• Here we present deep (16 mumJy), very high (40 mas) angular resolution 1.14 mm, polarimetric, Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations towards the massive protostar driving the HH 80-81 radio jet. The observations clearly resolve the disk oriented perpendicular to the radio jet, with a radius of ~0.171 arcsec (~291 au at 1.7 kpc distance). The continuum brightness temperature, the intensity profile, and the polarization properties clearly indicate that the disk is optically thick for a radius of R<170 au. The linear polarization of the dust emission is detected almost all along the disk and its properties suggest that dust polarization is produced mainly by self-scattering. However, the polarization pattern presents a clear differentiation between the inner (optically thick) part of the disk and the outer (optically thin) region of the disk, with a sharp transition that occurs at a radius of 0.1 arcsec (~170 au). The polarization characteristics of the inner disk suggest that dust settling has not occurred yet with a maximum dust grain size between 50 and 500 mum. The outer part of the disk has a clear azimuthal pattern but with a significantly higher polarization fraction compared to the inner disk. This pattern is broadly consistent with self-scattering of a radiation field that is beamed radially outward, as expected in the optically thin outer region, although contribution from non-spherical grains aligned with respect to the radiative flux cannot be excluded.
  • We present subarcsecond angular resolution observations carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 880 $\mu$m centered at the B0-type protostar GGD27~MM1, the driving source of the parsec scale HH 80-81 jet. We constrain its polarized continuum emission to be $\lesssim0.8\%$ at this wavelength. Its submm spectrum is dominated by sulfur-bearing species tracing a rotating disk--like structure (SO and SO$_2$ isotopologues mainly), but also shows HCN-bearing and CH$_3$OH lines, which trace the disk and the outflow cavity walls excavated by the HH 80-81 jet. The presence of many sulfurated lines could indicate the presence of shocked gas at the disk's centrifugal barrier or that MM1 is a hot core at an evolved stage. The resolved SO$_2$ emission traces very well the disk kinematics and we fit the SMA observations using a thin-disk Keplerian model, which gives the inclination (47$^{\circ}$), the inner ($\lesssim170$ AU) and outer ($\sim950-1300$~AU) radii and the disk's rotation velocity (3.4 km s$^{-1}$ at a putative radius of 1700 AU). We roughly estimate a protostellar dynamical mass of 4-18\msun. MM2 and WMC cores show, comparatively, an almost empty spectra suggesting that they are associated with extended emission detected in previous low-angular resolution observations, and therefore indicating youth (MM2) or the presence of a less massive object (WMC).
  • L1157-B1 is the brightest shocked region of the large-scale molecular outflow, considered the prototype of chemically rich outflows, being the ideal laboratory to study how shocks affect the molecular gas. Several deuterated molecules have been previously detected with the IRAM 30m, most of them formed on grain mantles and then released into the gas phase due to the shock. We aim to observationally investigate the role of the different chemical processes at work that lead to formation the of DCN and test the predictions of the chemical models for its formation. We performed high-angular resolution observations with NOEMA of the DCN(2-1) and H13CN(2-1) lines to compute the deuterated fraction, Dfrac(HCN). We detected emission of DCN(2-1) and H13CN(2-1) arising from L1157-B1 shock. Dfrac(HCN) is ~4x10$^{-3}$ and given the uncertainties, we did not find significant variations across the bow-shock. Contrary to HDCO, whose emission delineates the region of impact between the jet and the ambient material, DCN is more widespread and not limited to the impact region. This is consistent with the idea that gas-phase chemistry is playing a major role in the deuteration of HCN in the head of the bow-shock, where HDCO is undetected as it is a product of grain-surface chemistry. The spectra of DCN and H13CN match the spectral signature of the outflow cavity walls, suggesting that their emission result from shocked gas. The analysis of the time dependent gas-grain chemical model UCL-CHEM coupled with a C-type shock model shows that the observed Dfrac(HCN) is reached during the post-shock phase, matching the dynamical timescale of the shock. Our results indicate that the presence of DCN in L1157-B1 is a combination of gas-phase chemistry that produces the widespread DCN emission, dominating in the head of the bow-shock, and sputtering from grain mantles toward the jet impact region.
  • In the BHR71 region, two low-mass protostars drive two distinguishable outflows. They constitute an ideal laboratory to investigate the effects of shock chemistry and the mechanisms that led to their formation. We aim to define the morphology of the warm gas component of the BHR 71 outflow and at modelling its shocked component. We present the first far infrared Herschel images of the BHR71 outflow in the CO(14-13), H$_2$O (2$_{21}$-1$_{10}$), H$_2$O (2$_{12}$-1$_{01}$) and [OI] 145 $\mu$m, lines, revealing the presence of several knots of warm, shocked gas associated with fast outflowing gas. In two of these knots we performed a detailed study of the physical conditions by comparing a large set of transitions from several molecules to a grid of shock models. Herschel lines ratios in the outflow knots are quite similar, showing that the excitation conditions of the fast moving gas do not change significantly within the first $\sim$ 0.068 pc of the outflow, apart at the extremity of the southern blue-shifted lobe that is expanding outside the molecular cloud. Rotational diagram, spectral line profile and LVG analysis of the CO lines in knot A show the presence of two gas components: one extended, cold ($T\sim$80 K) and dense ($n$(H$_2$) = 3$\times$10$^5$-4$\times$10$^6$ cm$^{-3}$) and another compact (18 arcsec), warm ($T$ = 1700-2200 K) with slightly lower density ($n$(H$_2$) = (2-6)$\times$10$^4$ cm$^{-3}$). In the two brightest knots (where we performed shock modelling) we found that H$_2$ and CO are well fitted with non-stationary (young) shocks. These models, however, significantly underestimate the observed fluxes of [OI] and OH lines, but are not too far off those of H$_2$O, calling for an additional, possibly dissociative, J-type shock component. Our modelling indirectly suggests that an additional shock component exists, possibly a remnant of the primary jet
  • We present observations of the 1.3 mm continuum emission toward hub-N and hub-S of the infrared dark cloud G14.225-0.506 carried out with the Submillimeter Array, together with observations of the dust emission at 870 and 350 microns obtained with APEX and CSO telescopes. The large scale dust emission of both hubs consists of a single peaked clump elongated in the direction of the associated filament. At small scales, the SMA images reveal that both hubs fragment into several dust condensations. The fragmentation level was assessed under the same conditions and we found that hub-N presents 4 fragments while hub-S is more fragmented, with 13 fragments identified. We studied the density structure by means of a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profile at 870 and 350 microns and the spectral energy distribution adopting a Plummer-like function to describe the density structure. The parameters inferred from the model are remarkably similar in both hubs, suggesting that density structure could not be responsible in determining the fragmentation level. We estimated several physical parameters such as the level of turbulence and the magnetic field strength, and we found no significant differences between these hubs. The Jeans analysis indicates that the observed fragmentation is more consistent with thermal Jeans fragmentation compared with a scenario that turbulent support is included. The lower fragmentation level observed in hub-N could be explained in terms of stronger UV radiation effects from a nearby HII region, evolutionary effects, and/or stronger magnetic fields at small scales, a scenario that should be further investigated.
  • J. A. Acosta-Pulido, I. Agudo, A. Alberdi, J. Alcolea, E. J. Alfaro, A. Alonso-Herrero, G. Anglada, P. Arnalte-Mur, Y. Ascasibar, B. Ascaso, R. Azulay, R. Bachiller, A. Baez-Rubio, E. Battaner, J. Blasco, C. B. Brook, V. Bujarrabal, G. Busquet, M. D. Caballero-Garcia, C. Carrasco-Gonzalez, J. Casares, A. J. Castro-Tirado, L. Colina, F. Colomer, I. de Gregorio-Monsalvo, A. del Olmo, J.-F. Desmurs, J. M. Diego, R. Dominguez-Tenreiro, R. Estalella, A. Fernandez-Soto, E. Florido, J. Font, J. A. Font, A. Fuente, R. Garcia-Benito, S. Garcia-Burillo, B. Garcia-Lorenzo, A. Gil de Paz, J. M. Girart, J. R. Goicoechea, J. F. Gomez, M. Gonzalez-Garcia, O. Gonzalez-Martin, J. I. Gonzalez-Serrano, J. Gorgas, J. Gorosabel, A. Guijarro, J. C. Guirado, L. Hernandez-Garcia, C. Hernandez-Monteagudo, D. Herranz, R. Herrero-Illana, Y.-D. Hu, N. Huelamo, M. Huertas-Company, J. Iglesias-Paramo, S. Jeong, I. Jimenez-Serra, J. H. Knapen, R. A. Lineros, U. Lisenfeld, J. M. Marcaide, I. Marquez, J. Marti, J. M. Marti, I. Marti-Vidal, E. Martinez-Gonzalez, J. Martin-Pintado, J. Masegosa, J. M. Mayen-Gijon, M. Mezcua, S. Migliari, P. Mimica, J. Moldon, O. Morata, I. Negueruela, S. R. Oates, M. Osorio, A. Palau, J. M. Paredes, J. Perea, P. G. Perez-Gonzalez, E. Perez-Montero, M. A. Perez-Torres, M. Perucho, S. Planelles, J. A. Pons, A. Prieto, V. Quilis, P. Ramirez-Moreta, C. Ramos Almeida, N. Rea, M. Ribo, M. J. Rioja, J. M. Rodriguez Espinosa, E. Ros, J. A. Rubiño-Martin, B. Ruiz-Granados, J. Sabater, S. Sanchez, C. Sanchez-Contreras, A. Sanchez-Monge, R. Sanchez-Ramirez, A. M. Sintes, J. M. Solanes, C. F. Sopuerta, M. Tafalla, J. C. Tello, B. Tercero, M. C. Toribio, J. M. Torrelles, M. A. P. Torres, A. Usero, L. Verdes-Montenegro, A. Vidal-Garcia, P. Vielva, J. Vilchez, B.-B. Zhang
    June 17, 2015 astro-ph.IM
    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is called to revolutionise essentially all areas of Astrophysics. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be a transformational instrument, and its scientific potential will go beyond the interests of astronomers. Its technological challenges and huge cost requires a multinational effort, and Europe has recognised this by putting the SKA on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The Spanish SKA White Book is the result of the coordinated effort of 120 astronomers from 40 different research centers. The book shows the enormous scientific interest of the Spanish astronomical community in the SKA and warrants an optimum scientific exploitation of the SKA by Spanish researchers, if Spain enters the SKA project.
  • We present a multiline CS survey towards the brightest bow-shock B1 in the prototypical chemically active protostellar outflow L1157. We made use of (sub-)mm data obtained in the framework of the Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star forming regions (CHESS) and Astrochemical Surveys at IRAM (ASAI) key science programs. We detected $^{12}$C$^{32}$S, $^{12}$C$^{34}$S, $^{13}$C$^{32}$S, and $^{12}$C$^{33}$S emissions, for a total of 18 transitions, with $E_{\rm u}$ up to $\sim$ 180 K. The unprecedented sensitivity of the survey allows us to carefully analyse the line profiles, revealing high-velocity emission, up to 20 km s$^{-1}$ with respect to the systemic. The profiles can be well fitted by a combination of two exponential laws that are remarkably similar to what previously found using CO. These components have been related to the cavity walls produced by the $\sim$ 2000 yr B1 shock and the older ($\sim$ 4000 yr) B2 shock, respectively. The combination of low- and high-excitation CS emission was used to properly sample the different physical components expected in a shocked region. Our CS observations show that this molecule is highlighting the dense, $n_{\rm H_2}$ = 1--5 $\times$ 10$^{5}$ cm$^{-3}$, cavity walls produced by the episodic outflow in L1157. In addition, the highest excitation (E$_u$ $\geq$ 130 K) CS lines provide us with the signature of denser (1--5 $\times$ 10$^{6}$ cm$^{-3}$) gas, associated with a molecular reformation zone of a dissociative J-type shock, which is expected to arise where the precessing jet impacting the molecular cavities. The CS fractional abundance increases up to $\sim$ 10$^{-7}$ in all the kinematical components. This value is consistent with what previously found for prototypical protostars and it is in agreement with the prediction of the abundances obtained via the chemical code Astrochem.
  • An ever growing number of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that the deuterated fraction (column density ratio between a species containing D and its hydrogenated counterpart, Dfrac) is an evolutionary indicator both in the low- and the high-mass star formation process. However, the role of surface chemistry in these studies has not been quantified from an observational point of view. In order to compare how the deuterated fractions of species formed only in the gas and partially or uniquely on grain surfaces evolve with time, we observed rotational transitions of CH3OH, 13CH3OH, CH2DOH, CH3OD at 3 and 1.3~mm, and of NH2D at 3~mm with the IRAM-30m telescope, and the inversion transitions (1,1) and (2,2) of NH3 with the GBT, towards most of the cores already observed by Fontani et al.~(2011, 2014) in N2H+, N2D+, HNC, DNC. NH2D is detected in all but two cores, regardless of the evolutionary stage. Dfrac(NH3) is on average above 0.1, and does not change significantly from the earliest to the most evolved phases, although the highest average value is found in the protostellar phase (~0.3). Few lines of CH2DOH and CH3OD are clearly detected, and only towards protostellar cores or externally heated starless cores. This work clearly confirms an expected different evolutionary trend of the species formed exclusively in the gas (N2D+ and N2H+) and those formed partially (NH2D and NH3) or totally (CH2DOH and CH3OH) on grain mantles. The study also reinforces the idea that Dfrac(N2H+) is the best tracer of massive starless cores, while high values of Dfrac(CH3OH) seem rather good tracers of the early protostellar phases, at which the evaporation/sputtering of the grain mantles is most efficient.
  • Observations of molecular clouds reveal a complex structure, with gas and dust often arranged in filamentary rather than spherical geometries. The associations of pre- and proto- stellar cores with the filaments suggest a direct link with the process of star formation. Any study of the properties of such filaments requires a representative samples from different enviroments and so an unbiased detection method. We developed such an approach using the Hessian matrix of a surface-brightness distribution to identify filaments and determine their physical and morphological properties. After testing the method on simulated, but realistic filaments, we apply the algorithms to column-density maps computed from Herschel observations of the Galactic Plane obtained by the Hi-GAL project. We identified ~500 filaments, in the longitude range of l=216.5 to l=225.5, with lengths from ~1 pc up to ~30 pc and widths between 0.1 pc and 2.5 pc. Average column densities are between 10^20 cm^-2 and 10^22 cm^-2. Filaments include the majority of dense material with N_H_2 > 6x10^21cm^-2. We find that the pre- and proto-stellar compact sources already identified in the same region are mostly associated with filaments. However, surface densities in excess of the expected critical values for high-mass star formation are only found on the filaments, indicating that these structures are necessary to channel material into the clumps. Furthermore, we analyze the gravitational stability of filaments and discuss their relationship with star formation.
  • In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 micron (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the Spectral Energy Distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.
  • Molecular outflows powered by young protostars strongly affect the kinematics and chemistry of the natal molecular cloud through strong shocks resulting in substantial modifications of the abundance of several species. As part of the "Chemical Herschel Surveys of Star forming regions" guaranteed time key program, we aim at investigating the physical and chemical conditions of H20 in the brightest shock region B1 of the L1157 molecular outflow. We observed several ortho- and para-H2O transitions using HIFI and PACS instruments on board Herschel, providing a detailed picture of the kinematics and spatial distribution of the gas. We performed a LVG analysis to derive the physical conditions of H2O shocked material, and ultimately obtain its abundance. We detected 13 H2O lines probing a wide range of excitation conditions. PACS maps reveal that H2O traces weak and extended emission associated with the outflow identified also with HIFI in the o-H2O line at 556.9 GHz, and a compact (~10") bright, higher-excitation region. The LVG analysis of H2O lines in the bow-shock show the presence of two gas components with different excitation conditions: a warm (Tkin~200-300 K) and dense (n(H2)~(1-3)x10^6 cm-3) component with an assumed extent of 10" and a compact (~2"-5") and hot, tenuous (Tkin~900-1400 K, n(H2)~10^3-10^4 cm-3) gas component, which is needed to account for the line fluxes of high Eu transitions. The fractional abundance of the warm and hot H2O gas components is estimated to be (0.7-2)x10^{-6} and (1-3)x10^{-4}, respectively. Finally, we identified an additional component in absorption in the HIFI spectra of H2O lines connecting with the ground state level, probably arising from the photodesorption of icy mantles of a water-enriched layer at the edges of the cloud.
  • We present the Herschel Gould Belt survey maps of the L1641 molecular clouds in Orion A. We extracted both the filaments and dense cores in the region. We identified which of dense sources are proto- or pre-stellar, and studied their association with the identified filaments. We find that although most (71%) of the pre-stellar sources are located on filaments there is still a significant fraction of sources not associated with such structures. We find that these two populations (on and off the identified filaments) have distinctly different mass distributions. The mass distribution of the sources on the filaments is found to peak at 4 Solar masses and drives the shape of the CMF at higher masses, which we fit with a power law of the form dN/dlogM \propto M^{-1.4+/-0.4}. The mass distribution of the sources off the filaments, on the other hand, peaks at 0.8 Solar masses and leads to a flattening of the CMF at masses lower than ~4 Solar masses. We postulate that this difference between the mass distributions is due to the higher proportion of gas that is available in the filaments, rather than in the diffuse cloud.
  • We present high spatial resolution (750 AU at 250 pc) maps of the B1 shock in the blue lobe of the L1157 outflow in four lines: CS (3-2), CH3OH (3_K-2_K), HC3N (16-15) and p-H2CO (2_02-3_01). The combined analysis of the morphology and spectral profiles has shown that the highest velocity gas is confined in a few compact (~ 5 arcsec) bullets while the lowest velocity gas traces the wall of the gas cavity excavated by the shock expansion. A large velocity gradient model applied to the CS (3-2) and (2-1) lines provides an upper limit of 10^6 cm^-3 to the averaged gas density in B1 and a range of 5x10^3< n(H2)< 5x10^5 cm^-3 for the density of the high velocity bullets. The origin of the bullets is still uncertain: they could be the result of local instabilities produced by the interaction of the jet with the ambient medium or could be clump already present in the ambient medium that are excited and accelerated by the expanding outflow. The column densities of the observed species can be reproduced qualitatively by the presence in B1 of a C-type shock and only models where the gas reaches temperatures of at least 4000 K can reproduce the observed HC3N column density.
  • We present the first detection of N2H+ towards a low-mass protostellar outflow, namely the L1157-B1 shock, at about 0.1 pc from the protostellar cocoon. The detection was obtained with the IRAM 30-m antenna. We observed emission at 93 GHz due to the J = 1-0 hyperfine lines. The analysis of the emission coupled with the HIFI CHESS multiline CO observations leads to the conclusion that the observed N2H+(1-0) line originates from the dense (> 10^5 cm-3) gas associated with the large (20-25 arcsec) cavities opened by the protostellar wind. We find a N2H+ column density of few 10^12 cm-2 corresponding to an abundance of (2-8) 10^-9. The N2H+ abundance can be matched by a model of quiescent gas evolved for more than 10^4 yr, i.e. for more than the shock kinematical age (about 2000 yr). Modelling of C-shocks confirms that the abundance of N2H+ is not increased by the passage of the shock. In summary, N2H+ is a fossil record of the pre-shock gas, formed when the density of the gas was around 10^4 cm-3, and then further compressed and accelerated by the shock.
  • We study for the first time the complete sub-millimeter spectra (450 GHz to 1550 GHz) of a sample of nearby active galaxies observed with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE/FTS) onboard Herschel. The CO ladder (from Jup = 4 to 12) is the most prominent spectral feature in this range. These CO lines probe warm molecular gas that can be heated by ultraviolet photons, shocks, or X-rays originated in the active galactic nucleus or in young star-forming regions. In these proceedings we investigate the physical origin of the CO emission using the averaged CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) of six Seyfert galaxies. We use a radiative transfer model assuming an isothermal homogeneous medium to estimate the molecular gas conditions. We also compare this CO SLED with the predictions of photon and X-ray dominated region (PDR and XDR) models.
  • The unprecedented sensitivity of Herschel coupled with the high resolution of the HIFI spectrometer permits studies of the intensity-velocity relationship I(v) in molecular outflows, over a higher excitation range than possible up to now. In the course of the CHESS Key Program, we have observed toward the bright bowshock region L1157-B1 the CO rotational transitions between J=5-4 and J=16-15 with HIFI, and the J=1-0, 2-1 and 3-2 with the IRAM-30m and the CSO telescopes. We find that all the line profiles I_{CO}(v) are well fit by a linear combination of three exponential laws exp(-|v/v_0|) with v_0= 12.5, 4.4 and 2.5km/s. The first component dominates the CO emission at J_up > 13, as well as the high-excitation lines of SiO and H2O. The second component dominates for 3 < J_up < 10 and the third one for J_up < 2. We show that these exponentials are the signature of quasi-isothermal shocked gas components: the impact of the jet against the L1157-B1 bowshock (T= 210K), the walls of the outflow cavity associated with B1 (T= 64K) and the older cavity L1157-B2 (T= 23K), respectively. Analysis of the CO line flux in the Large-Velocity Gradient approximation further shows that the emission arises from dense gas (n(H2) > 1e5-1e6 cm-3) close to LTE up to J=20. We find that the CO J=2-1 intensity-velocity relation observed in various other molecular outflows is satisfactorily fit by similar exponential laws, which may hold an important clue to their entrainment process.
  • The Pipe nebula is a massive, nearby, filamentary dark molecular cloud with a low star-formation efficiency threaded by a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to its main axis. It harbors more than a hundred, mostly quiescent, very chemically young starless cores. The cloud is, therefore, a good laboratory to study the earliest stages of the star-formation process. We aim to investigate the primordial conditions and the relation among physical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the evolution of low-mass starless cores. We used the IRAM 30-m telescope to map the 1.2 mm dust continuum emission of five new starless cores, which are in good agreement with previous visual extinction maps. For the sample of nine cores, which includes the four cores studied in a previous work, we derived a Av to NH2 factor of (1.27$\pm$0.12)$\times10^{-21}$ mag cm$^{2}$ and a background visual extinction of ~6.7 mag possibly arising from the cloud material. We derived an average core diameter of ~0.08 pc, density of ~10$^5$ cm$^{-3}$, and mass of ~1.7 Msun. Several trends seem to exist related to increasing core density: (i) diameter seems to shrink, (ii) mass seems to increase, and (iii) chemistry tends to be richer. No correlation is found between the direction of the surrounding diffuse medium magnetic field and the projected orientation of the cores, suggesting that large scale magnetic fields seem to play a secondary role in shaping the cores. The full abstract is available in the pdf.
  • The intermediate- to high-mass star-forming region IRAS 20343+4129 is an excellent laboratory to study the influence of high- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects on nearby starless dense cores, and investigate for possible implications in the clustered star formation process. We present 3 mm observations of continuum and rotational transitions of several molecular species (C2H, c-C3H2, N2H+, NH2D) obtained with the Combined Array for Research in Millimetre-wave Astronomy, as well as 1.3 cm continuum and NH3 observations carried out with the Very Large Array, to reveal the properties of the dense gas. We confirm undoubtedly previous claims of an expanding cavity created by an ultracompact HII region associated with a young B2 zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) star. The dense gas surrounding the cavity is distributed in a filament that seems squeezed in between the cavity and a collimated outflow associated with an intermediate-mass protostar. We have identified 5 millimeter continuum condensations in the filament. All of them show column densities consistent with potentially being the birthplace of intermediate- to high-mass objects. These cores appear different from those observed in low-mass clustered environments in sereval observational aspects (kinematics, temperature, chemical gradients), indicating a strong influence of the most massive and evolved members of the protocluster. We suggest a possible scenario in which the B2 ZAMS star driving the cavity has compressed the surrounding gas, perturbed its properties and induced the star formation in its immediate surroundings.
  • We have mapped at small spatial scales the temperature and the velocity field in the protocluster associated with IRAS 05345+3157, which contains both intermediate-/high-mass protostellar candidates and starless condensations, and is thus an excellent location to investigate the role of massive protostars on protocluster evolution. We observed the ammonia (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions with the VLA. Ammonia is the best thermometer for dense and cold gas, and the observed transitions have critical densities able to trace the kinematics of the intracluster gaseous medium. The ammonia emission is extended and distributed in two filamentary structures. The starless condensations are colder than the star-forming cores, but the gas temperature across the whole protocluster is higher (by a factor of ~1.3-1.5) than that measured typically in both infrared dark clouds and low-mass protoclusters. The non-thermal contribution to the observed line broadening is at least a factor of 2 larger than the expected thermal broadening even in starless condensations, contrary to the close-to-thermal line widths measured in low-mass quiescent dense cores. The NH3-to-N2H+ abundance ratio is greatly enhanced (a factor of 10) in the pre--stellar core candidates, probably due to freeze-out of most molecular species heavier than He. The more massive and evolved objects likely play a dominant role in the physical properties and kinematics of the protocluster. The high level of turbulence and the fact that the measured core masses are larger than the expected thermal Jeans masses indicate that turbulence likely was an important factor in the initial fragmentation of the parental clump.
  • Theory predicts, and observations confirm, that the column density ratio of a molecule containing D to its counterpart containing H can be used as an evolutionary tracer in the low-mass star formation process. Since it remains unclear if the high-mass star formation process is a scaled-up version of the low-mass one, we investigated whether the relation between deuteration and evolution can be applied to the high-mass regime. With the IRAM-30m telescope, we observed rotational transitions of N2D+ and N2H+ and derived the deuterated fraction in 27 cores within massive star-forming regions understood to represent different evolutionary stages of the massive-star formation process. Results. Our results clearly indicate that the abundance of N2D+ is higher at the pre-stellar/cluster stage, then drops during the formation of the protostellar object(s) as in the low-mass regime, remaining relatively constant during the ultra-compact HII region phase. The objects with the highest fractional abundance of N2D+ are starless cores with properties very similar to typical pre-stellar cores of lower mass. The abundance of N2D+ is lower in objects with higher gas temperatures as in the low-mass case but does not seem to depend on gas turbulence. Our results indicate that the N2D+-to-N2H+ column density ratio can be used as an evolutionary indicator in both low- and high-mass star formation, and that the physical conditions influencing the abundance of deuterated species likely evolve similarly during the processes that lead to the formation of both low- and high-mass stars.
  • The deuterium fractionation, Dfrac, has been proposed as an evolutionary indicator in pre-protostellar and protostellar cores of low-mass star-forming regions. We investigate Dfrac, with high angular resolution, in the cluster environment surrounding the UCHII region IRAS 20293+3952. We performed high angular resolution observations with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) of the ortho-NH2D 1_{11}-1_{01} line at 85.926 GHz and compared them with previously reported VLA NH3 data. We detected strong NH2D emission toward the pre-protostellar cores identified in NH3 and dust emission, all located in the vicinity of the UCHII region IRAS 20293+3952. We found high values of Dfrac~0.1-0.8 in all the pre-protostellar cores and low values, Dfrac<0.1, associated with young stellar objects. The high values of Dfrac in pre-protostellar cores could be indicative of evolution, although outflow interactions and UV radiation could also play a role.
  • We observed with the VLA, PdBI, and SMA the centimeter and millimeter continuum, N2H+(1-0), and CO(2-1) emission associated with a dusty cloud harboring a nascent cluster with intermediate-mass protostars. At centimeter wavelengths we found a strong source, tracing a UCHII region, at the eastern edge of the dusty cloud, with a shell-like structure, and with the near-infrared counterpart falling in the center of the shell. This is presumably the most massive source of the forming cluster. About 15'' to the west of the UCHII region and well embedded in the dusty cloud, we detected a strong millimeter source, MM1, associated with centimeter and near-infrared emission. MM1 seems to be driving a prominent high-velocity CO bipolar outflow, and is embedded in a ridge of dense gas traced by N2H+. We estimated that MM1 is an intermediate-mass source in the Class 0/I phase. About 15'' to the south of MM1, and still more deeply embedded in the dusty cloud, we detected a compact millimeter source, MM2, with neither centimeter nor near-infrared emission, but with water maser emission. MM2 is associated with a clump of N2H+, whose kinematics reveal a clear velocity gradient and additionally we found signposts of infall motions. MM2, being deeply embedded within the dusty cloud, with an associated water maser but no hints of CO outflow emission, is an intriguing object, presumably of intermediate mass. In conclusion, the UCHII region is found at the border of a dusty cloud which is currently undergoing active star formation. Two intermediate-mass protostars in the dusty cloud seem to have formed after the UCHII region and have different properties related to the outflow phenomenon.
  • We aim at studying with high angular resolution a dense core associated with a low-luminosity IRAS source, IRAS 00213+6530, in order to investigate whether low mass star formation is really taking place in isolation. We performed observations at 1.2mm with the IRAM 30m telescope, VLA observations at 6cm, 3.6cm, 1.3cm, 7mm, and H2O maser and NH3 lines, and observations with the NASA 70m antenna in CCS and H2O maser. The cm and mm continuum emission, together with the near infrared data from the 2MASS allowed us to identify 3 YSOs, IRS1, VLA8A, and VLA8B, with different radio and infrared properties, and which seem to be in different evolutionary stages. The NH3 emission consists of three clouds. Two of these, MM1 and MM2, are associated with dust emission, while the southern cloud is only detected in NH3. The YSOs are embedded in MM1, where we found evidence of line broadening and temperature enhancements. On the other hand, the southern cloud and MM2 appear to be quiescent and starless. We modeled the radial intensity profile at 1.2mm of MM1. The model fits reasonably well the data, but it underestimates the intensity at small projected distances from the 1.2mm peak, probably due to the presence of multiple YSOs embedded in the envelope. There is a differentiation in the relative NH3 abundance with low values, ~2x10^-8, toward MM1, and high values, up to 10^-6, toward the southern cloud and MM2, suggesting that these clouds could be in a young evolutionary stage. IRAS 00213+6530 is harboring a multiple system of low-mass protostars, indicating that star formation in this cloud is taking place in groups, rather than in isolation. The low-mass YSOs found in IRAS 00213+6530 are in different evolutionary stages suggesting that star formation is taking place in different episodes.