• The EAGLE and EVE Phase A studies for instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) originated from related top-level scientific questions, but employed different (yet complementary) methods to deliver the required observations. We re-examine the motivations for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) on the E-ELT and present a unified set of requirements for a versatile instrument. Such a MOS would exploit the excellent spatial resolution in the near-infrared envisaged for EAGLE, combined with aspects of the spectral coverage and large multiplex of EVE. We briefly discuss the top-level systems which could satisfy these requirements in a single instrument at one of the Nasmyth foci of the E-ELT.
  • We have determined the composite luminosity function (LF) for galaxies in 60 clusters from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. The LF spans the range $-22.5<M_{b_{\rm J}}<-15$, and is well-fitted by a Schechter function with ${M_{b_{\rm J}}}^{*}=-20.07\pm0.07$ and $\alpha=-1.28\pm0.03$ ($H_0$=100 km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$, $\Omega_M$=0.3, $\Omega_\Lambda$=0.7). It differs significantly from the field LF of \cite{mad02}, having a characteristic magnitude that is approximately 0.3 mag brighter and a faint-end slope that is approximately 0.1 steeper. There is no evidence for variations in the LF across a wide range of cluster properties. However the LF of early-type galaxies in clusters is both brighter and steeper than its field counterpart. The differences between the field and cluster LFs for the various spectral types can be qualitatively explained by the suppression of star formation in the dense cluster environment, together with mergers to produce the brightest early-type galaxies.
  • The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey is the first to observe more than 100,000 redshifts. This allows precise measurements of many of the key statistics of galaxy clustering, in particular redshift-space distortions and the large-scale power spectrum. This paper presents the current 2dFGRS results in these areas. Redshift-space distortions are detected with a high degree of significance, confirming the detailed Kaiser distortion from large-scale infall velocities, and measuring the distortion parameter beta equiv Omega_m^{0.6}/b = 0.43 +- 0.07. The power spectrum is measured to < 10% accuracy for k > 0.02 h Mpc^{-1}, and is well fitted by a CDM model with Omega_m h = 0.20 +- 0.03 and a baryon fraction of 0.15 +- 0.07. A joint analysis with CMB data requires Omega_m = 0.29 +- 0.05, assuming scalar fluctuations, but no priors on other parameters. Two methods are used to determine the large-scale bias parameter: an internal bispectrum analysis yields b = 1.04 +- 0.11, in very good agreement with the b = 1.10 +- 0.08 obtained from a joint 2dFGRS+CMB analysis, again assuming scalar fluctuations. These figures refer to galaxies of approximate luminosity 2L^*; luminosity dependence of clustering is detected at high significance, and is well described by b/b^* = 0.85 + 0.15(L/L^*).
  • The 2dF (Two-degree Field) facility at the prime focus of the Anglo-Australian Telescope provides multiple object spectroscopy over a 2 degree field of view. Up to 400 target fibres can be independently positioned by a complex robot. Two spectrographs provide spectra with resolutions of between 500 and 2000, over wavelength ranges of 440nm and 110nm respectively. The 2dF facility began routine observations in 1997. 2dF was designed primarily for galaxy redshift surveys and has a number of innovative features. The large corrector lens incorporates an atmospheric dispersion compensator, essential for wide wavelength coverage with small diameter fibres. The instrument has two full sets of fibres on separate field plates, so that re-configuring can be done in parallel with observing. The robot positioner places one fibre every 6 seconds, to a precision of 0.3 arcsec (20micron) over the full field. All components of 2dF, including the spectrographs, are mounted on a 5-m diameter telescope top-end ring for ease of handling and to keep the optical fibres short in order to maximise UV throughput . There is a pipeline data reduction system which allows each data set to be fully analysed while the next field is being observed. In this paper we provide the historical background to the 2dF facility, the design philosophy, a full technical description and a summary of the performance of the instrument. We also briefly review its scientific applications and possible future developments.
  • We present the results of the deepest optically identified X-ray survey yet made. The X-ray survey was made with the ROSAT PSPC and reaches a flux limit of 1.6x10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1 (0.5--2.0 keV). Above a flux limit of 2x10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1 we define a complete sample of 70 sources of which 59 are identified. Some (5) other sources have tentative identifications and in a further 4 the X-ray error-boxes are blank to R=23 mag. At the brighter flux levels (>= 10^-14 erg cm^-2 s^-1) we confirm the results of previous less deep X-ray surveys with 84% of the sources begin QSOs. At fainter fluxes, however, the survey is dominated by a population of galaxies with narrow optical emission lines (NELGs). In addition, a number of groups and clusters of galaxies are found at intermediate fluxes. Most of these are poor systems of low X-ray luminosity and are generally found at redshifts of > 0.3. Their numbers are consistent with a zero evolutionary scenario, in contrast to the situation for high luminosity clusters at the same redshift. We discuss the significance of these results to the determination of the cosmic soft X-ray background (XRB) and show that at 2x10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1, we have resolved more than 50% of the background. We also briefly consider the probable importance of NELG objects to the residual background and look at some of the properties of these unusual objects.