• We report $^{75}$As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) / nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies on LaFeAsO$_{1-x}$F$_{x}$. There are two superconducting domes in this material. The first one appears at 0.03 $\leq$ $x$ $\leq$ 0.2 with $T_{\rm c}$$^{max}$ = 27 K, and the second one at 0.25 $\leq$ $x$ $\leq$ 0.75 with $T_{\rm c}$$^{max}$ = 30 K. By NMR and TEM, we demonstrate that a $C4$-to-$C2$ structural phase transition (SPT) takes place above both domes, with the transition temperature $T_{\rm s}$ varying strongly with $x$. In the first dome, the SPT is followed by an antiferromagnetic (AF) transition, but neither AF order nor low-energy spin fluctuations are found in the second dome. In LaFeAsO$_{0.97}$F$_{0.03}$, we find that AF order and superconductivity coexist microscopically via $^{75}$As nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/$T_1$) measurements. In the coexisting region, 1/$T_1$ decreases at $T_{\rm c}$ but becomes to be proportional to $T$ below 0.6$T_{\rm c}$, indicating gapless excitations. Therefore, in contrast to the early reports, the obtained phase diagram for $x \leq$ 0.2 is quite similar to the doped BaFe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ system. The electrical resistivity in the second dome can be fitted by $\rho = {{\rho }_{0}}+A{{T}^{n}}$ with $n$ = 1 and a maximal coefficient $A$ at around $x_{opt}$ = 0.5$\sim$0.55 where $T_{\rm s}$ extrapolates to zero and $T_{\rm c}$ is the maximal, which suggest the importance of quantum critical fluctuations associated with the SPT. We have constructed a complete phase diagram of LaFeAsO$_{1-x}$F$_{x}$, which provides insight into the relationship between SPT, antiferromagnetism and superconductivity.
  • We report the first experimental results of the magnetoresistance, Hall effect, and quantum Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations on single crystals of ZrTe, which was recently predicted to be a new type of topological semimetal hosting both triply degenerate crossing points and Weyl fermion state. The analysis of Hall effect and quantum oscillations indicate that ZrTe is a multiband system with low carrier density, high carrier mobility, small cross-sectional area of Fermi surface, and light cyclotron effective mass, as observed in many topological semimetals. Meanwhile, the angular dependence of the magnetoresistance and the quantum-oscillation frequencies further suggest that ZrTe possesses a three-dimensional Fermi surface that is rather complex. Our results provide a new platform to realize exotic quantum phenomena related to the new three-component fermions distinct from Dirac and Weyl fermions.
  • We report the magnetoresistance (MR), Hall effect, and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect studies of the single crystals of tungsten carbide, WC, which is predicted to be a new type of topological semimetal with triply degenerate nodes. With the magnetic field rotated in the plane perpendicular to the current, WC shows field induced metal to insulator like transition and large nonsaturating quadratic MR at low temperature. As the magnetic field parallel to the current, a pronounced negative longitudinal MR only can be observed when the current flows along the certain direction. Hall effect indicates WC is a perfect compensated semimetal, which may be related to the large nonsaturating quadratic MR. The analysis of dHvA oscillations reveals that WC is a multiband system with small cross-sectional areas of Fermi surface and light cyclotron effective masses. Our results indicate that WC is an ideal platform to study the recently proposed New Fermions with triply degenerate crossing points.
  • The pentatellurides, ZrTe5 and HfTe5 are layered compounds with one dimensional transition-metal chains that show a never understood temperature dependent transition in transport properties as well as recently discovered properties suggesting topological semimetallic behavior. Here we show that these materials are semiconductors and that the electronic transition is due to a combination of bipolar effects and different anisotropies for electrons and holes. We report magneto-transport properties for two kinds of ZrTe5 single crystals grown with the chemical vapor transport (S1) and the flux method (S2), respectively. These have distinct transport properties at zero field: the S1 displays a metallic behavior with a pronounced resistance peak and a sudden sign reversal in thermopower at approximately 130 K, consistent with previous observations of the electronic transition; in strikingly contrast, the S2 exhibits a semiconducting-like behavior at low temperatures and a positive thermopower over the whole temperature range. Refinements on the single-crystal X-ray diffraction and the energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis revealed the presence of noticeable Te-vacancies in the sample S1, confirming that the widely observed anomalous transport behaviors in pentatellurides actually take place in the Te-deficient samples. Electronic structure calculations show narrow gap semiconducting behavior, with different transport anisotropies for holes and electrons. For the degenerately doped n-type samples, our transport calculations can result in a resistivity peak and crossover in thermopower from negative to positive at temperatures close to that observed experimentally. Our present work resolves the longstanding puzzle regarding the anomalous transport behaviors of pentatellurides, and also resolves the electronic structure in favor of a semiconducting state.
  • Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron-hole pair excitations can give rise to a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in a variety of systems, such as stripe-phase nickelates, graphene and high-$T_{c}$ superconductors. Here, we reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active $A_1$ phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points (Weyl fermions) through the observation of a Fano resonance in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resultant asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously as the temperature increases. This anomalous behavior originates from the suppression of the electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation of electronic states below the Fermi level ($E_{F}$) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above $E_{F}$. Our findings not only elucidate the underlying mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance, but also open a new route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through the properties of phonons in Weyl semimetals.
  • We have investigated the magnetoresistance (MR) and Hall resistivity properties of the single crystals of tantalum sulfide, Ta3S2, which was recently predicted to be a new type II Weyl semimetal. Large MR (up to ~8000% at 2 K and 16 T), field-induced metal-insulator-like transition and nonlinear Hall resistivity are observed at low temperatures. The large MR shows a strong dependence on the field orientation, leading to a giant anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect. For the field applied along the b-axis (B//b), MR exhibits quadratic field dependence at low fields and tends towards saturation at high fields; while for B//a, MR presents quadratic field dependence at low fields and becomes linear at high fields without any trend towards saturation. The analysis of the Hall resistivity data indicates the coexistence of a large number of electrons with low mobility and a small number of holes with high mobility. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation analysis reveals three fundamental frequencies originated from the three-dimensional (3D) Fermi surface (FS) pockets. We find that the semi-classical multiband model is sufficient to account for the experimentally observed MR in Ta3S2.
  • In CaFe2As2, superconductivity can be achieved by applying a modest c-axis pressure of several kbar. Here we use scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) to explore the STM tip pressure effect on single crystals of CaFe2As2. When performing STM/S measurements, the tip-sample interaction can be controlled to act repulsive with reduction of the junction resistance, thus to apply a tip pressure on the sample. We find that an incoherent energy gap emerges at the Fermi level in the differential conductance spectrum when the tip pressure is increased. This energy gap is of the similar order of magnitude as the superconducting gap in the chemical doped compound Ca0.4Na0.6Fe2As2 and disappears at the temperature well below that of the bulk magnetic ordering. Moreover, we also observe the rhombic distortion of the As lattice, which agrees with the orthorhombic distortion of the underlying Fe lattice. These findings suggest that the STM tip pressure can induce the local Cooper pairing in the orthorhombic phase of CaFe2As2.
  • Recently, ZrTe5 and HfTe5 are theoretically studied to be the most promising layered topological insulators since they are both interlayer weakly bonded materials and also with a large bulk gap in the single layer. It paves a new way for the study of novel topological quantum phenomenon tuned via external parameters. Here, we report the discovery of superconductivity and properties evolution in HfTe5 single crystal induced via pressures. Our experiments indicated that anomaly resistance peak moves to low temperature first before reverses to high temperature followed by disappearance which is opposite to the low pressure effect on ZrTe5. HfTe5 became superconductive above ~5.5 GPa up to at least 35 GPa in the measured range. The highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc) around 5 K was achieved at 20 GPa. High pressure Raman revealed that new modes appeared around pressure where superconductivity occurs. Crystal structure studies shown that the superconductivity is related to the phase transition from Cmcm structure to monoclinic C2/m structure. The second phase transition from C2/m to P-1 structure occurs at 12 GPa. The combination of transport, structure measurement and theoretical calculations enable a completely phase diagram of HfTe5 at high pressures.
  • We use scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) to elucidate the Cooper pairing of the iron pnictide superconductor Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2. By a cold-cleaving technique, we obtain atomically resolved termination surfaces with different layer identities. Remarkably, we observe that the low-energy tunneling spectrum related to superconductivity has an unprecedented dependence on the layer-identity. By cross-referencing with the angle-revolved photoemission results and the tunneling data of LiFeAs, we find that tunneling on each termination surface probes superconductivity through selecting distinct Fe-3d orbitals. These findings imply the real-space orbital features of the Cooper pairing in the iron pnictide superconductors, and propose a new and general concept that, for complex multi-orbital material, tunneling on different terminating layers can feature orbital selectivity.
  • There is a long-standing confusion concerning the physical origin of the anomalous resistivity peak in transition metal pentatelluride HfTe5. Several mechanisms, like the formation of charge density wave or polaron, have been proposed, but so far no conclusive evidence has been presented. In this work, we investigate the unusual temperature dependence of magneto-transport properties in HfTe5. We find that a three dimensional topological Dirac semimetal state emerges only at around Tp (at which the resistivity shows a pronounced peak), as manifested by a large negative magnetoresistance. This accidental Dirac semimetal state mediates the topological quantum phase transition between the two distinct weak and strong topological insulator phases in HfTe5. Our work not only provides the first evidence of a temperature-induced critical topological phase transition in HfTe5, but also gives a reasonable explanation on the long-lasting question.
  • We report an investigation of the superconducting order parameter of the noncentrosymmetric compound PbTaSe$_2$, which is believed to have a topologically nontrivial band structure. Precise measurements of the London penetration depth $\Delta\lambda(T)$ obtained using a tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) based method show an exponential temperature dependence at $T\ll T_c$, suggesting a nodeless superconducting gap structure. A single band s-wave model well describes the corresponding normalized superfluid density, with a gap magnitude of $\Delta(0)=1.85T_c$. This is very close to the value of $1.76T_c$ for weak-coupling BCS superconductors, indicating conventional fully-gapped superconductivity in PbTaSe$_2$.
  • We have investigated the spin texture of surface Fermi arcs in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The experimental results demonstrate that the Fermi arcs are spin-polarized. The measured spin texture fulfills the requirement of mirror and time reversal symmetries and is well reproduced by our first-principles calculations, which gives strong evidence for the topologically nontrivial Weyl semimetal state in TaAs. The consistency between the experimental and calculated results further confirms the distribution of chirality of the Weyl nodes determined by first-principles calculations.
  • We present a systematic study of both the temperature and frequency dependence of the optical response in TaAs, a material that has recently been realized to host the Weyl semimetal state. Our study reveals that the optical conductivity of TaAs features a narrow Drude response alongside a conspicuous linear dependence on frequency. The width of the Drude peak decreases upon cooling, following a $T^{2}$ temperature dependence which is expected for Weyl semimetals. Two linear components with distinct slopes dominate the 5-K optical conductivity. A comparison between our experimental results and theoretical calculations suggests that the linear conductivity below $\sim$230~cm$^{-1}$ is a clear signature of the Weyl points lying in very close proximity to the Fermi energy.
  • In 1929, H. Weyl proposed that the massless solution of Dirac equation represents a pair of new type particles, the so-called Weyl fermions [1]. However the existence of them in particle physics remains elusive for more than eight decades. Recently, significant advances in both topological insulators and topological semimetals have provided an alternative way to realize Weyl fermions in condensed matter as an emergent phenomenon: when two non-degenerate bands in the three-dimensional momentum space cross in the vicinity of Fermi energy (called as Weyl nodes), the low energy excitation behaves exactly the same as Weyl fermions. Here, by performing soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements which mainly probe bulk band structure, we directly observe the long-sought-after Weyl nodes for the first time in TaAs, whose projected locations on the (001) surface match well to the Fermi arcs, providing undisputable experimental evidence of existence of Weyl fermion quasiparticles in TaAs.
  • Weyl semimetals are a class of materials that can be regarded as three-dimensional analogs of graphene breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Electrons in a Weyl semimetal behave as Weyl fermions, which have many exotic properties, such as chiral anomaly and magnetic monopoles in the crystal momentum space. The surface state of a Weyl semimetal displays pairs of entangled Fermi arcs at two opposite surfaces. However, the existence of Weyl semimetals has not yet been proved experimentally. Here we report the experimental realization of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs by observing Fermi arcs formed by its surface states using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Our first-principles calculations, matching remarkably well with the experimental results, further confirm that TaAs is a Weyl semimetal.
  • The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity is one of the dominant themes in the study of unconventional superconductors, such as high-Tc cuprates, iron pnictides and heavy fermions. In such systems, the same d- or f-electrons tend to form magnetically ordered states and participate in building up a high density of states at the Fermi level, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Charge-density-wave (CDW) is another fascinating collective quantum phenomenon in some low dimensional materials, like the prototypical transition-metal poly-chalcogenides, in which CDW instability is frequently found to accompany with superconducting transition at low temperatures. Remarkably, similar to the antiferromagnetic superconductors, superconductivity can also be achieved upon suppression of CDW order via chemical doping or applied pressure in 1T-TiSe2. However, in these CDW superconductors, the two ground states are believed to occur in different parts of Fermi surface (FS) sheets, derived mainly from chalcogen p-states and transition metal d-states, respectively. The origin of superconductivity and its interplay with CDW instability has not yet been unambiguously determined. Here we report on the discovery of bulk superconductivity in Pd-intercalated CDW RETen (RE=rare earth; n=2.5, 3) compounds, which belong to a large family of rare-earth poly-chalcogenides with CDW instability usually developing in the planar square nets of tellurium at remarkably high transition temperature and the electronic properties are also dominated by chalcogen p-orbitals. Our study demonstrates that the intercalation of palladium leads to the suppression of the CDW order and the emergence of the superconductivity. Our finding could provide an ideal model system for comprehensive studies of the interplay between CDW and superconductivity.
  • Combining in-depth neutron diffraction and systematic bulk studies, we discover that the $\sqrt{5}\times\sqrt{5}$ Fe vacancy order with its associated block antiferromagnetic order is the ground state, with varying occupancy ratio of the iron 16i and vacancy 4d sites, across the phase-diagram of K$_{\bf x}$Fe$_{\bf 2-y}$Se$_2$. The orthorhombic order with one of the four Fe sites vacant appears only at intermediate temperature as a competing phase. The material experiences an insulator to metal crossover when the $\sqrt{5}\times\sqrt{5}$ order has highly developed. Superconductivity occurs in such a metallic phase.
  • We present a polarization resolved study of the low energy band structure in the optimally doped iron pnictide superconductor Ba$_{0.6}$K$_{0.4}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ (T$_c$=37K) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Polarization-contrasted measurements are used to identify and trace all three low energy hole-like bands predicted by local density approximation (LDA) calculations. The photoemitted electrons reveal an inconsistency with LDA-predicted symmetries along the $\Gamma$-X high symmetry momentum axis, due to unexpectedly strong rotational anisotropy in electron kinetics. We evaluate many-body effects such as Mott-Hubbard interactions that are likely to underlie the anomaly, and discuss how the observed deviations from LDA band structure affect the energetics of iron pnictide Cooper pairing in the hole doped regime.
  • We report on the dramatic effect of random point defects, produced by proton irradiation, on the superfluid density $\rho_{s}$ in superconducting Ca$_{0.5}$Na$_{0.5}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ single crystals. The magnitude of the suppression is inferred from measurements of the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth $\lambda(T)$ using magnetic force microscopy. Our findings indicate that a radiation dose of 2$\times10^{16}$cm$^{-2}$ produced by 3 MeV protons results in a reduction of the superconducting critical temperature $T_{c}$ by approximately 10%. % with no appreciable change in the slope of the upper critical fields. In contrast, $\rho_{s}(0)$ is suppressed by approximately 60%. This break-down of the Abrikosov-Gorkov theory may be explained by the so-called "Swiss cheese model", which accounts for the spatial suppression of the order parameter near point defects similar to holes in Swiss cheese. Both the slope of the upper critical field and the penetration depth $\lambda(T/T_{c})/\lambda(0)$ exhibit similar temperature dependences before and after irradiation. This may be due to a combination of the highly disordered nature of Ca$_{0.5}$Na$_{0.5}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ with large intraband and simultaneous interband scattering as well as the $s^\pm$-wave nature of short coherence length superconductivity.
  • We have performed Raman-scattering measurements on high-quality single crystals of the superconductors K$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.6}$Se$_2$ ($T_c$ = 32 K), Tl$_{0.5}$K$_{0.3}$Fe$_{1.6}$Se$_2$ ($T_c$ = 29 K), and Tl$_{0.5}$Rb$_{0.3}$Fe$_{1.6}$Se$_2$ ($T_c$ = 31 K), as well as of the insulating compound KFe$_{1.5}$Se$_2$. To interpret our results, we have made first-principles calculations for the phonon modes in the ordered iron-vacancy structure of K$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.6}$Se$_2$. The modes we observe can be assigned very well from our symmetry analysis and calculations, allowing us to compare Raman-active phonons in the AFeSe compounds. We find a clear frequency difference in most phonon modes between the superconducting and non-superconducting potassium crystals, indicating the fundamental influence of iron content. By contrast, substitution of K by Tl or Rb in A$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.6}$Se$_2$ causes no substantial frequency shift for any modes above 60 cm$^{-1}$, demonstrating that the alkali-type metal has little effect on the microstructure of the FeSe layer. Several additional modes appear below 60 cm$^{-1}$ in Tl- and Rb-substituted samples, which are vibrations of heavier Tl and Rb ions. Finally, our calculations reveal the presence of "chiral" phonon modes, whose origin lies in the chiral nature of the K$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.6}$Se$_2$ structure.
  • We have performed Raman-scattering measurements on high-quality single crystals of A$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.6}$Se$_2$ superconductors of several compositions. We find a broad, asymmetric peak around 1600 cm$^{-1}$ (200 meV), which we identify as a two-magnon process involving optical magnons. The intensity of the two-magnon peak falls sharply on entering the superconducting phase. This effect, which is entirely absent in the non-superconducting system KFe$_{1.5}$Se$_2$, requires a strong mutual exclusion between antiferromagnetism and superconductivity arising from proximity effects within regions of microscale phase separation.
  • We have performed Raman-scattering measurements on a high-quality single crystal of the recently discovered Fe-based superconductor K$_{0.8}$Fe$_{1.6}$Se$_2$ ($T_c$ = 32 K). At least thirteen phonon modes were observed in the wave number range 10$-$300 cm$^{-1}$. The spectra possess a four-fold symmetry indicative of bulk vacancy order in the Fe-deficient planes. We perform a vibration analysis based on first-principles calculations, which both confirms the ordered structure and allows a complete mode assignment. We observe an anomaly at $T_c$ in the 180 cm$^{-1}$ $A_g$ mode, which indicates a rather specific type of electron-phonon coupling.
  • Structural investigations on the K0.8Fe1.6+xSe2 superconducting materials have revealed remarkable micro-stripes arising evidently from the phase separation. Two coexisted structural phases can be characterized by modulations of q1 = 1/5[a*+3b*], the antiferromagnetic phase K0.8Fe1.6Se2, and q2 = 1/2[a*+b*], the superconducting phase K0.75Fe2Se2, respectively. These stripe patterns likely result from the anisotropic assembly of superconducting particles along the [110] and [1-10] direction. In addition to the notable stripe structures, a nano-scale phase separation also appears in present superconducting system as clearly observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Certain notable experimental data obtained in this heterogenous system can be quantitatively explained by the percolation scenario.
  • We report both 23Na and 75As NMR studies on hole-doped Ca1-xNaxFe2As2 superconducting single crystals (x\approx 0.67) with Tc =32 K. Singlet superconductivity is suggested by a sharp drop of the Knight shift 75K below Tc. The spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 does not show the Slichter-Hebel coherence peak, which suggests an unconventional pairing. The penetration depth is estimated to be 0.24 {\mu}m at T=2 K. 1/75T1T shows an anisotropic behavior and a prominent low-temperature upturn, which indicates strong low-energy antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations and supports a magnetic origin of superconductivity.
  • We report a systematic study by 75As nuclear-quadrupole resonance in LaFeAsO1-xFx. The antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation (AFSF) found above the magnetic ordering temperature TN = 58 K for x = 0.03 persists in the regime 0.04 < x < 0.08 where superconductivity sets in. A dome-shaped x-dependence of the superconducting transition temperature Tc is found, with the highest Tc = 27 K at x = 0.06 which is realized under significant AFSF. With increasing x further, the AFSF decreases, and so does Tc. These features resemble closely the cuprates La2-xSrxCuO4. In x = 0.06, the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) below Tc decreases exponentially down to 0.13 Tc, which unambiguously indicates that the energy gaps are fully-opened. The temperature variation of 1/T1 below Tc is rendered nonexponential for other x by impurity scattering.