• We report new near ultraviolet HST/STIS observations of atmospheric absorptions during the planetary transit of HD209458b. We detect absorption in atomic magnesium (MgI), while no signal has been detected in the lines of singly ionized magnesium (MgII). We measure the MgI atmospheric absorption to be 6.2+/-2.9% in the velocity range from -62 to -19 km/s. The detection of atomic magnesium in the planetary upper atmosphere at a distance of several planetary radii gives a first view into the transition region between the thermosphere and the exobase, where atmospheric escape takes place. We estimate the electronic densities needed to compensate for the photo-ionization by dielectronic recombination of Mg+ to be in the range of 10^8-10^9 cm^{-3}. Our finding is in excellent agreement with model predictions at altitudes of several planetary radii. We observe MgI atoms escaping the planet, with a maximum radial velocity (in the stellar rest frame) of -60 km/s. Because magnesium is much heavier than hydrogen, the escape of this species confirms previous studies that the planet's atmosphere is undergoing hydrodynamic escape. We compare our observations to a numerical model that takes the stellar radiation pressure on the MgI atoms into account. We find that the MgI atoms must be present at up to ~7.5 planetari radii altitude and estimate an MgI escape rate of ~3x10^7 g/s. Compared to previous evaluations of the escape rate of HI atoms, this evaluation is compatible with a magnesium abundance roughly solar. A hint of absorption, detected at low level of significance, during the post-transit observations, could be interpreted as a MgI cometary-like tail. If true, the estimate of the absorption by MgI would be increased to a higher value of about 8.8+/-2.1%.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared transmission spectroscopy of the transiting hot-Jupiter HAT-P-1b. We observed one transit with Wide Field Camera 3 using the G141 low-resolution grism to cover the wavelength range 1.087- 1.678 {\mu}m. These time series observations were taken with the newly available spatial scan mode that increases the duty cycle by nearly a factor of two, thus improving the resulting photometric precision of the data. We measure a planet-to-star radius ratio of Rp/R*=0.11709+/-0.00038 in the white light curve with the centre of transit occurring at 2456114.345+/-0.000133 (JD). We achieve S/N levels per exposure of 1840 (0.061%) at a resolution of {\Delta\lambda}=19.2nm (R~70) in the 1.1173 - 1.6549{\mu}m spectral region, providing the precision necessary to probe the transmission spectrum of the planet at close to the resolution limit of the instrument. We compute the transmission spectrum using both single target and differential photometry with similar results. The resultant transmission spectrum shows a significant absorption above the 5-{\sigma} level matching the 1.4{\mu}m water absorption band. In solar composition models, the water absorption is sensitive to the ~1 mbar pressure levels at the terminator. The detected absorption agrees with that predicted by an 1000 K isothermal model, as well as with that predicted by a planetary-averaged temperature model.
  • We present a theoretical model fit to the HST/STIS optical transit transmission spectrum of HD209458b. In our fit, we use the sodium absorption line profile along with the Rayleigh scattering by H_2 to help determine the average temperature-pressure profile at the planetary terminator, and infer the abundances of atomic and molecular species. The observed sodium line profile spans an altitude range of ~3,500 km, corresponding to pressures between ~0.001 and 50 mbar in our atmospheric models. We find that the sodium line profile requires either condensation into sodium sulfide or ionization, necessary to deplete atomic sodium only at high altitudes below pressures of ~3 mbar. The depletion of sodium is supported by an observed sudden abundance change, from 2 times solar abundance in the lower atmosphere to 0.2 solar or lower in the upper atmosphere. Our findings also indicate the presence of a hot atmosphere near stratospheric altitudes corresponding to pressures of 33 mbar, consistent with that of the observed dayside temperature inversion. In addition, we find a separate higher altitude temperature rise is necessary within both the condensation and ionization models, corresponding to pressures below ~0.01 mbar. This hot higher altitude temperature indicates that absorption by atomic sodium can potentially probe the bottom of the thermosphere, and is possibly sensitive to the temperature rise linked to atmospheric escape.
  • We present the transmission spectra of the hot-Jupiter HD209458b taken with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Our analysis combines data at two resolutions and applies a complete pixel-by-pixel limb-darkening correction to fully reveal the spectral line shapes of atmospheric absorption features. Terrestrial-based Na I and H I contamination are identified which mask the strong exoplanetary absorption signature in the Na core, which we find reaches total absorption levels of ~0.11% in a 4.4 Ang band. The Na spectral line profile is characterized by a wide absorption profile at the lowest absorption depths, and a sharp transition to a narrow absorption profile at higher absorption values. The transmission spectra also shows the presence of an additional absorber at ~6,250 Ang, observed at both medium and low resolutions. We performed various limb-darkening tests, including using high precision limb-darkening measurements of the sun to characterize a general trend of Atlas models to slightly overestimate the amount of limb-darkening at all wavelengths, likely due to the limitations of the model's one-dimensional nature. We conclude that, despite these limitations, Atlas models can still successfully model limb-darkening in high signal-to-noise transits of solar-type stars, like HD209458, to a high level of precision over the entire optical regime (3,000-10,000 Ang) at transit phases between 2nd and 3rd contact.