• This paper presents a study of circumstellar debris around Sun-like stars using data from the Herschel DEBRIS Key Programme. DEBRIS is an unbiased survey comprising the nearest ~90 stars of each spectral type A-M. Analysis of the 275 F-K stars shows that excess emission from a debris disc was detected around 47 stars, giving a detection rate of 17.1+2.6-2.3 per cent, with lower rates for later spectral types. For each target a blackbody spectrum was fitted to the dust emission to determine its fractional luminosity and temperature. The derived under- lying distribution of fractional luminosity versus blackbody radius in the population showed that most detected discs are concentrated at f ~ 10^-5 and at temperatures corresponding to blackbody radii 7-40 AU, which scales to ~40 AU for realistic dust properties (similar to the current Kuiper belt). Two outlying populations are also evident; five stars have exceptionally bright emission ( f > 5x10^-5), and one has unusually hot dust < 4 AU. The excess emission distributions at all wavelengths were fitted with a steady-state evolution model, showing these are compatible with all stars being born with a narrow belt that then undergoes collisional grinding. However, the model cannot explain the hot dust systems - likely originating in transient events - and bright emission systems - arising potentially from atypically massive discs or recent stirring. The emission from the present-day Kuiper belt is predicted to be close to the median of the population, suggesting that half of stars have either depleted their Kuiper belts (similar to the Solar System), or had a lower planetesimal formation efficiency.
  • A suite of science instruments is critical to any high contrast imaging facility, as it defines the science capabilities and observing modes available. SCExAO uses a modular approach which allows for state-of-the-art visitor modules to be tested within an observatory environment on an 8-m class telescope. This allows for rapid prototyping of new and innovative imaging techniques that otherwise take much longer in traditional instrument design. With the aim of maturing science modules for an advanced high contrast imager on an giant segmented mirror telescopes (GSMTs) that will be capable of imaging terrestrial planets, we offer an overview and status update on the various science modules currently under test within the SCExAO instrument.
  • Accurate measurements of the physical structure of protoplanetary discs are critical inputs for planet formation models. These constraints are traditionally established via complex modelling of continuum and line observations. Instead, we present an empirical framework to locate the CO isotopologue emitting surfaces from high spectral and spatial resolution ALMA observations. We apply this framework to the disc surrounding IM Lupi, where we report the first direct, i.e. model independent, measurements of the radial and vertical gradients of temperature and velocity in a protoplanetary disc. The measured disc structure is consistent with an irradiated self-similar disc structure, where the temperature increases and the velocity decreases towards the disc surface. We also directly map the vertical CO snow line, which is located at about one gas scale height at radii between 150 and 300 au, with a CO freeze-out temperature of $21\pm2$ K. In the outer disc ($> 300$ au), where the gas surface density transitions from a power law to an exponential taper, the velocity rotation field becomes significantly sub-Keplerian, in agreement with the expected steeper pressure gradient. The sub-Keplerian velocities should result in a very efficient inward migration of large dust grains, explaining the lack of millimetre continuum emission outside of 300 au. The sub-Keplerian motions may also be the signature of the base of an externally irradiated photo-evaporative wind. In the same outer region, the measured CO temperature above the snow line decreases to $\approx$ 15 K because of the reduced gas density, which can result in a lower CO freeze-out temperature, photo-desorption, or deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium.
  • Recent ALMA observations present mounting evidence for the presence of exocometary gas released within Kuiper belt analogues around nearby main sequence stars. This represents a unique opportunity to study their ice reservoir at the younger ages when volatile delivery to planets is most likely to occur. We here present the detection of CO J=2-1 emission co-located with dust emission from the cometary belt in the 440 Myr-old Fomalhaut system. Through spectro-spatial filtering, we achieve a 5.4$\sigma$ detection and determine that the ring's sky-projected rotation axis matches that of the star. The CO mass derived ($0.65-42 \times10^{-7}$ M$_{\oplus}$) is the lowest of any circumstellar disk detected to date, and must be of exocometary origin. Using a steady state model, we estimate the CO+CO$_2$ mass fraction of exocomets around Fomalhaut to be between 4.6-76%, consistent with Solar System comets and the two other belts known to host exocometary gas. This is the first indication of a similarity in cometary compositions across planetary systems that may be linked to their formation scenario and is consistent with direct ISM inheritance. In addition, we find tentative evidence that $(49\pm 27)$% of the detected flux originates from a region near the eccentric belt's pericentre. If confirmed, the latter may be explained through a recent impact event or CO pericentre glow due to exocometary release within a steady state collisional cascade. In the latter scenario, we show how the azimuthal dependence of the CO release rate leads to asymmetries in gas observations of eccentric exocometary belts.
  • While most of the known debris discs present cold dust at tens of AU, a few young systems exhibit hot dust analogous to the Zodiacal dust. $\eta$ Corvi is particularly interesting as it is old and it has both, with its hot dust significantly exceeding the maximum luminosity of an in-situ collisional cascade. Previous work suggested that this system could be undergoing an event similar to the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) soon after or during a dynamical instability. Here we present ALMA observations of $\eta$ Corvi with a resolution of 1."2 (~22au) to study its outer belt. The continuum emission is consistent with an axisymmetric belt, with a mean radius of 152au and radial FWHM of 46au, which is too narrow compared to models of inward scattering of an LHB-like scenario. Instead, the hot dust could be explained as material passed inwards in a rather stable planetary configuration. We also report a 4sigma detection of CO at ~ 20au. CO could be released in situ from icy planetesimals being passed in when crossing the H$_2$O or CO$_2$ ice lines. Finally, we place constraints on hidden planets in the disc. If a planet is sculpting the disc's inner edge, this should be orbiting at 75-100au, with a mass of 3-30 M$_\oplus$ and an eccentricity < 0.08. Such a planet would be able to clear its chaotic zone on a timescale shorter than the age of the system and scatter material inwards from the outer belt to the inner regions, thus feeding the hot dust.
  • Z CMa is a complex pre-main sequence binary with a current separation of 100 mas, known to consist of an FU Orionis star (SE component) and an embedded Herbig Be star (NW component). Immediately when the late-2008 outburst of Z CMa was announced to the community, we initiated a high angular resolution imaging campaign with VLT/NaCo, Keck/NIRC2, VLT/SINFONI, and Keck/OSIRIS which aimed at characterizing the outburst of both components of the system in the near-infrared. We confirm that the NW star dominates the system flux in the 1.1-3.8 microns range and is responsible for the photometric outburst. We extract the first medium-resolution (R=2000-4000) near-infrared (1.1-2.4 microns) spectra of the individual components during and after the outburst. The SE component has a spectrum typical of FU Orionis objects. The NW component spectrum is characteristic of embedded outbursting protostars and EX Or objects. It displays numerous emission lines during the outburst whose intensity correlates with the system activity. In particular, we find a correlation between the Brackett gamma equivalent width and the system brightness. The bluing of the continuum of the NW component along with the absolute flux and color-variation of the system during the outburst suggests that the outburst was caused by a complex interplay between a variation of the extinction in the line of sight of the NW component on one hand, and the emission of shocked regions close to the NW component on the other. We confirm the recently reported wiggling of the SE component jet from [Fe II] line emission. We find a point-like structure associated with a peak emission at 2.098 microns coincidental with the clump or arm seen in broadband polarization differential imaging as well as additional diffuse emission along a PA=214 degrees. The origin of these two structures is unclear and deserves further investigation.
  • Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks with opacity gaps/cavities in their dust distribution, a feature that may be linked to planet formation. We perform Bayesian modeling of the three transitional disks SZ Cha, CS Cha and T25 including photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory to quantify the improvements added by these new data. We find disk dust masses between 2x10^-5 and 4x10^-4 Msun, and gap radii in the range of 7-18 AU, with uncertainties of ~ one order of magnitude and ~ 4 AU, respectively. Our results show that adding Herschel data can significantly improve these estimates with respect to mid-infrared data alone, which have roughly twice as large uncertainties on both disk mass and gap radius. We also find weak evidence for different density profiles with respect to full disks. These results open exciting new possibilities to study the distribution of disk masses for large samples of disks.
  • Directly detecting thermal emission from young extrasolar planets allows measurement of their atmospheric composition and luminosity, which is influenced by their formation mechanism. Using the Gemini Planet Imager, we discovered a planet orbiting the \$sim$20 Myr-old star 51 Eridani at a projected separation of 13 astronomical units. Near-infrared observations show a spectrum with strong methane and water vapor absorption. Modeling of the spectra and photometry yields a luminosity of L/LS=1.6-4.0 x 10-6 and an effective temperature of 600-750 K. For this age and luminosity, "hot-start" formation models indicate a mass twice that of Jupiter. This planet also has a sufficiently low luminosity to be consistent with the "cold- start" core accretion process that may have formed Jupiter.
  • The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) instrument is a multipurpose high-contrast imaging platform designed for the discovery and detailed characterization of exoplanetary systems and serves as a testbed for high-contrast imaging technologies for ELTs. It is a multi-band instrument which makes use of light from 600 to 2500nm allowing for coronagraphic direct exoplanet imaging of the inner 3 lambda/D from the stellar host. Wavefront sensing and control are key to the operation of SCExAO. A partial correction of low-order modes is provided by Subaru's facility adaptive optics system with the final correction, including high-order modes, implemented downstream by a combination of a visible pyramid wavefront sensor and a 2000-element deformable mirror. The well corrected NIR (y-K bands) wavefronts can then be injected into any of the available coronagraphs, including but not limited to the phase induced amplitude apodization and the vector vortex coronagraphs, both of which offer an inner working angle as low as 1 lambda/D. Non-common path, low-order aberrations are sensed with a coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor in the infrared (IR). Low noise, high frame rate, NIR detectors allow for active speckle nulling and coherent differential imaging, while the HAWAII 2RG detector in the HiCIAO imager and/or the CHARIS integral field spectrograph (from mid 2016) can take deeper exposures and/or perform angular, spectral and polarimetric differential imaging. Science in the visible is provided by two interferometric modules: VAMPIRES and FIRST, which enable sub-diffraction limited imaging in the visible region with polarimetric and spectroscopic capabilities respectively. We describe the instrument in detail and present preliminary results both on-sky and in the laboratory.
  • The study of the planet-debris disk connection can shed light on the formation and evolution of planetary systems, and may help predict the presence of planets around stars with certain disk characteristics. In preliminary analyses of the Herschel DEBRIS and DUNES surveys, Wyatt et al. (2012) and Marshall et al. (2014) identified a tentative correlation between debris and low-mass planets. Here we use the cleanest possible sample out these surveys to assess the presence of such a correlation, discarding stars without known ages, with ages < 1 Gyr and with binary companions <100 AU, to rule out possible correlations due to effects other than planet presence. In our sample of 204 FGK stars, we do not find evidence that debris disks are more common or more dusty around stars harboring high-mass or low-mass planets compared to a control sample without identified planets, nor that debris disks are more or less common (or more or less dusty) around stars harboring multiple planets compared to single-planet systems. Diverse dynamical histories may account for the lack of correlations. The data show the correlation between the presence of high-mass planets and stellar metallicity, but no correlation between the presence of low-mass planets or debris and stellar metallicity. Comparing the observed cumulative distribution of fractional luminosity to those expected from a Gaussian distribution, we find that a distribution centered on the Solar system's value fits well the data, while one centered at 10 times this value can be rejected. This is of interest in the context of future terrestrial planet characterization because it indicates that there are good prospects for finding a large number of debris disk systems (i.e. with evidence of harboring the building blocks of planets) with exozodiacal emission low enough to be appropriate targets for an ATLAST-type mission to search for biosignatures.
  • In this paper we investigate the origin of the mid-infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines for a sample of 114 disks in different evolutionary stages (full, transitional and debris disks) collected from the {\it Spitzer} archive. We focus on the two brighter {H~{\sc i}} lines observed in the {\it Spitzer} spectra, the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) at 12.37$\mu$m and the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7) at 11.32$\mu$m. We detect the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line in 46 objects, and the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7) in 11. We compare these lines with the other most common gas line detected in {\it Spitzer} spectra, the {[Ne~{\sc iii}]} at 12.81$\mu$m. We argue that it is unlikely that the {H~{\sc i}} emission originates from the photoevaporating upper surface layers of the disk, as has been found for the {[Ne~{\sc iii}]} lines toward low-accreting stars. Using the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7)/{H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line ratios we find these gas lines are likely probing gas with hydrogen column densities of 10$^{10}$-10$^{11}$~cm$^{-3}$. The subsample of objects surrounded by full and transitional disks show a positive correlation between the accretion luminosity and the {H~{\sc i}} line luminosity. These two results suggest that the observed mid-IR {H~{\sc i}} lines trace gas accreting onto the star in the same way as other hydrogen recombination lines at shorter wavelengths. A pure chromospheric origin of these lines can be excluded for the vast majority of full and transitional disks.We report for the first time the detection of the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line in eight young (< 20~Myr) debris disks. A pure chromospheric origin cannot be ruled out in these objects. If the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line traces accretion in these older systems, as in the case of full and transitional disks, the strength of the emission implies accretion rates lower than 10$^{-10}$M$_{\odot}$/yr. We discuss some advantages of extending accretion indicators to longer wavelengths.
  • Context. Debris discs are thought to be formed through the collisional grinding of planetesimals, and can be considered as the outcome of planet formation. Understanding the properties of gas and dust in debris discs can help us to comprehend the architecture of extrasolar planetary systems. Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared (IR) photometry and spectroscopy have provided a valuable dataset for the study of debris discs gas and dust composition. This paper is part of a series of papers devoted to the study of Herschel PACS observations of young stellar associations. Aims. This work aims at studying the properties of discs in the Beta Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG) through far-IR PACS observations of dust and gas. Methods. We obtained Herschel-PACS far-IR photometric observations at 70, 100 and 160 microns of 19 BPMG members, together with spectroscopic observations of four of them. Spectroscopic observations were centred at 63.18 microns and 157 microns, aiming to detect [OI] and [CII] emission. We incorporated the new far-IR observations in the SED of BPMG members and fitted modified blackbody models to better characterise the dust content. Results. We have detected far-IR excess emission toward nine BPMG members, including the first detection of an IR excess toward HD 29391.The star HD 172555, shows [OI] emission, while HD 181296, shows [CII] emission, expanding the short list of debris discs with a gas detection. No debris disc in BPMG is detected in both [OI] and [CII]. The discs show dust temperatures in the range 55 to 264 K, with low dust masses (6.6*10^{-5} MEarth to 0.2 MEarth) and radii from blackbody models in the range 3 to 82 AU. All the objects with a gas detection are early spectral type stars with a hot dust component.
  • Asteroids with satellites are natural laboratories to constrain the formation and evolution of our solar system. The binary Trojan asteroid (624) Hektor is the only known Trojan asteroid to possess a small satellite. Based on W.M. Keck adaptive optics observations, we found a unique and stable orbital solution, which is uncommon in comparison to the orbits of other large multiple asteroid systems studied so far. From lightcurve observations recorded since 1957, we showed that because the large Req=125-km primary may be made of two joint lobes, the moon could be ejecta of the low-velocity encounter, which formed the system. The inferred density of Hektor's system is comparable to the L5 Trojan doublet (617) Patroclus but due to their difference in physical properties and in reflectance spectra, both captured Trojan asteroids could have a different composition and origin.
  • We present far-infrared and sub-millimeter images of the eta Crv debris disk system obtained with Herschel and SCUBA-2, as well as Hubble Space Telescope visible and near-infrared coronagraphic images. In the 70 micron Herschel image, we clearly separate the thermal emission from the warm and cold belts in the system, find no evidence for a putative dust population located between them, and precisely determine the geometry of the outer belt. We also find marginal evidence for azimuthal asymmetries and a global offset of the outer debris ring relative to the central star. Finally, we place stringent upper limits on the scattered light surface brightness of the outer ring. Using radiative transfer modeling, we find that it is impossible to account for all observed properties of the system under the assumption that both rings contain dust populations with the same properties. While the outer belt is in reasonable agreement with the expectations of steady-state collisional cascade models, albeit with a minimum grain size that is four times larger than the blow-out size, the inner belt appears to contain copious amounts of small dust grains, possibly below the blow-out size. This suggests that the inner belt cannot result from a simple transport of grains from the outer belt and rather supports a more violent phenomenon as its origin. We also find that the emission from the inner belt has not declined over three decades, a much longer timescale than its dynamical timescale, which indicates that the belt is efficiently replenished.
  • Energies and spectroscopic factors of the first $7/2^-$, $3/2^-$, $1/2^-$ and $5/2^-$ states in the $^{35}$Si$_{21}$ nucleus were determined by means of the (d,p) transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at GANIL using the MUST2 and EXOGAM detectors. By comparing the spectroscopic information on the $^{35}$Si and $^{37}$S isotones, a reduction of the $p_{3/2} - p_{1/2}$ spin-orbit splitting by about 25% is proposed, while the $f_{7/2} -f_{5/2}$ spin-orbit splitting seems to remain constant. These features, derived after having unfolded nuclear correlations using shell model calculations, have been attributed to the properties of the 2-body spin-orbit interaction, the amplitude of which is derived for the first time in an atomic nucleus. The present results, remarkably well reproduced by using several realistic nucleon-nucleon forces, provide a unique touchstone for the modeling of the spin-orbit interaction in atomic nuclei.
  • Fomalhaut is one of the most interesting and well studied nearby stars, hosting at least one planet, a spectacular debris ring, and two distant low-mass stellar companions (TW PsA and LP 876-10, a.k.a. Fomalhaut B & C). We observed both companions with Herschel, and while no disc was detected around the secondary, TW PsA, we have discovered the second debris disc in the Fomalhaut system, around LP 876-10. This detection is only the second case of two debris discs seen in a multiple system, both of which are relatively wide ($\gtrsim$3000 AU for HD 223352/40 and 158 kAU [0.77 pc] for Fomalhaut/LP 876-10). The disc is cool (24K) and relatively bright, with a fractional luminosity $L_{\rm disc}/L_\star = 1.2 \times 10^{-4}$, and represents the rare observation of a debris disc around an M dwarf. Further work should attempt to find if the presence of two discs in the Fomalhaut system is coincidental, perhaps simply due to the relatively young system age of 440 Myr, or if the stellar components have dynamically interacted and the system is even more complex than it currently appears.
  • The 124-131Te nuclei have been produced as fission fragments in two fusion reactions induced by heavy-ions (12C + 238U at 90 MeV bombarding energy and 18O + 208Pb at 85 MeV) and studied with the Euroball array. Their high-spin level schemes have been extended to higher excitation energy from the triple gamma-ray coincidence data. The gamma-gamma angular correlations have been analyzed in order to assign spin and parity values to many observed states. Moreover the half-lives of isomeric states have been measured from the delayed coincidences between the fission-fragment detector SAPhIR and Euroball, as well as from the timing information of the Ge detectors. The behaviors of the yrast structures identified in the present work are first discussed in comparison with the general features known in the mass region, particularly the breakings of neutron pairs occupying the nuh11/2 orbit identified in the neighboring Sn nuclei. The experimental level schemes are then compared to shell-model calculations performed in this work. The analysis of the wave functions shows the effects of the proton-pair breaking along the yrast lines of the heavy Te isotopes.
  • We present the various science cases for building Band 1 receivers as part of ALMA's ongoing Development Program. We describe the new frequency range for Band 1 of 35-52 GHz, a range chosen to maximize the receiver suite's scientific impact. We first describe two key science drivers: 1) the evolution of grains in protoplanetary disks and debris disks, and 2) molecular gas in galaxies during the era of re-ionization. Studies of these topics with Band 1 receivers will significantly expand ALMA's Level 1 Science Goals. In addition, we describe a host of other exciting continuum and line science cases that require ALMA's high sensitivity and angular resolution. For example, ALMA Band 1 continuum data will probe the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect in galaxy clusters, Very Small Grains and spinning dust, ionized jets from young stars, spatial and flaring studies of Sgr A*, the acceleration sites of solar flares, pulsar wind nebulae, radio supernovae, and X-ray binaries. Furthermore, ALMA Band 1 line data will probe chemical differentiation in cloud cores, complex carbon chain molecules, extragalactic radio recombination lines, masers, magnetic fields through Zeeman effect measurements, molecular outflows from young stars, the co-evolution of star formation and active galactic nuclei, and the molecular content of galaxies at z ~ 3. ALMA provides similar to better sensitivities than the JVLA over 35-50 GHz, with differences increasing with frequency. ALMA's smaller antennas and shorter baselines, greater number of baselines, and single-dish capabilities, however, give it a significant edge for observing extended emission, making wide-field maps (mosaics), or attaining high image fidelity, as required by the described science cases.
  • FIRST is a prototype instrument built to demonstrate the capabilities of the pupil remapping technique, using single-mode fibers and working at visible wavelengths. We report on observations of the binary system Capella at three epochs over a period of 14 months with FIRST-18 (that recombines 2 sets of 9 fibers) mounted on the 3-m Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. The binary separation during our observations ranges from 0.8 to 1.2 times the diffraction limit of the telescope at the central wavelength. We successfully resolved the Capella binary system with an astrometric precision as good as 1mas under the best observing conditions. FIRST also gives access to the spectral flux ratio between the two components directly measured with an unprecedented spectral resolution (around 300) over the 600-850nm range. In particular, our data allow to detect the well-known overall slope of the flux ratio spectrum, leading to an estimation of the pivot wavelength of 0.64+/-0.01um, at which the cooler component becomes the brightest. Spectral features arising from the difference in effective temperature (specifically the Halpha line, TiO and CN bands) have been used to constrain the stellar parameters. The effective temperatures we derive for both components are slightly lower (5-7%) than the well-established properties for this system. This difference mainly originates from deeper molecular features than those predicted by state-of-the-art stellar atmospheric models, suggesting that molecular line lists used in the photospheric models are incomplete and/or oscillator strengths are underestimated (most likely concerning the CN molecule). These results demonstrate the power of FIRST, a fibered pupil remapping based instrument, in terms of high angular resolution and show that the direct measurement of the spectral flux ratio provides valuable information to characterize little known companions.
  • Many nearby main-sequence stars have been searched for debris using the far-infrared Herschel satellite, within the DEBRIS, DUNES and Guaranteed-Time Key Projects. We discuss here 11 stars of spectral types A to M where the stellar inclination is known and can be compared to that of the spatially-resolved dust belts. The discs are found to be well aligned with the stellar equators, as in the case of the Sun's Kuiper belt, and unlike many close-in planets seen in transit surveys. The ensemble of stars here can be fitted with a star-disc tilt of ~<10 degrees. These results suggest that proposed mechanisms for tilting the star or disc in fact operate rarely. A few systems also host imaged planets, whose orbits at tens of AU are aligned with the debris discs, contrary to what might be expected in models where external perturbers induce tilts.
  • The high-spin states of the two neutron-rich nuclei, 88Kr and 89R have been studied from the 18O + 208Pb fusion-fission reaction. Their level schemes were built from triple gamma-ray coincidence data and gamma-gamma angular correlations were analyzed in order to assign spin and parity values to most of the observed states. The two levels schemes evolve from collective structures to single-particle excitations as a function of the excitation energy. Comparison with results of shell-model calculations gives the specific proton and neutron configurations which are involved to generate the angular momentum along the yrast lines.
  • Our general understanding of multiple star and planet formation is primarily based on observations of young multiple systems in low density regions like Tau-Aur and Oph. Since many, if not most, of the stars are born in clusters, observational constraints from young binaries in those environments are fundamental for understanding both the formation of multiple systems and planets in multiple systems throughout the Galaxy. We build upon the largest survey for young binaries in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) which is based on Hubble Space Telescope observations to derive both stellar and circumstellar properties of newborn binary systems in this cluster environment. We present Adaptive Optics spatially-resolved JHKL'-band photometry and K-band R$\sim$\,5000 spectra for a sample of 8 ONC binary systems from this database. We characterize the stellar properties of binary components and obtain a census of protoplanetary disks through K-L' color excess. For a combined sample of ONC binaries including 7 additional systems with NIR spectroscopy from the literature, we derive mass ratio and relative age distributions. We compare the stellar and circumstellar properties of binaries in ONC with those in Tau-Aur and Oph from samples of binaries with stellar properties derived for each component from spectra and/or visual photometry and with a disk census obtained through K-L color excess. The mass ratio distribution of ONC binaries is found to be indistinguishable from that of Tau-Aur and, to some extent, to that of Oph in the separation range 85-560\,AU and for primary mass in the range 0.15 to 0.8\,M$_{\sun}$.A trend toward a lower mass ratio with larger separation is suggested in ONC binaries which is not seen in Tau-Aur binaries.The components of ONC binaries are found to be significantly more coeval than the overall ONC population and as coeval as components of binaries in Tau-Aur and Oph[...]
  • We present the first high-angular resolution survey for multiple systems among very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the Hyades open cluster. Using the Keck\,II adaptive optics system, we observed a complete sample of 16 objects with estimated masses $\lesssim$0.1 Msun. We have identified three close binaries with projected separation $\lesssim$0.11", or $\lesssim$5 AU. A number of wide, mostly faint candidate companions are also detected in our images, most of which are revealed as unrelated background sources based on astrometric and/or photometric considerations. The derived multiplicity frequency, 19+13/-6 % over the 2-350 AU range, and the rarity of systems wider than 10 AU are both consistent with observations of field very low-mass objects. In the limited 3-50 AU separation range, the companion frequency is essentially constant from brown dwarfs to solar-type stars in the Hyades cluster, which is also in line with our current knowledge for field stars. Combining the binaries discovered in this surveys with those already known in the Pleiades cluster reveals that very low-mass binaries in open clusters, as well as in star-forming regions, are skewed toward lower mass ratios ($0.6 \lesssim q \lesssim 0.8$) than are their field counterparts, a result that cannot be accounted for by selection effects. Although the possibility of severe systematic errors in model-based mass estimates for very low-mass stars cannot be completely excluded, it is unlikely to explain this difference. We speculate that this trend indicates that surveys among very low-mass field stars may have missed a substantial population of intermediate mass ratio systems, implying that these systems are more common and more diverse than previously thought.
  • GASPS is a far-infrared line and continuum survey of protoplanetary and young debris disks using PACS on the Herschel Space Observatory. The survey includes [OI] at 63 microns, as well as 70, 100 and 160um continuum, with the brightest objects also studied in [OI]145um, [CII]157um, H2O and CO. Targets included T Tauri stars and debris disks in 7 nearby young associations, and a sample of isolated Herbig AeBe stars. The aim was to study the global gas and dust content in a wide disk sample, systemically comparing the results with models. In this paper we review the main aims, target selection and observing strategy. We show initial results, including line identifications, sources detected, and a first statistical study. [OI]63um was the brightest line in most objects, by a factor of ~10. Detection rates were 49%, including 100% of HAeBe stars and 43% of T Tauri stars. Comparison with published dust masses show a dust threshold for [OI]63um detection of ~1e-5 M_solar. Normalising to 140pc distance, 32% with mass 1e-6 - 1e-5 M_solar, and a small number with lower mass were also detected. This is consistent with moderate UV excess and disk flaring. In most cases, continuum and line emission is spatially and spectrally unresolved, suggesting disk emission. ~10 objects were resolved, likely from outflows. Detection rates in [OI]145um, [CII]157um and CO J=18-17 were 20-40%, but [CII] was not correlated with disk mass, suggesting it arises instead from a compact envelope. [OI] detection rates in T Tauri associations of ages 0.3-4Myr were ~50%. ~2 stars were detectable in associations of 5-20Myr, with no detections in associations of age >20Myr. Comparing with the total number of young stars, and assuming a ISM-like gas/dust ratio, this indicates that ~18% of stars retain a gas-rich disk of total mass >1M_Jupiter for 1-4Myr, 1-7% keep such disks for 5-10Myr, and none remain beyond 10-20Myr.
  • Context. Circumstellar discs are the places where planets form, therefore knowledge of their evolution is crucial for our understanding of planet formation. The Herschel Space Observatory is providing valuable data for studying disc systems, thanks to its sensitivity and wavelength coverage. This paper is one of several devoted to analysing and modelling Herschel-PACS observations of various young stellar associations from the GASPS Open Time Key Programme. Aims. The aim of this paper is to elucidate the gas and dust properties of circumstellar discs in the 10 Myr TW Hya Association (TWA) using new far-infrared (IR) imaging and spectroscopy from Herschel-PACS. Methods. We obtained far-IR photometric data at 70, 100, and 160 microns of 14 TWA members; spectroscopic observations centred on the [OI] line at 63.18 microns were also obtained for 9 of the 14. The new photometry for each star was incorporated into its full spectral energy distribution (SED). Results. We detected excess IR emission that is characteristic of circumstellar discs from five TWA members, and computed upper limits for another nine. Two TWA members (TWA 01 and TWA 04B) also show [OI] emission at 63.18 microns. Discs in the TWA association display a variety of properties, with a wide range of dust masses and inner radii, based on modified blackbody modelling. Both transitional and debris discs are found in the sample. Models for sources with a detected IR excess give dust masses in the range from 0.15 Msun to 63 Msun.