• A mean-field treatment is presented of a square lattice two-orbital-model for ${\rm BiS_2}$ taking into account intra- and inter-orbital superconductivity. A rich phase diagram involving both types of superconductivity is presented as a function of the ratio between the couplings of electrons in the same and different orbitals (${\rm \eta= V_{XX}/V_{XY}}$) and electron doping $x$. With the help of a quantity we call orbital-mixing ratio, denoted as $R(\phi)$, the phase diagram is analyzed using a simple and intuitive picture based on how $R(\phi)$ varies as electron doping increases. The predictive power of $R(\phi)$ suggests that it could be a useful tool in qualitatively (or even semi-quantitatively) analyzing multiband superconductivity in BCS-like superconductors.
  • The $SU(4)-SU(2)$ crossover, driven by an external magnetic field $h$, is analyzed in a capacitively-coupled double-quantum-dot device connected to independent leads. As one continuously charges the dots from empty to quarter-filled, by varying the gate potential $V_g$, the crossover starts when the magnitude of the spin polarization of the double quantum dot, as measured by $\langle n_{\uparrow}\rangle -\langle n_{\downarrow}\rangle$, becomes finite. Although the external magnetic field breaks the $SU(4)$ symmetry of the Hamiltonian, the ground state preserves it in a region of $V_g$, where $\langle n_{\uparrow}\rangle -\langle n_{\downarrow}\rangle =0$. Once the spin polarization becomes finite, it initially increases slowly until a sudden change occurs, in which $\langle n_{\downarrow}\rangle$ (polarization direction opposite to the magnetic field) reaches a maximum and then decreases to negligible values abruptly, at which point an orbital $SU(2)$ ground state is fully established. This crossover from one Kondo state, with emergent $SU(4)$ symmetry, where spin and orbital degrees of freedom all play a role, to another, with $SU(2)$ symmetry, where only orbital degrees of freedom participate, is triggered by a competition between $g\mu_Bh$, the energy gain by the Zeeman-split polarized state and the Kondo temperature $T_K^{SU(4)}$, the gain provided by the $SU(4)$ unpolarized Kondo-singlet state.
  • In the present work, we investigate the electronic transport through a T-shape double quantum dot system coupled to two normal leads and to one superconducting lead. We explore the interplay between Kondo and Andreev states due to proximity effects. We find that Kondo resonance is modified by the Andreev bound states, which manifest through Fano antiresonances in the local density of states of the embedded quantum dot and normal transmission. This means that there is a correlation between Andreev bound states and Fano resonances that is robust under the influence of high electronic correlation. We have also found that the dominant couplings at the quantum dots are characterized by a crossover region that defines the range where the Fano-Kondo and the Andreev-Kondo effect prevail in each quantum dot. Likewise, we find that the interaction between Kondo and Andreev bound states has a notable influence on the Andreev transport.
  • Recent ARPES measurements [Phys. Rev. B 92, 041113 (2015)] have confirmed the one-dimensional character of the electronic structure of CeO0.5F0.5BiS2, a representative of BiS2-based superconductors. In addition, several members of this family present sizable increase in the superconducting transition temperature Tc under application of hydrostatic pressure. Motivated by these two results, we propose a one-dimensional three-orbital model, whose kinetic energy part, obtained through ab initio calculations, is supplemented by pair-scattering terms, which are treated at the mean-field level. We solve the gap equations self-consistently and then systematically probe which combination of pair-scattering terms gives results consistent with experiment, namely, a superconducting dome with a maximum Tc at the right chemical potential and a sizable increase in Tc when the magnitude of the hoppings is increased. For these constraints to be satisfied multi-gap superconductivity is required, in agreement with experiments, and one of the hoppings has a dominant influence over the increase of Tc with pressure.
  • We study numerically the low-temperature electronic transport properties of a single-ion magnet with uniaxial and transverse spin anisotropies. We find clear signatures of a Kondo effect caused by the presence of a transverse (zero-field) anisotropy in the molecule. Upon applying a transverse magnetic field to the single-ion magnet, we observe oscillations of the Kondo effect due to the presence of diabolical (degeneracy) points of the energy spectrum of the molecule caused by a geometrical phase interference effects similar to those observed in the quantum tunneling of multi-ion molecular nanomagnets. The field-induced lifting of the ground state degeneracy competes with the interference modulation, resulting in some cases in a suppression of the Kondo peak.
  • Magnetic impurities embedded in a metal interact via an effective Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling mediated by the conduction electrons, which is commonly assumed to be long ranged, with an algebraic decay in the inter-impurity distance. However, they can also form a Kondo screened state that is oblivious to the presence of other impurities. The competition between these effects leads to a critical distance above which Kondo effect dominates, translating into a finite range for the RKKY interaction. We study this mechanism on the square and cubic lattices by introducing an exact mapping onto an effective one-dimensional problem that we can solve with the density matrix renormalization group method (DMRG). We show a clear departure from the conventional RKKY theory, that can be attributed to the dimensionality and different densities of states. In particular, for dimension d>1, Kondo physics dominates even at short distances, while the ferromagnetic RKKY state is energetically unfavorable.
  • A double quantum dot device, connected to two channels that only see each other through interdot Coulomb repulsion, is analyzed using the numerical renormalization group technique. By using a two-impurity Anderson model, and parameter values obtained from experiment [S. Amasha {\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\bf 110}, 046604 (2013)], it is shown that, by applying a moderate magnetic field, and adjusting the gate potential of each quantum dot, opposing spin polarizations are created in each channel. Furthermore, through a well defined change in the gate potentials, the polarizations can be reversed. This polarization effect is clearly associated to a spin-orbital Kondo state having a Kondo peak that originates from spatially separated parts of the device. This fact opens the exciting possibility of experimentally probing the internal structure of an SU(2) Kondo state.
  • We present a completely unbiased and controlled numerical method to solve quantum impurity problems in d-dimensional lattices. This approach is based on a canonical transformation, of the Lanczos form, where the complete lattice Hamiltonian is exactly mapped onto an equivalent one dimensional system, in the same spirit as Wilson's numerical renormalization. The method is particularly suited to study systems that are inhomogeneous, and/or have a boundary. As a proof of concept, we use the density matrix renormalization group to solve the equivalent one-dimensional problem. The resulting dimensional reduction translates into a reduction of the scaling of the entanglement entropy by a factor $L^{d-1}$, where L is the linear dimension of the original d-dimensional lattice. This allows one to calculate the ground state of a magnetic impurity attached to an LxL square lattice and an LxLxL cubic lattice with L up to 140 sites. We also study the localized edge states in graphene nanoribbons by attaching a magnetic impurity to the edge or the center of the system. For armchair metallic nanoribbons we find a slow decay of the spin correlations as a consequence of the delocalized metallic states. In the case of zigzag ribbons, the decay of the spin correlations depends on the position of the impurity. If the impurity is situated in the bulk of the ribbon, the decay is slow as in the metallic case. On the other hand, if the adatom is attached to the edge, the decay is fast, within few sites of the impurity, as a consequence of the localized edge states, and the short correlation length. The mapping can be combined with ab-initio band structure calculations to model the system, and to understand correlation effects in quantum impurity problems from first principles.
  • A system of two interacting cobalt atoms, at varying distances, was studied in a recent scanning tunneling microscope experiment by Bork et. al.[Nature Phys. 7, 901 (2011)]. We propose a microscopic model that explains, for all experimentally analyzed interatomic distances, the physics observed in these experiments. Our proposal is based on the two-impurity Anderson model, with the inclusion of a two-path geometry for charge transport. This many-body system is treated in the finite-U slave boson mean-field approximation and the logarithmic-discretization embedded-cluster approximation. We physically characterize the different charge transport regimes of this system at various interatomic distances and show that, as in the experiments, the features observed in the transport properties depend on the presence of two impurities but also on the existence of two conducting channels for electron transport. We interpret the splitting observed in the conductance as the result of the hybridization of the two Kondo resonances associated with each impurity.
  • In this work we use the Slave Boson Mean Field Approximation at finite U to study the effects of spin-spin correlations in the transport properties of two quantum dots coupled in series to metallic leads. Different quantum regimes of this system are studied in a wide range of parameter space. The main aspects related to the interplay between the half-filling Kondo effect and the antiferromagnetic correlation between the quantum dots are reviewed. Slave boson results for conductance, local density of states in the quantum dots, and the renormalized energy parameters, are presented. As a different approach to the Kondo physics in a double dot system, the Kondo cloud extension inside the metallic leads is calculated and its dependence with the inter-dot coupling is analyzed. In addition, the cloud extension permits the calculation of the Kondo temperature of the double quantum dot. This result is very similar to the corresponding critical temperature $T_c$, as a function of the parameters of the system, as obtained by using the finite temperature extension of the Slave Boson Mean Field Approximation.
  • A detailed study of the low-temperature physics of an interacting double quantum dot system in a T-shape configuration is presented. Each quantum dot is modeled by a single Anderson impurity and we include an inter-dot electron-electron interaction to account for capacitive coupling that may arise due to the proximity of the quantum dots. By employing a numerical renormalization group approach to a multi-impurity Anderson model, we study the thermodynamical and transport properties of the system in and out of the Kondo regime. We find that the two-stage-Kondo effect reported in previous works is drastically affected by the inter-dot Coulomb repulsion. In particular, we find that the Kondo temperature for the second stage of the two-stage-Kondo effect increases exponentially with the inter-dot Coulomb repulsion, providing a possible path for its experimental observation.
  • In this work, we use three different numerical techniques to study the charge transport properties of a system in the two-level SU(2) (2LSU2) regime, obtained from an SU(4) model Hamiltonian by introducing orbital mixing of the degenerate orbitals via coupling to the leads. SU(4) Kondo physics has been experimentally observed, and studied in detail, in Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots. Adopting a two molecular orbital basis, the Hamiltonian is recast into a form where one of the molecular orbitals decouples from the charge reservoir, although still interacting capacitively with the other molecular orbital. This basis transformation explains in a clear way how the charge transport in this system turns from double- to single-channel when it transitions from the SU(4) to the 2LSU2 regime. The charge occupancy of these molecular orbitals displays gate-potential-dependent occupancy oscillations that arise from a competition between the Kondo and Intermediate Valence states. The determination of whether the Kondo or the Intermediate Valence state is more favorable, for a specific value of gate potential, is assessed by the definition of an energy scale $T_0$, which is calculated through DMRG. We speculate that the calculation of $T_0$ may provide experimentalists with a useful tool to analyze correlated charge transport in many other systems. For that, a current work is underway to improve the numerical accuracy of its DRMG calculation and explore different definitions.
  • Transport through carbon nanotube (CNT) quantum dots (QDs) in a magnetic field is discussed. The evolution of the system from the ultraviolet to the infrared is analyzed; the strongly correlated (SC) states arising in the infrared are investigated. Experimental consequences of the physics are presented -- the SC states arising at various fillings are shown to be drastically different, with distinct signatures in the conductance and, in particular, the noise. Besides CNT QDs, our results are also relevant to double QD systems.
  • Transport properties of an interacting triple quantum dot system coupled to three leads in a triangular geometry has been studied in the Kondo regime. Applying mean-field finite-U slave boson and embedded cluster approximations to the calculation of transport properties unveils a set of rich features associated to the high symmetry of this system. Results using both calculation techniques yield excellent overall agreement and provide additional insights into the physical behavior of this interesting geometry. In the case when just two current leads are connected to the three-dot system, interference effects between degenerate molecular orbitals are found to strongly affect the overall conductance. An S=1 Kondo effect is also shown to appear for the perfect equilateral triangle symmetry. The introduction of a third current lead results in an `amplitude leakage' phenomenon, akin to that appearing in beam splitters, which alters the interference effects and the overall conductance through the system.
  • We apply the adaptive time-dependent Density Matrix Renormalization Group method (tDMRG) to the study of transport properties of quantum-dot systems connected to metallic leads. Finite-size effects make the usual tDMRG description of the Kondo regime a numerically demanding task. We show that such effects can be attenuated by describing the leads by "Wilson chains", in which the hopping matrix elements decay exponentially away from the impurity ($t_n \propto \Lambda^{-n/2}$). For a given system size and in the linear response regime, results for $\Lambda > 1$ show several improvements over the undamped, $\Lambda=1$ case: perfect conductance is obtained deeper in the strongly interacting regime and current plateaus remain well defined for longer time scales. Similar improvements were obtained in the finite-bias regime up to bias voltages of the order of the Kondo temperature. These results show that, with the proposed modification, the tDMRG characterization of Kondo correlations in the transport properties can be substantially improved, while it turns out to be sufficient to work with much smaller system sizes. We discuss the numerical cost of this approach with respect to the necessary system sizes and the entanglement growth during the time-evolution.
  • Numerical calculations simulate transport experiments in carbon nanotube quantum dots (P. Jarillo-Herrero et al., Nature 434, 484 (2005)), where a strongly enhanced Kondo temperature T_K ~ 8K was associated with the SU(4) symmetry of the Hamiltonian at quarter-filling for an orbitally double-degenerate single-occupied electronic shell. Our results clearly suggest that the Kondo conductance measured for an adjacent shell with T_K ~ 16K, interpreted as a singlet-triplet Kondo effect, can be associated instead to an SU(4) Kondo effect at half-filling. Besides presenting spin-charge Kondo screening similar to the quarter-filling SU(4), the half-filling SU(4) has been recently associated to very rich physical behavior, including a non-Fermi-liquid state (M. R. Galpin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186406 (2005)).
  • Numerical calculations are shown to reproduce the main results of recent experiments involving nonlocal spin control in nanostructures (N. J. Craig et al., Science 304, 565 (2004)). In particular, the splitting of the zero-bias-peak discovered experimentally is clearly observed in our studies. To understand these results, a simple "circuit model" is introduced and shown to provide a good qualitative description of the experiments. The main idea is that the splitting originates in a Fano anti-resonance, which is caused by having one quantum dot side-connected in relation to the current's path. This scenario provides an explanation of Craig et al.'s results that is alternative to the RKKY proposal, which is here also addressed.
  • Numerical results are presented for transport properties of two coupled double-level quantum dots. The results strongly suggest that under appropriate circumstances the dots can develop a novel ferromagnetic (FM) correlation at quarter-filling (one electron per dot). In the strong coupling regime (Coulomb repulsion larger than electron hopping) and with the inter-dot tunneling larger than the tunneling to the leads, an S=1 Kondo resonance develops in the density of states, leading to a peak in the conductance. A qualitative 'phase diagram', incorporating the new FM phase, is presented. It is also shown that the conditions necessary for the FM regime are less restrictive than naively believed, leading to its possible experimental observation in real quantum dots.
  • Numerical calculations illustrate the effect of the sign of the next nearest-neighbor hopping term t' on the 2-hole properties of the t-t'-J model. Working mainly on 2-leg ladders, in the -1.0 < t'/t < 1.0 regime, it is shown that introducing t' in the t-J model is equivalent to effectively renormalizing J, namely t' negative (positive) is equivalent to an effective t-J model with smaller (bigger) J. This effect is present even at the level of a 2x2 plaquette toy model, and was observed also in calculations on small square clusters. Analyzing the transition probabilities of a hole-pair in the plaquette toy model, it is argued that the coherent propagation of such hole-pair is enhanced by a constructive interference between both t and t' for t'>0. This interference is destructive for t'<0.
  • We report ^{115}In and ^{59}Co Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements in the heavy fermion superconductor CeCoIn_5 above and below T_c. The hyperfine couplings of the In and Co are anisotropic and exhibit dramatic changes below 50K due to changes in the crystal field level populations of the Ce ions. Below T_c the spin susceptibility is suppressed, indicating singlet pairing.
  • The $T$-dependence (2- 400 K) of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic susceptibility, $\chi (T)$, and specific heat, $C_{v}(T)$, of the $normal$ antiferromagnetic (AFM) spinel ZnCr$_{2}$O$_{4}$ and the spin-glass (SG) Zn$_{1-x}$Cd$_{x}$Cr$_{2}$O$_{4}$ ($x=0.05,0.10$) is reported. These systems behave as a strongly frustrated AFM and SG with $% T_{N}$ $ \approx T_{G}\approx 12$ K and -400 K $\gtrsim \Theta_{CW}\gtrsim -500$ K. At high-$T$ the EPR intensity follows the $\chi (T)$ and the $g$-value is $T$-independent. The linewidth broadens as the temperature is lowered, suggesting the existence of short range AFM correlations in the paramagnetic phase. For ZnCr$_{2}$O$_{4}$ the EPR intensity and $\chi (T)$ decreases below 90 K and 50 K, respectively. These results are discussed in terms of nearest-neighbor Cr$^{3+}$ (S $=3/2$%) spin-coupled pairs with an exchange coupling of $| J/k| \approx $ 50 K. The appearance of small resonance modes for $T\lesssim 17$ K, the observation of a sharp drop in $\chi (T)$ and a strong peak in $C_{v}(T)$ at $T_{N}=12$ K confirms, as previously reported, the existence of long range AFM correlations in the low-$T$ phase. A comparison with recent neutron diffraction experiments that found a near dispersionless excitation at 4.5 meV for $T\lesssim T_{N}$ and a continuous gapless spectrum for $T\gtrsim T_{N}$, is also given.
  • The recently discussed tendency of holes to generate nontrivial spin environments in the extended two-dimensional t-J model (G. Martins, R. Eder, and E. Dagotto, Phys. Rev. B{\bf 60}, R3716 (1999)) is here investigated using computational techniques applied to ladders with several number of legs. This tendency is studied also with the help of analytic spin-polaron approaches directly in two dimensions. Our main result is that the presence of robust antiferromagnetic correlations between spins located at both sides of a hole either along the x or y axis, observed before numerically on square clusters, is also found using ladders, as well as applying techniques based on a string-basis expansion. This so-called "across-the-hole" nontrivial structure exists even in the two-leg spin-gapped ladder system, and leads to an effective reduction in dimensionality and spin-charge separation at short-distances, with a concomitant drastic reduction in the quasiparticle (QP) weight Z. In general, it appears that holes tend to induce one-dimensional-like spin arrangements to improve their mobility. Using ladders it is also shown that the very small J/t$\sim$0.1 regime of the standard t-J model may be more realistic than anticipated in previous investigations, since such regime shares several properties with those found in the extended model at realistic couplings. Another goal of the present article is to provide additional information on the recently discussed tendencies to stripe formation and spin incommensurability reported for the extended t-J model.
  • The hole-doped standard and extended t-J models on ladders with anisotropic Heisenberg interactions are studied computationally in the interval $0.0 \leq \lambda \leq 1.0$ ($\lambda=0$, Ising; $\lambda=1$, Heisenberg). It is shown that the approximately half-doped stripes recently discussed at $\lambda=1$ survive in the anisotropic case ($\lambda$$<$1.0), particularly in the "extended" model. Due to the absence of spin fluctuations in the Ising limit and working in the rung basis, a simple picture emerges in which the stripe structure can be mostly constructed from the solution of the t-J model on chains. A comparison of results in the range $0.0 \leq \lambda \leq 1.0$ suggests that this picture is valid up to the Heisenberg limit.
  • The extended and standard t-J models are computationally studied on ladders and planes, with emphasis on the small J/t region. At couplings compatible with photoemission results for undoped cuprates, half-doped stripes separating $\pi$-shifted antiferromagnetic (AF) domains are found, as in Tranquada's interpretation of neutron experiments. Our main result is that the elementary stripe `"building-block" resembles the properties of $one$ hole at small J/t, with robust AF correlations across-the-hole induced by the local tendency of the charge to separate from the spin (G. Martins {\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. B{\bf 60}, R3716 (1999)). This suggests that the seed of half-doped stripes already exists in the unusual properties of the insulating parent compound.
  • A method is proposed to improve the accuracy of approximate techniques for strongly correlated electrons that use reduced Hilbert spaces. As a first step, the method involves a change of basis that incorporates exactly part of the short distance interactions. The Hamiltonian is rewritten in new variables that better represent the physics of the problem under study. A Hilbert space expansion performed in the new basis follows. The method is successfully tested using both the Heisenberg model and the $t-J$ model with holes on 2-leg ladders and chains, including estimations for ground state energies, static correlations, and spectra of excited states. An important feature of this technique is its ability to calculate dynamical responses on clusters larger than those that can be studied using Exact Diagonalization. The method is applied to the analysis of the dynamical spin structure factor $S(q,\omega)$ on clusters with $2 \times 16$ sites and 0 and 2 holes. Our results confirm previous studies (M. Troyer, H. Tsunetsugu, and T. M. Rice, Phys. Rev. $ B 53$, 251 (1996)) which suggested that the state of the lowest energy in the spin-1 2-holes subspace corresponds to the bound state of a hole pair and a spin-triplet. Implications of this result for neutron scattering experiments both on ladders and planes are discussed.