• By performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations, we address the topological phase of CaAgP and investigate the topological phase transition in CaAg(P1-xAsx). We reveal that in CaAgP, the bulk band gap and surface states with a large bandwidth are topologically trivial, in agreement with hybrid density functional theory calculations. The calculations also indicate that application of "negative" hydrostatic pressure can transform trivial semiconducting CaAgP into an ideal topological nodal-line semimetal phase. The topological transition can be realized by partial isovalent P/As substitution at x = 0.38.
  • $\mathrm{MoTe_2}$ has recently been shown to realize in its low-temperature phase the type-II Weyl semimetal (WSM). We investigated by time- and angle- resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) the possible influence of the Weyl points in the electron dynamics above the Fermi level $\mathrm{E_F}$, by comparing the ultrafast response of $\mathrm{MoTe_2}$ in the trivial and topological phases. In the low-temperature WSM phase, we report an enhanced relaxation rate of electrons optically excited to the conduction band, which we interpret as a fingerprint of the local gap closure when Weyl points form. By contrast, we find that the electron dynamics of the related compound $\mathrm{WTe_2}$ is slower and temperature-independent, consistent with a topologically trivial nature of this material. Our results shows that tr-ARPES is sensitive to the small modifications of the unoccupied band structure accompanying the structural and topological phase transition of $\mathrm{MoTe_2}$.
  • We report a detailed study of the transport coefficients of $\beta$-Bi$_4$I$_4$ quasi-one dimensional topological insulator. Electrical resistivity, thermoelectric power, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient measurements are consistent with the possible appearance of a charge density wave order at low temperatures. Both electrons and holes contribute to the conduction in $\beta$-Bi$_4$I$_4$ and the dominant type of charge carrier changes with temperature as a consequence of temperature-dependent carrier densities and mobilities. Measurements of resistivity and Seebeck coefficient under hydrostatic pressure up to 2 GPa show a shift of the charge density wave order to higher temperatures suggesting a strongly one-dimensional character at ambient pressure. Surprisingly, superconductivity is induced in $\beta$-Bi$_4$I$_4$ above 10 GPa with of 4.0 K which is slightly decreasing upon increasing the pressure up to 20 GPa. Chemical characterisation of the pressure-treated samples shows amorphization of $\beta$-Bi$_4$I$_4$ under pressure and rules out decomposition into Bi and BiI$_3$ at room-temperature conditions.
  • The Weyl semimetal phase is a recently discovered topological quantum state of matter characterized by the presence of topologically protected degeneracies near the Fermi level. These degeneracies are the source of exotic phenomena, including the realization of chiral Weyl fermions as quasiparticles in the bulk and the formation of Fermi arc states on the surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that these two key signatures show distinct evolutions with the bulk band topology by performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, supported by first-principle calculations, on transition-metal monophosphides. While Weyl fermion quasiparticles exist only when the chemical potential is located between two saddle points of the Weyl cone features, the Fermi arc states extend in a larger energy scale and are robust across the bulk Lifshitz transitions associated with the recombination of two non-trivial Fermi surfaces enclosing one Weyl point into a single trivial Fermi surface enclosing two Weyl points of opposite chirality. Therefore, in some systems (e.g. NbP), topological Fermi arc states are preserved even if Weyl fermion quasiparticles are absent in the bulk. Our findings not only provide insight into the relationship between the exotic physical phenomena and the intrinsic bulk band topology in Weyl semimetals, but also resolve the apparent puzzle of the different magneto-transport properties observed in TaAs, TaP and NbP, where the Fermi arc states are similar.
  • We here report a detailed high-pressure infrared transmission study of BiTeCl and BiTeBr. We follow the evolution of two band transitions: the optical excitation $\beta$ between two Rashba-split conduction bands, and the absorption $\gamma$ across the band gap. In the low pressure range, $p< 4$~GPa, for both compounds $\beta$ is approximately constant with pressure and $\gamma$ decreases, in agreement with band structure calculations. In BiTeCl, a clear pressure-induced phase transition at 6~GPa leads to a different ground state. For BiTeBr, the pressure evolution is more subtle, and we discuss the possibility of closing and reopening of the band gap. Our data is consistent with a Weyl phase in BiTeBr at 5$-$6~GPa, followed by the onset of a structural phase transition at 7~GPa.
  • The complex electronic properties of $\mathrm{ZrTe_5}$ have recently stimulated in-depth investigations that assigned this material to either a topological insulator or a 3D Dirac semimetal phase. Here we report a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of both electronic and structural properties of $\mathrm{ZrTe_5}$, revealing that the bulk material is a strong topological insulator (STI). By means of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we identify at the top of the valence band both a surface and a bulk state. The dispersion of these bands is well captured by ab initio calculations for the STI case, for the specific interlayer distance measured in our x-ray diffraction study. Furthermore, these findings are supported by scanning tunneling spectroscopy revealing the metallic character of the sample surface, thus confirming the strong topological nature of $\mathrm{ZrTe_5}$.
  • The recently discovered type-II Weyl points appear at the boundary between electron and hole pockets. Type-II Weyl semimetals that host such points are predicted to exhibit a new type of chiral anomaly and possess thermodynamic properties very different from their type-I counterparts. In this Letter, we describe the prediction of a type-II Weyl semimetal phase in the transition metal diphosphides MoP$_2$ and WP$_2$. These materials are characterized by relatively simple band structures with four pairs of type-II Weyl points. Neighboring Weyl points have the same chirality, which makes the predicted topological phase robust with respect to small perturbations of the crystalline lattice. In addition, this peculiar arrangement of the Weyl points results in long topological Fermi arcs, thus making them readily accessible in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.
  • A Weyl semimetal possesses spin-polarized band-crossings, called Weyl nodes, connected by topological surface arcs. The low-energy excitations near the crossing points behave the same as massless Weyl fermions, leading to exotic properties like chiral anomaly. To have the transport properties dominated by Weyl fermions, Weyl nodes need to locate nearly at the chemical potential and enclosed by pairs of individual Fermi surfaces with nonzero Fermi Chern numbers. Combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation, here we show that TaP is a Weyl semimetal with only single type of Weyl fermions, topologically distinguished from TaAs where two types of Weyl fermions contribute to the low-energy physical properties. The simple Weyl fermions in TaP are not only of fundamental interests but also of great potential for future applications. Fermi arcs on the Ta-terminated surface are observed, which appear in a different pattern from that on the As-termination in TaAs and NbAs.
  • Bulk Rashba systems BiTeX (X = I, Br, Cl) are emerging as important candidates for developing spintronics devices, because of the coexistence of spin-split bulk and surface states, along with the ambipolar character of the surface charge carriers. The need of studying the spin texture of strongly spin-orbit coupled materials has recently promoted circular dichroic Angular Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (cd-ARPES) as an indirect tool to measure the spin and the angular degrees of freedom. Here we report a detailed photon energy dependent study of the cd-ARPES spectra in BiTeX (X = I, Br and Cl). Our work reveals a large variation of the magnitude and sign of the dichroism. Interestingly, we find that the dichroic signal modulates differently for the three compounds and for the different spin-split states. These findings show a momentum and photon energy dependence for the cd-ARPES signals in the bulk Rashba semiconductor BiTeX (X = I, Br, Cl). Finally, the outcome of our experiment indicates the important relation between the modulation of the dichroism and the phase differences between the wave-functions involved in the photoemission process. This phase difference can be due to initial or final state effects. In the former case the phase difference results in possible interference effects among the photo-electrons emitted from different atomic layers and characterized by entangled spin-orbital polarized bands. In the latter case the phase difference results from the relative phases of the expansion of the final state in different outgoing partial waves.
  • Atomically precise tailoring of graphene can enable unusual transport pathways and new nanometer-scale functional devices. Here we describe a recipe for the controlled production of highly regular "5-5-8" line defects in graphene by means of simultaneous electron irradiation and Joule heating by applied electric current. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals individual steps of the growth process. Extending earlier theoretical work suggesting valley-discriminating capabilities of a graphene 5-5-8 line defect, we perform first-principles calculations of transport and find a strong energy dependence of valley polarization of the charge carriers across the defect. These findings inspire us to propose a compact electrostatically gated "valley valve" device, a critical component for valleytronics.
  • The electronic and magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms adsorbed on the surface of the topological insulator Bi$_2$Te$_3$(111) are investigated. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy prove the existence of two distinct types of Fe species, while our first-principles calculations assign them to Fe adatoms in the hcp and fcc hollow sites. The combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements and angular dependent magnetization curves reveals out-of-plane anisotropies for both species with anisotropy constants of $K_{\text{fcc}} = (10 \pm 4)$ meV/atom and $K_{\text{hcp}} = (8 \pm 4)$ meV/atom. These values are well in line with the results of calculations.
  • The non-centrosymmetric semiconductor BiTeI exhibits two distinct surface terminations that support spin-split Rashba surface states. Their ambipolarity can be exploited for creating spin-polarized $p$-$n$ junctions at the boundaries between domains with different surface terminations. We use scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) to locate such junctions and investigate their atomic and electronic properties. The Te- and I-terminated surfaces are identified owing to their distinct chemical reactivity, and an apparent height mismatch of electronic origin. The Rashba surface states are revealed in the STS spectra by the onset of a van Hove singularity at the band edge. Eventually, an electronic depletion is found on interfacial Te atoms, consistent with the formation of a space charge area in typical $p$-$n$ junctions.
  • BiTeI is a giant Rashba spin splitting system, in which a non-centro symmetric topological phase has recently been suggested to appear under high pressure. We investigated the optical properties of this compound, reflectivity and transmission, under pressures up to $15$ GPa. The gap feature in the optical conductivity vanishes above $p \sim 9$ GPa and does not reappear up to at least $15$ GPa. The plasma edge, associated with intrinsically doped charge carriers, is smeared out through a phase transition at $9$ GPa. Using high pressure Raman spectroscopy, we follow the vibrational modes of BiTeI, providing additional clear evidence that the transition at 9 GPa involves a change of crystal structure. This change of crystal structure possibly inhibits the high-pressure topological phase from occurring.
  • We report a comprehensive study of the paradigmatic quasi-1D compound (TaSe4)2I performed by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles electronic structure calculations. We find it to be a zero-gap semiconductor in the non-distorted structure, with non-negligible interchain coupling. Theory and experiment support a Peierls-like scenario for the CDW formation below T_CDW = 263 K, where the incommensurability is a direct consequence of the finite interchain coupling. The formation of small polarons, strongly suggested by the ARPES data, explains the puzzling semiconductor-to-semiconductor transition observed in transport at T_CDW.
  • We observe a giant spin-orbit splitting in bulk and surface states of the non-centrosymmetric semiconductor BiTeI. We show that the Fermi level can be placed in the valence or in the conduction band by controlling the surface termination. In both cases it intersects spin-polarized bands, in the corresponding surface depletion and accumulation layers. The momentum splitting of these bands is not affected by adsorbate-induced changes in the surface potential. These findings demonstrate that two properties crucial for enabling semiconductor-based spin electronics -- a large, robust spin splitting and ambipolar conduction -- are present in this material.
  • A new physical mechanism for generating spin-transfer torque is proposed. It is due to interference of bias driven nonequilibrium electrons incident on a switching junction with the electrons reflected from an insulating barrier inserted in the junction after the switching magnet. It is shown using the rigorous Keldysh formalism that this new out-of-plane torque $T_{\perp}$ is proportional to an applied bias and is as large as the torque in a conventional junction generated by a strong charge current. However, the charge current and the in-plane torque $T_{\parallel}$ are almost completely suppressed by the insulating barrier. This new junction thus offers the highly applicable possibility of bias-induced switching of magnetization without charge current.