shows that $v\sin{i}$ is much lower for magnetic stars, an expected consequence of magnetic braking. We also find evidence that $v_{\rm mac}$ is lower for magnetic stars. LSD profiles extracted using single-element masks revealed widespread, systematic discrepancies in $\langle B_{\rm z}\rangle$ between different elements: this effect is apparent only for chemically peculiar stars, suggesting it is a consequence of chemical spots. Sinusoidal fits to H line $\langle B_{\rm z}\rangle$ measurements (which should be minimally affected by chemical spots), yielded evidence of surface magnetic fields more complex than simple dipoles in 6 stars for which this has not previously been reported; however, in all 6 cases the second- and third-order amplitudes are small relative to the first-order (dipolar) amplitudes.
  • HD 156324 is an SB3 (B2V/B5V/B5V) system in the Sco OB4 association. The He-strong primary possesses both a strong magnetic field, and H$\alpha$ emission believed to originate in its Centrifugal Magnetosphere (CM). We analyse a large spectroscopic and high-resolution spectropolarimetric dataset. The radial velocities (RVs) indicate that the system is composed of two sub-systems, which we designate A and B. Period analysis of the RVs of the three components yields orbital periods $P_{\rm orb} = 1.5806(1)$~d for the Aa and Ab components, and 6.67(2)~d for the B component, a PGa star. Period analysis of the longitudinal magnetic field \bz~and H$\alpha$ equivalent widths, which should both be sensitive to the rotational period $P_{\rm rot}$ of the magnetic Aa component, both yield $\sim$1.58~d. Since $P_{\rm orb} = P_{\rm rot}$ Aa and Ab must be tidally locked. Consistent with this, the orbit is circularized, and the rotational and orbital inclinations are identical within uncertainty, as are the semi-major axis and the Kepler corotation radius. The star's H$\alpha$ emission morphology differs markedly from both theoretical and observational expectations in that there is only one, rather than two, emission peaks. We propose that this unusual morphology may be a consequence of modification of the gravitocentrifugal potential by the presence of the close stellar companion. We also obtain upper limits on the magnetic dipole strength $B_{\rm d}$ for the Ab and B components, respectively finding $B_{\rm d} < 2.6$~kG and $<0.7$~kG.
  • Previous studies of the chemically peculiar Bp star 36 Lyn revealed a moderately strong magnetic field, circumstellar material, and inhomogeneous surface abundance distributions of certain elements. We present in this paper an analysis of 33 high-signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution Stokes IV observations of 36 Lyn obtained with the Narval spectropolarimeter at the Bernard Lyot telescope at Pic du Midi Observatory. From these data, we compute new measurements of the mean longitudinal magnetic field, Bl, using the multi-line least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique. A rotationally phased Bl curve reveals a strong magnetic field, with indications for deviation from a pure dipole field. We derive magnetic maps and chemical abundance distributions from the LSD profiles, produced using the Zeeman Doppler Imaging code InversLSD. Using a spherical harmonic expansion to characterize the magnetic field, we find that the harmonic energy is concentrated predominantly in the dipole mode (l = 1), with significant contribution from both the poloidal and toroidal components. This toroidal field component is predicted theoretically, but not typically observed for Ap/Bp stars. Chemical abundance maps reveal a helium enhancement in a distinct region where the radial magnetic field is strong. Silicon enhancements are located in two regions, also where the radial field is stronger. Titanium and iron enhancements are slightly offset from the helium enhancements, and are located in areas where the radial field is weak, close to the magnetic equator.
  • OB stars exhibit various types of spectral variability historically associated with wind structures, including the apparently ubiquitous discrete absorption components (DACs). These features have been proposed to be caused either by magnetic fields or non-radial pulsations. In this second paper of this series, we revisit the canonical phenomenological hydrodynamical modelling used to explain the formation of DACs by taking into account modern observations and more realistic theoretical predictions. Using constraints on putative bright spots located on the surface of the O giant $\xi$ Persei derived from high precision space-based broadband optical photometry obtained with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) space telescope, we generate two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of co-rotating interaction regions in its wind. We then compute synthetic ultraviolet (UV) resonance line profiles using Sobolev Exact Integration and compare them with historical timeseries obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) to evaluate if the observed behaviour of $\xi$ Persei's DACs is reproduced. Testing three different models of spot size and strength, we find that the classical pattern of variability can be successfully reproduced for two of them: the model with the smallest spots yields absorption features that are incompatible with observations. Furthermore, we test the effect of the radial dependence of ionization levels on line driving, but cannot conclusively assess the importance of this factor. In conclusion, this study self-consistently links optical photometry and UV spectroscopy, paving the way to a better understanding of cyclical wind variability in massive stars in the context of the bright spot paradigm.
  • A small fraction of the population of intermediate-mass and massive stars host strong and stable magnetic fields organised on large scales. These fields are believed to be remnants of star formation. It is however not clear how such fossil fields have been shaped during their formation and subsequent evolution. We report recent and ongoing studies on the magnetic properties of pre-main sequence stars and main sequence binaries, allowing us to make progress in this field.
  • Stellar rotation affects the transport of chemical elements and angular momentum and is therefore a key process during stellar evolution, which is still not fully understood. This is especially true for massive stars, which are important for the chemical enrichment of the universe. It is therefore important to constrain their physical parameters and internal angular momentum distribution to calibrate stellar structure and evolution models. Stellar internal rotation can be probed through asteroseismic studies of rotationally split oscillations but such results are still quite rare, especially for stars more massive than the Sun. The SPB star HD201433 is known to be part of a single-lined spectroscopic triple system, with two low-mass companions orbiting with periods of about 3.3 and 154 d. Our results are based on photometric observations made by BRITE - Constellation and the SMEI on board the Coriolis satellite, high-resolution spectroscopy, and more than 96 years of radial velocity measurements. We identify a sequence of 9 rotationally split dipole modes in the photometric time series and establish that HD201433 is in principle a solid-body rotator with a very slow rotation period of 297+/-76 d. Tidal interaction with the inner companion has, however, significantly accelerated the spin of the surface layers by a factor of approximately one hundred. The angular momentum transfer onto the surface of HD201433 is also reflected by the statistically significant decrease of the orbital period of about 0.9 s during the last 96 years. Combining the asteroseismic inferences with the spectroscopic measurements and the orbital analysis of the inner binary system, we conclude that tidal interactions between the central SPB star and its inner companion have almost circularised the orbit but not yet aligned all spins of the system and have just begun to synchronise rotation.
  • The O8f?p star HD 108 is implied to have experienced the most extreme rotational braking of any magnetic, massive star, with a rotational period $P_{\rm rot}$ of at least 55 years, but the upper limit on its spindown timescale is over twice the age estimated from the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. HD 108's observed X-ray luminosity is also much higher than predicted by the XADM model, a unique discrepancy amongst magnetic O-type stars. Previously reported magnetic data cover only a small fraction ($\sim$3.5\%) of $P_{\rm rot}$, and were furthermore acquired when the star was in a photometric and spectroscopic `low state' at which the longitudinal magnetic field $\langle B_z\rangle$~was likely at a minimum. We have obtained a new ESPaDOnS magnetic measurement of HD 108, 6 years after the last reported measurement. The star is returning to a spectroscopic high state, although its emission lines are still below their maximum observed strength, consistent with the proposed 55-year period. We measured $\langle B_z\rangle=-325 \pm 45$ G, twice the strength of the 2007-2009 observations, raising the lower limit of the dipole surface magnetic field strength to $B_{\rm d} \ge 1$ kG. The simultaneous increase in $\langle B_z\rangle$~and emission strength is consistent with the oblique rotator model. Extrapolation of the $\langle B_z\rangle$~maximum via comparison of HD 108's spectroscopic and magnetic data with the similar Of?p star HD 191612 suggests that $B_{\rm d} > 2$~kG, yielding $t_{\rm S, max}<3$~Myr, compatible with the stellar age. These results also yield a better agreement between the observed X-ray luminosity and that predicted by the XADM model.
  • {\iota} Ori is a well studied massive binary consisting of an O9 III + B1 III/IV star. Due to its high eccentricity (e = 0.764) and short orbital period (P orb = 29.13376 d), it has been considered to be a good candidate to show evidence of tidal effects; however, none have previously been identified. Using photometry from the BRITE-Constellation space photometry mission we have confirmed the existence of tidal distortions through the presence of a heartbeat signal at periastron. We combine spectroscopic and light curve analyses to measure the masses and radii of the components, revealing {\iota} Ori to be the most massive heartbeat system known to date. In addition, using a thorough frequency analysis, we also report the unprecedented discovery of multiple tidally induced oscillations in an O star. The amplitudes of the pulsations allow us to empirically estimate the tidal circularization rate, yielding an effective tidal quality factor Q $\approx 4 \times 10^{4}$ .
  • Recent spectropolarimetric surveys of bright, hot stars have found that ~10% of OB-type stars contain strong (mostly dipolar) surface magnetic fields (~kG). The prominent paradigm describing the interaction between the stellar winds and the surface magnetic field is the magnetically confined wind shock (MCWS) model. In this model, the stellar wind plasma is forced to move along the closed field loops of the magnetic field, colliding at the magnetic equator, and creating a shock. As the shocked material cools radiatively it will emit X-rays. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in detecting and characterizing the hot wind material confined by the magnetic fields of these stars. Some B-type stars are found to have very short rotational periods. The effects of the rapid rotation on the X-ray production within the magnetosphere have yet to be explored in detail. The added centrifugal force due to rapid rotation is predicted to cause faster wind outflows along the field lines, leading to higher shock temperatures and harder X-rays. However, this is not observed in all rapidly rotating magnetic B-type stars. In order to address this from a theoretical point of view, we use the X-ray Analytical Dynamical Magnetosphere (XADM) model, originally developed for slow rotators, with an implementation of new rapid rotational physics. Using X-ray spectroscopy from ESA's XMM-Newton space telescope, we observed 5 rapidly rotating B-type stars to add to the previous list of observations. Comparing the observed X-ray luminosity and hardness ratio to that predicted by the XADM allows us to determine the role the added centrifugal force plays in the magnetospheric X-ray emission of these stars.
  • $\rho$ Pup is a $\delta$ Scuti F2 pulsator, known to host a main radial mode as well as non-radial pulsations, with chemical peculiarities typical of evolved Am stars. We present high-precision spectropolarimetric observations of this star, obtained with ESPaDOnS at the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) in the frame of the BRITE spectropolarimetric survey. A magnetic field is clearly detected in $\rho$ Pup, with a longitudinal field strength below 1 G. This makes $\rho$ Pup the second known magnetic $\delta$ Scuti discovered, after HD 188774, and a possible cool evolved counterpart of the recently discovered ultra-weakly magnetic Am family.
  • Until recently almost nothing was known about the evolution of magnetic fields found in upper main sequence Ap/Bp stars during their long main sequence lifetime. We are thus studying magnetic Ap/Bp stars in open clusters in order to obtain observational evidence of how the properties of Ap/Bp magnetic stars, such as field strength and structure, evolve with age during the main sequence. One important aspect of this study is to search for the very rare examples of hot magnetic stars in short-period binary systems among magnetic cluster members. In this paper we characterize the object BD-19~5044L, which is both a member of the open cluster IC 4725 = M~25, and a short-period SB2 system containing a magnetic primary star. We have obtained a series of intensity and circular polarisation spectra distributed through the orbital and rotation cycles of BD-19 5044L with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at CFHT. We find that the orbit of BD-19 5044L AB is quite eccentric (e = 0.477), with a period of 17.63 d. The primary is a magnetic Bp star with a variable longitudinal magnetic field, a polar field strength of ~1400 G and a low obliquity, while the secondary is probably a hot Am star and does not appear to be magnetic. The rotation period of the primary (5.04 d) is not synchronised with the orbit, but the rotation angular velocity is close to being synchronised with the orbital angular velocity of the secondary at periastron, perhaps as a result of tidal interactions. The periastron separation is small enough (about 12 times the radius of the primary star) that BD-19 5044L may be one of the very rare known cases of a tidally interacting SB2 binary system containing a magnetic Ap/Bp star.
  • We briefly summarize the BRITE observations of classical Cepheids. Possible detection of modulation in a fundamental mode Cepheid, T Vul, and of additional non-radial modes in first overtone Cepheids, DT Cyg and V1334 Cyg, are reported.
  • The groundbreaking detection of gravitational waves produced by the inspiralling and coalescence of the black hole (BH) binary GW150914 confirms the existence of "heavy" stellar-mass BHs with masses >25 Msun. Initial modelling of the system by Abbott et al. (2016a) supposes that the formation of black holes with such large masses from the evolution of single massive stars is only feasible if the wind mass-loss rates of the progenitors were greatly reduced relative to the mass-loss rates of massive stars in the Galaxy, concluding that heavy BHs must form in low-metallicity (Z < 0.25-0.5 Zsun) environments. However, strong surface magnetic fields also provide a powerful mechanism for modifying mass loss and rotation of massive stars, independent of environmental metallicity (ud-Doula & Owocki 2002; ud-Doula et al. 2008). In this paper we explore the hypothesis that some heavy BHs, with masses >25 Msun such as those inferred to compose GW150914, could be the natural end-point of evolution of magnetic massive stars in a solar-metallicity environment. Using the MESA code, we developed a new grid of single, non-rotating, solar metallicity evolutionary models for initial ZAMS masses from 40-80 Msun that include, for the first time, the quenching of the mass loss due to a realistic dipolar surface magnetic field. The new models predict TAMS masses that are significantly greater than those from equivalent non-magnetic models, reducing the total mass lost by a strongly magnetized 80 Msun star during its main sequence evolution by 20 Msun. This corresponds approximately to the mass loss reduction expected from an environment with metallicity Z = 1/30 Zsun.
  • The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE) Constellation is the first nanosatellite mission applied to astrophysical research. Five satellites in low-Earth orbits perform precise optical two-colour photometry of the brightest stars in the night sky. BRITE is naturally well suited for variability studies of hot stars. This contribution describes the basic outline of the mission and some initial problems that needed to be overcome. Some information on BRITE data products, how to access them, and how to join their scientific exploration is provided. Finally, a brief summary of the first scientific results obtained by BRITE is given.
  • We report a simultaneous ground and space-based photometric study of the Beta Cephei star Nu Eridani. Half a year of observations have been obtained by four of the five satellites constituting BRITE-Constellation, supplemented with ground-based photoelectric photometry. We show that carefully combining the two data sets virtually eliminates the aliasing problem that often hampers time-series analyses. We detect 40 periodic signals intrinsic to the star in the light curves. Despite a lower detection limit we do not recover all the pressure and mixed modes previously reported in the literature, but we newly detect six additional gravity modes. This behaviour is a consequence of temporal changes in the pulsation amplitudes that we also detected for some of the p modes. We point out that the dependence of theoretically predicted pulsation amplitude on wavelength is steeper in visual passbands than those observationally measured, to the extent that the three dominant pulsation modes of Nu Eridani would be incorrectly identified using data in optical filters only. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy.
  • BRITE (BRIght Target Explorer) Constellation, the first nanosatellite mission applied to astrophysical research, is a collaboration among Austria, Canada and Poland. The fleet of satellites (6 launched, 5 functioning) performs precise optical photometry of the brightest stars in the night sky. A pioneering mission like BRITE - with optics and instruments restricted to small volume, mass and power in several nanosatellites, whose measurements must be coordinated in orbit - poses many unique challenges. We discuss the technical issues, including problems encountered during on-orbit commissioning (especially higher-than expected sensitivity of the CCDs to particle radiation). We describe in detail how the BRITE team has mitigated these problems, and provide a complete overview of mission operations. This paper serves as a template for how to effectively plan, build and operate future low-cost niche-driven space astronomy missions.
  • A significant fraction of massive main-sequence stars show strong, large-scale magnetic fields. The origin of these fields, their lifetimes, and their role in shaping the characteristics and evolution of massive stars are currently not well understood. We compile a catalogue of 389 massive main-sequence stars, 61 of which are magnetic, and derive their fundamental parameters and ages. The two samples contain stars brighter than magnitude 9 in the V band and range in mass between 5 and 100 Msun. We find that the fractional main-sequence age distribution of all considered stars follows what is expected for a magnitude limited sample, while that of magnetic stars shows a clear decrease towards the end of the main sequence. This dearth of old magnetic stars is independent of the choice of adopted stellar evolution tracks, and appears to become more prominent when considering only the most massive stars. We show that the decreasing trend in the distribution is significantly stronger than expected from magnetic flux conservation. We also find that binary rejuvenation and magnetic suppression of core convection are unlikely to be responsible for the observed lack of older magnetic massive stars, and conclude that its most probable cause is the decay of the magnetic field, over a time span longer than the stellar lifetime for the lowest considered masses, and shorter for the highest masses. We then investigate the spin-down ages of the slowly rotating magnetic massive stars and find them to exceed the stellar ages by far in many cases. The high fraction of very slowly rotating magnetic stars thus provides an independent argument for a decay of the magnetic fields.
  • This paper aims to precisely determine the masses and detect pulsation modes in the two massive components of Beta Cen with BRITE-Constellation photometry. In addition, seismic models for the components are considered and the effects of fast rotation are discussed. This is done to test the limitations of seismic modeling for this very difficult case. A simultaneous fit of visual and spectroscopic orbits is used to self-consistently derive the orbital parameters, and subsequently the masses, of the components. The derived masses are equal to 12.02 +/- 0.13 and 10.58 +/- 0.18 M_Sun. The parameters of the wider, A - B system, presently approaching periastron passage, are constrained. Analysis of the combined blue- and red-filter BRITE-Constellation photometric data of the system revealed the presence of 19 periodic terms, of which eight are likely g modes, nine are p modes, and the remaining two are combination terms. It cannot be excluded that one or two low-frequency terms are rotational frequencies. It is possible that both components of Beta Cen are Beta Cep/SPB hybrids. An attempt to use the apparent changes of frequency to distinguish which modes originate in which component did not succeed, but there is potential for using this method when more BRITE data become available. Agena seems to be one of very few rapidly rotating massive objects with rich p- and g-mode spectra, and precisely known masses. It can therefore be used to gain a better understanding of the excitation of pulsations in relatively rapidly rotating stars and their seismic modeling. Finally, this case illustrates the potential of BRITE-Constellation data for the detection of rich-frequency spectra of small-amplitude modes in massive pulsating stars.
  • We report on an analysis of high-precision, multi-colour photometric observations of the rapidly-oscillating Ap (roAp) star $\alpha$ Cir. These observations were obtained with the BRITE-Constellation, which is a coordinated mission of five nanosatellites that collects continuous millimagnitude-precision photometry of dozens of bright stars for up to 180 days at a time in two colours (Johnson B and R). BRITE stands for BRight Target Explorer. The object $\alpha$ Cir is the brightest roAp star and an ideal target for such investigations, facilitating the determination of oscillation frequencies with high resolution. This star is bright enough for complementary interferometry and time-resolved spectroscopy. Four BRITE satellites observed $\alpha$ Cir for 146 d or 33 rotational cycles. Phasing the photometry according to the 4.4790 d rotational period reveals qualitatively different light variations in the two photometric bands. The phased red-band photometry is in good agreement with previously-published WIRE data, showing a light curve symmetric about phase 0.5 with a strong contribution from the first harmonic. The phased blue-band data, in contrast, show an essentially sinusoidal variation. We model both light curves with Bayesian Photometric Imaging, which suggests the presence of two large-scale, photometrically bright (relative to the surrounding photosphere) spots. We also examine the high-frequency pulsation spectrum as encoded in the BRITE photometry. Our analysis establishes the stability of the main pulsation frequency over the last 20 years, confirms the presence of frequency f7, which was not detected (or the mode not excited) prior to 2006, and excludes quadrupolar modes for the main pulsation frequency.
  • We observed NGC 1624-2, the O-type star with the largest known magnetic field Bp~20 kG), in X-rays with the ACIS-S camera onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Our two observations were obtained at the minimum and maximum of the periodic Halpha emission cycle, corresponding to the rotational phases where the magnetic field is the closest to equator-on and pole-on, respectively. With these observations, we aim to characterise the star's magnetosphere via the X-ray emission produced by magnetically confined wind shocks. Our main findings are: (i) The observed spectrum of NGC 1624-2 is hard, similar to the magnetic O-type star Theta 1 Ori C, with only a few photons detected below 0.8 keV. The emergent X-ray flux is 30% lower at the Halpha minimum phase. (ii) Our modelling indicated that this seemingly hard spectrum is in fact a consequence of relatively soft intrinsic emission, similar to other magnetic Of?p stars, combined with a large amount of local absorption (~1-3 x 10^22 cm^-2). This combination is necessary to reproduce both the prominent Mg and Si spectral features, and the lack of flux at low energies. NGC 1624-2 is intrinsically luminous in X-rays (log LX emission ~ 33.4) but 70-95% of the X-ray emission produced by magnetically confined wind shocks is absorbed before it escapes the magnetosphere (log LX ISM corrected ~ 32.5). (iii) The high X-ray luminosity, its variation with stellar rotation, and its large attenuation are all consistent with a large dynamical magnetosphere with magnetically confined wind shocks.
  • The initial success of the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere (RRM) model application to the B2Vp star sigma OriE by Townsend, Owocki & Groote (2005) triggered a renewed era of observational monitoring of this archetypal object. We utilize high-resolution spectropolarimetry and the magnetic Doppler imaging (MDI) technique to simultaneously determine the magnetic configuration, which is predominately dipolar, with a polar strength Bd = 7.3-7.8 kG and a smaller non-axisymmetric quadrupolar contribution, as well as the surface distribution of abundance of He, Fe, C, and Si. We describe a revised RRM model that now accepts an arbitrary surface magnetic field configuration, with the field topology from the MDI models used as input. The resulting synthetic Ha emission and broadband photometric observations generally agree with observations, however, several features are poorly fit. To explore the possibility of a photospheric contribution to the observed photometric variability, the MDI abundance maps were used to compute a synthetic photospheric light curve to determine the effect of the surface inhomogeneities. Including the computed photospheric brightness modulation fails to improve the agreement between the observed and computed photometry. We conclude that the discrepancies cannot be explained as an effect of inhomogeneous surface abundance. Analysis of the UV light variability shows good agreement between observed variability and computed light curves, supporting the accuracy of the photospheric light variation calculation. We thus conclude that significant additional physics is necessary for the RRM model to acceptably reproduce observations of not only sigma Ori E, but also other similar stars with significant stellar wind-magnetic field interactions.
  • We have carried out a study of radio emission from a small sample of magnetic O- and B-type stars using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, with the goal of investigating their magnetospheres at low frequencies. These are the lowest frequency radio measurements ever obtained of hot magnetic stars. The observations were taken at random rotational phases in the 1390 and the 610 MHz bands. Out of the 8 stars, we detect five B-type stars in both the 1390 and the 610 MHz bands. The O-type stars were observed only in the 1390 MHz band, and no detections were obtained. We explain this result as a consequence of free-free absorption by the free-flowing stellar wind exterior to the closed magnetosphere. We also study the variability of individual stars. One star - HD 133880 - exhibits remarkably strong and rapid variability of its low frequency flux density. We discuss the possibility of this emission being coherent emission as reported for CU Vir by Trigilio et al. (2000).
  • We analyze a high resolution spectropolarimetric dataset collected for the He-weak B3p IV star HR 2949. The Zeeman effect is visible in the circularly polarized component of numerous spectral lines. The longitudinal magnetic field varies between approximately $-650$ and $+150$ G. The polar strength of the surface magnetic dipole is calculated to be 2.4$^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ kG. The star has strong overabundances of Fe-peak elements, along with extremely strong overabundances of rare-earth elements; however, He, Al, and S are underabundant. This implies that HR 2949 is a chemically peculiar star. Variability is seen in all photospheric lines, likely due to abundance patches as seen in many Ap/Bp stars. Longitudinal magnetic field variations measured from different spectral lines yield different results, likely a consequence of uneven sampling of the photospheric magnetic field by the abundance patches. Analysis of photometric and spectroscopic data for both HR 2949 and its companion star, HR 2948, suggests a revision of HR 2949's fundamental parameters: in particular, it is somewhat larger, hotter, and more luminous than previously believed. There is no evidence of optical or ultraviolet emission originating in HR 2949's magnetosphere, despite its moderately strong magnetic field and relatively rapid rotation; however, when calculated using theoretical and empirical boundaries on the initial rotational velocity, the spindown age is compatible with the stellar age. With the extensive phase coverage presented here, HR 2949 will make an excellent subject for Zeeman Doppler Imaging.