• It is difficult to establish the properties of massive stars that explode as supernovae. The electromagnetic emission during the first minutes to hours after the emergence of the shock from the stellar surface conveys important information about the final evolution and structure of the exploding star. However, the unpredictable nature of supernova events hinders the detection of this brief initial phase. Here we report the serendipitous discovery of a newly born, normal type IIb supernova (SN 2016gkg), which reveals a rapid brightening at optical wavelengths of about 40 magnitudes per day. The very frequent sampling of the observations allowed us to study in detail the outermost structure of the progenitor of the supernova and the physics of the emergence of the shock. We develop hydrodynamical models of the explosion that naturally account for the complete evolution of the supernova over distinct phases regulated by different physical processes. This result suggests that it is appropriate to decouple the treatment of the shock propagation from the unknown mechanism that triggers the explosion.
  • We present a study of observed Type II supernova (SN~II) colours using optical/near-infrared photometric data from the \textit{Carnegie Supernovae Project-I}. We analyse four colours ($B-V$, $u-g$, $g-r$, and $g-Y$) and find that SN~II colour curves can be described by two linear regimes during the photospheric phase. The first ($s_{\rm 1,colour}$) is steeper and has a median duration of $\sim 40$ days. The second, shallower slope ($s_{\rm 2,colour}$) lasts until the end of the "plateau" ($\sim 80$ days). The two slopes correlate in the sense that steeper initial colour curves also imply steeper colour curves at later phases. As suggested by recent studies, SNe~II form a continuous population of objects from the colour point of view as well. We investigate correlations between the observed colours and a range of photometric and spectroscopic parameters including the absolute magnitude, the $V$-band light-curve slopes, and metal-line strengths. We find that less luminous SNe~II appear redder, a trend that we argue is not driven by uncorrected host-galaxy reddening. While there is significant dispersion, we find evidence that redder SNe~II (mainly at early epochs) display stronger metal-line equivalent widths. Host-galaxy reddening does not appear to be a dominant parameter, neither driving observed trends nor dominating the dispersion in observed colours. Intrinsic SN~II colours are most probably dominated by photospheric temperature differences, with progenitor metallicity possibly playing a minor role. Such temperature differences could be related to differences in progenitor radius, together with the presence or absence of circumstellar material close to the progenitor stars.
  • We present an analysis of ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared observations of the fast-declining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) 2007on and 2011iv, hosted by the Fornax cluster member NGC 1404. The B-band light curves of SN 2007on and SN 2011iv are characterised by dm_15(B) decline-rate values of 1.96 mag and 1.77 mag, respectively. Although they have similar decline rates, their peak B- and H-band magnitudes differ by ~0.60 mag and ~0.35 mag, respectively. After correcting for the luminosity vs. decline rate and the luminosity vs. colour relations, the peak B-band and H-band light curves provide distances that differ by ~14% and ~9%, respectively. These findings serve as a cautionary tale for the use of transitional SNe Ia located in early-type hosts in the quest to measure cosmological parameters. Interestingly, even though SN 2011iv is brighter and bluer at early times, by three weeks past maximum and extending over several months, its B-V colour is 0.12 mag redder than that of SN 2007on. To reconcile this unusual behaviour, we turn to guidance from a suite of spherical one-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation explosion models. In this context, 56Ni production depends on both the so-called transition density and the central density of the progenitor white dwarf. To first order, the transition density drives the luminosity-width relation, while the central density is an important second-order parameter. Within this context, the differences in the B-V color evolution along the Lira regime suggests the progenitor of SN~2011iv had a higher central density than SN~2007on.
  • Although Type Ia supernova cosmology has now reached a mature state, it is important to develop as many independent methods as possible to understand the true nature of dark energy. Recent studies have shown that Type II supernovae (SNe II) offer such a path and could be used as alternative distance indicators. However, the majority of these studies were unable to extend the Hubble diagram above redshift $z=0.3$ because of observational limitations. Here, we show that we are now ready to move beyond low redshifts and attempt high-redshift ($z \gtrsim 0.3$) SN~II cosmology as a result of new-generation deep surveys such as the Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey. Applying the "standard candle method" to SN$\sim$2016jhj ($z=0.3398 \pm 0.0002$; discovered by HSC) together with a low-redshift sample, we are able to construct the highest-redshift SN II Hubble diagram to date with an observed dispersion of 0.27 mag (i.e., 12-13% in distance). This work demonstrates the bright future of SN~II cosmology in the coming era of large, wide-field surveys like that of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.
  • The first phase of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) was a dedicated supernova follow-up program based at the Las Campanas Observatory that collected science data of young, low-redshift supernovae between 2004 and 2009. Presented in this paper is the CSP-I photometric data release of low-redshift stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae. The data consist of optical (uBgVri) photometry of 34 objects, with a subset of 26 having near-infrared (YJH) photometry. Twenty objects have optical pre-maximum coverage with a subset of 12 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of B-band maximum brightness. In the near-infrared, 17 objects have pre-maximum observations with a subset of 14 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of J-band maximum brightness. Analysis of this photometric data release is presented in companion papers focusing on techniques to estimate host-galaxy extinction (Stritzinger et al., submitted) and the light-curve and progenitor star properties of the sample (Taddia et al., submitted). The analysis of an accompanying visual-wavelength spectroscopy sample of ~150 spectra will be the subject of a future paper.
  • We aim to improve upon contemporary methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe). To this end the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) SE SNe photometry data release, consisting of nearly three dozen objects, is used to identify a minimally reddened sub-sample for each traditionally defined spectroscopic sub-types (i.e, SNe~IIb, SNe~Ib, SNe~Ic). Inspection of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) colors and color evolution of the minimally reddened sub-samples reveals a high degree of homogeneity, particularly between 0d to +20d relative to B-band maximum. This motivated the construction of intrinsic color-curve templates, which when compared to the colors of reddened SE SNe, yields an entire suite of optical and NIR color excess measurements. Comparison of optical/optical vs. optical/NIR color excess measurements indicates the majority of the CSP-I SE SNe suffer relatively low amounts of reddening and we find evidence for different R_(V)^(host) values among different SE SN. Fitting the color excess measurements of the seven most reddened objects with the Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model provides robust estimates of the host visual-extinction A_(V)^(host) and R_(V)^(host). In the case of the SE SNe with relatively low amounts of reddening, a preferred value of R_(V)^(host) is adopted for each sub-type, resulting in estimates of A_(V)^(host) through Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model fits to the observed color excess measurements. Our analysis suggests SE SNe reside in galaxies characterized by a range of dust properties. We also find evidence SNe Ic are more likely to occur in regions characterized by larger R_(V)^(host) values compared to SNe IIb/Ib and they also tend to suffer more extinction. These findings are consistent with work in the literature suggesting SNe Ic tend to occur in regions of on-going star formation.
  • The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Colour Method (PCM) to 73 Type II supernovae (SNe~II) with a redshift range of 0.01--0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe~II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag is derived, i.e., 13\% in distance uncertainties. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat Universe and using the PCM, we derive a Universe's matter density: $\Omega_{m}$=0.32$^{+0.30}_{-0.21}$ providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma.
  • We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the 1987A-like supernova (SN) 2009mw. Our $BVRI$ and $g'r'i'z'$ photometry covers 167 days of evolution, including the rise to the light curve maximum, and ends just after the beginning of the linear tail phase. We compare the observational properties of SN 2009mw with those of other SNe belonging to the same subgroup, and find that it shows similarities to several objects. The physical parameters of the progenitor and the SN are estimated via hydrodynamical modelling, yielding an explosion energy of $1$ foe, a pre-SN mass of $19\,{\rm M_{\odot}}$, a progenitor radius as $30\,{\rm R_{\odot}}$ and a $^{56}$Ni mass as $0.062\,{\rm M_{\odot}}$. These values indicate that the progenitor of SN 2009mw was a blue supergiant star, similar to the progenitor of SN 1987A. We examine the host environment of SN 2009mw and find that it emerged from a population with slightly sub-solar metallicty.
  • Spectral modelling of SNII atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these SNe can be used as metallicity indicators. To assess this accuracy we present a sample of SNII HII-region spectroscopy, from which environment abundances are derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in SN spectra. Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host HII regions, by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. Then, following Dessart et al., these abundances are compared to equivalent widths of Fe 5018 A at various time and colour epochs. Our distribution of inferred SNII host HII-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of SNeII exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe 5018 A at 50 days post explosion shows a statistically significant correlation with host HII-region oxygen abundance. The strength of this correlation increases if one excludes abundance measurements derived far from SN explosion sites. The correlation significance also increases if we only analyse a 'gold' IIP sample, and if a colour epoch is used in place of time. In addition, no evidence is found of correlation between progenitor metallicity and SN light-curve or spectral properties - except for that stated above with respect to Fe 5018 A equivalent width - suggesting progenitor metallicity is not a driving factor in producing the diversity observed in our sample. This study provides observational evidence of the usefulness of SNII as metallicity indicators. We finish with a discussion of the methodology needed to use SN spectra as independent metallicity diagnostics throughout the Universe.
  • We present a Hubble diagram of type II supernovae using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I (CSP) for which optical and near-infrared light-curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the $V$ band and the second a colour term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the $(V-i)$ colour and the $r$ band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric colour method (PCM) with the standardised candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM, for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data.
  • SN 2013dy is a Type Ia supernova for which we have compiled an extraordinary dataset spanning from 0.1 to ~ 500 days after explosion. We present 10 epochs of ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared (NIR) spectra with HST/STIS, 47 epochs of optical spectra (15 of them having high resolution), and more than 500 photometric observations in the BVrRiIZYJH bands. SN 2013dy has a broad and slowly declining light curve (delta m(B) = 0.92 mag), shallow Si II 6355 absorption, and a low velocity gradient. We detect strong C II in our earliest spectra, probing unburned progenitor material in the outermost layers of the SN ejecta, but this feature fades within a few days. The UV continuum of SN 2013dy, which is strongly affected by the metal abundance of the progenitor star, suggests that SN 2013dy had a relatively high-metallicity progenitor. Examining one of the largest single set of high-resolution spectra for a SN Ia, we find no evidence of variable absorption from circumstellar material. Combining our UV spectra, NIR photometry, and high-cadence optical photometry, we construct a bolometric light curve, showing that SN 2013dy had a maximum luminosity of 10.0^{+4.8}_{-3.8} * 10^{42} erg/s. We compare the synthetic light curves and spectra of several models to SN 2013dy, finding that SN 2013dy is in good agreement with a solar-metallicity W7 model.
  • We report the late-time evolution of Type IIb Supernova (SN IIb) 2013df. SN 2013df showed a dramatic change in its spectral features at ~1 year after the explosion. Early on it showed typical characteristics shared by SNe IIb/Ib/Ic dominated by metal emission lines, while later on it was dominated by broad and flat-topped Halpha and He I emissions. The late-time spectra are strikingly similar to SN IIb 1993J, which is the only previous example clearly showing the same transition. This late-time evolution is fully explained by a change in the energy input from the $^{56}$Co decay to the interaction between the SN ejecta and dense circumstellar matter (CSM). The mass loss rate is derived to be ~(5.4 +- 3.2) x 10^{-5} Msun/yr (for the wind velocity of ~20 km/s), similar to SN 1993J but larger than SN IIb 2011dh by an order of magnitude. The striking similarity between SNe 2013df and 1993J in the (candidate) progenitors and the CSM environments, and the contrast in these natures to SN 2011dh, infer that there is a link between the natures of the progenitor and the mass loss: SNe IIb with a more extended progenitor have experienced a much stronger mass loss in the final centuries toward the explosion. It might indicate that SNe IIb from a more extended progenitor are the explosions during a strong binary interaction phase, while those from a less extended progenitor have a delay between the strong binary interaction and the explosion.
  • We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the optical transient SN 2011A. Our data spans 140 days after discovery including $BVRIu'g'r'i'z'$ photometry and 11 epochs of optical spectroscopy. Originally classified as a type IIn supernova (SN IIn) due to the presence of narrow H$\alpha$ emission, this object shows exceptional characteristics. Firstly, the light curve shows a double plateau; a property only observed before in the impostor SN 1997bs. Secondly, SN 2011A has a very low luminosity ($M_{V}=-15.72$), placing it between normal luminous SNe IIn and SN impostors. Thirdly, SN 2011A shows low velocity and high equivalent width absorption close to the sodium doublet, which increases with time and is most likely of circumstellar origin. This evolution is also accompanied by a change of line profile; when the absorption becomes stronger, a P-Cygni profile appears. We discuss SN 2011A in the context of interacting SNe IIn and SN impostors, which appears to confirm the uniqueness of this transient. While we favour an impostor origin for SN 2011A, we highlight the difficulty in differentiating between terminal and non-terminal interacting transients.
  • Aims. We present and analyse late-time observations of the type-Ib supernova with possible pre-supernova progenitor detection, iPTF13bvn, taken at $\sim$300 days after the explosion, and discuss these in the context of constraints on the supernova's progenitor. Previous studies have proposed two possible natures for the progenitor of the supernova, i.e. a massive Wolf-Rayet star or a lower-mass star in close binary system. Methods. Our observations show that the supernova has entered the nebular phase, with the spectrum dominated by Mg~I]$\lambda\lambda$4571, [O~I]$\lambda\lambda$6300, 6364, and [Ca~II]$\lambda\lambda$7291, 7324 emission lines. We measured the emission line fluxes to estimate the core oxygen mass and compare the [O~I]/[Ca~II] line ratio with other supernovae. Results. The core oxygen mass of the supernova progenitor was estimated to be $\lesssim$0.7 M$_\odot$, which implies initial progenitor mass not exceeding $\sim$15 -- 17 M$_\odot$. Since the derived mass is too small for a single star to become a Wolf-Rayet star, this result lends more support to the binary nature of the progenitor star of iPTF13bvn. The comparison of [O~I]/[Ca~II] line ratio with other supernovae also shows that iPTF13bvn appears to be in close association with the lower-mass progenitors of stripped-envelope and type-II supernovae.
  • We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\lambda}1.0693 {\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a "transitional" event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest composition and density of the inner core similar to that of 91bg-like events, and a deep reaching carbon burning layer not observed in slower declining SNe Ia. There is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II {\lambda}0.6355 {\mu}m line, implying a long dark phase of ~ 4 days.
  • We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e. objects with light-curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and absence of secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting out this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have similar photometric characteristics as 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large up-coming wide field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.
  • SN 2014J in M82 is the closest detected Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in at least 28 years and perhaps in 410 years. Despite its small distance of 3.3 Mpc, SN 2014J is surprisingly faint, peaking at V = 10.6 mag, and assuming a typical SN Ia luminosity, we infer an observed visual extinction of A_V = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mag. But this picture, with R_V = 1.6 +/- 0.2, is too simple to account for all observations. We combine 10 epochs (spanning a month) of HST/STIS ultraviolet through near-infrared spectroscopy with HST/WFC3, KAIT, and FanCam photometry from the optical to the infrared and 9 epochs of high-resolution TRES spectroscopy to investigate the sources of extinction and reddening for SN 2014J. We argue that the wide range of observed properties for SN 2014J is caused by a combination of dust reddening, likely originating in the interstellar medium of M82, and scattering off circumstellar material. For this model, roughly half of the extinction is caused by reddening from typical dust (E(B-V ) = 0.45 mag and R_V = 2.6) and roughly half by scattering off LMC-like dust in the circumstellar environment of SN 2014J.
  • In classical P-Cygni profiles, theory predicts emission to peak at zero rest velocity. However, supernova spectra exhibit emission that is generally blue shifted. While this characteristic has been reported in many supernovae, it is rarely discussed in any detail. Here we present an analysis of H-alpha emission-peaks using a dataset of 95 type II supernovae, quantifying their strength and time evolution. Using a post-explosion time of 30d, we observe a systematic blueshift of H-alpha emission, with a mean value of -2000 kms-1. This offset is greatest at early times but vanishes as supernovae become nebular. Simulations of Dessart et al. (2013) match the observed behaviour, reproducing both its strength and evolution in time. Such blueshifts are a fundamental feature of supernova spectra as they are intimately tied to the density distribution of ejecta, which falls more rapidly than in stellar winds. This steeper density structure causes line emission/absorption to be much more confined; it also exacerbates the occultation of the receding part of the ejecta, biasing line emission to the blue for a distant observer. We conclude that blue-shifted emission-peak offsets of several thousand kms-1 are a generic property of observations, confirmed by models, of photospheric-phase type II supernovae.
  • We explore a method for metallicity determinations based on quantitative spectroscopy of type II-Plateau (II-P) supernovae (SNe). For consistency, we first evolve a set of 15Msun main sequence stars at 0.1, 0.4, 1, and 2 x the solar metallicity. At the onset of core collapse, we trigger a piston-driven explosion and model the resulting ejecta and radiation. Our theoretical models of such red-supergiant-star explosions at different metallicity show that synthetic spectra of SNe II-P possess optical signatures during the recombination phase that are sensitive to metallicity variations. This sensitivity can be quantified and the metallicity inferred from the strength of metal-line absorptions. Furthermore, these signatures are not limited to O, but also include Na, Ca, Sc, Ti, or Fe. When compared to a sample of SNe II-P from the Carnegie SN Project and previous SN followup programs, we find that most events lie at a metallicity between 0.4 and 2 x solar, with a marked scarcity of SN II-P events at SMC metallicity. This most likely reflects the paucity of low metallicity star forming regions in the local Universe. SNe II-P have high plateau luminosities that make them observable spectroscopically at large distances. Because they exhibit signatures of diverse metal species, in the future they may offer a means to constrain the evolution of the composition (e.g., the O/Fe ratio) in the Universe out to a redshift of one and beyond.
  • A comprehensive set of optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and spectroscopy is presented for the faint and fast 2008ha-like supernova (SN) 2010ae. Contingent on the adopted value of host extinction, SN 2010ae reached a peak brightness of -13.8 > M_V > -15.3 mag, while modeling of the UVOIR light curve suggests it produced 0.003--0.007 M_sun of (56)Ni, ejected 0.30--0.60 M_sun of material, and had an explosion energy of 0.04--0.30x10^51 erg. The values of these explosion parameters are similar to the peculiar SN 2008ha --for which we also present previously unpublished early phase optical and NIR light curves-- and places these two transients at the faint end of the 2002cx-like SN population. Detailed inspection of the post maximum NIR spectroscopic sequence indicates the presence of a multitude of spectral features, which are identified through SYNAPPS modeling to be mainly attributed to Co II. Comparison with a collection of published and unpublished NIR spectra of other 2002cx-like SNe, reveals that a Co II footprint is ubiquitous to this subclass of transients, providing a link to Type Ia SNe. A visual-wavelength spectrum of SN 2010ae obtained at +252 days past maximum shows a striking resemblance to a similar epoch spectrum of SN 2002cx. However, subtle differences in the strength and ratio of calcium emission features, as well as diversity among similar epoch spectra of other 2002cx-like SNe indicates a range of physical conditions of the ejecta, highlighting the heterogeneous nature of this peculiar class of transients.
  • We present ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2009N in NGC 4487. This object is a type II-P supernova with spectra resembling those of subluminous II-P supernovae, while its bolometric luminosity is similar to that of the intermediate luminosity SN 2008in. We created SYNOW models of the plateau phase spectra for line identification and to measure the expansion velocity. In the near-infrared spectra we find signs indicating possible weak interaction between the supernova ejecta and the pre-existing circumstellar material. These signs are also present in the previously unpublished near-infrared spectra of SN 2008in. The distance to SN 2009N is determined via the expanding photosphere method and the standard candle method as $D= 21.6 \pm 1.1\,{\mathrm {Mpc}}$. The produced nickel-mass is estimated to be $\sim 0.020 \pm 0.004\,{\mathrm M_\odot}$. We infer the physical properties of the progenitor at the explosion through hydrodynamical modelling of the observables. We find the values of the total energy as $\sim 0.48 \times 10^{51}\, {\mathrm {erg}}$, the ejected mass as $\sim 11.5\,{\mathrm M_\odot}$, and the initial radius as $\sim 287\,{\mathrm R_\odot}$.
  • Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the Universe. Our knowledge on their importance to dust production is, however, limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) 2010jl around one and half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ~1,350 - 1,450K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ~(7.5 - 8.5) x 10^{-4} Msun. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate on the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (~0.1 micron, and most likely <~0.01 micron). We attribute the dust grains to have been formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ~10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density is required to be >~3 x 10^{7} cm^{-3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of >~0.02 Msun yr^{-1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ~100 km s^{-1}). This strongly supports a scenario that SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous Blue Variable (LBV)-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.
  • The observational diversity displayed by various Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) is explored and quantified. In doing so, a more coherent picture ascribing the variety of observed SNe IIn types to particular progenitor scenarios is sought. Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) optical and near-infrared light curves and visual-wavelength spectroscopy of the Type IIn SNe 2005kj, 2006aa, 2006bo, 2006qq, and 2008fq are presented. Combined with previously published observations of the Type IIn SNe 2005ip and 2006jd, the full CSP sample is used to derive physical parameters that describe the nature of the interaction between the expanding SN ejecta and the circumstellar material (CSM). For each SN of our sample, we find counterparts, identifying objects similar to SNe 1994W (SN 2006bo), 1998S (SN 2008fq), and 1988Z (SN 2006qq). We present the unprecedented initial $u$-band plateau of SN 2006aa, and its peculiar late-time luminosity and temperature evolution. For each SN, mass-loss rates of 10$^{-4}-10^{-2}$ $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ are derived, assuming the CSM was formed by steady winds. Typically wind velocities of a few hundred km s$^{-1}$ are also computed. The CSP SN IIn sample seems to be divided into subcategories rather than to have exhibited a continuum of observational properties. The wind and mass-loss parameters would favor a luminous blue variable progenitor scenario. However the assumptions made to derive those parameters strongly influence the results, and therefore, other progenitor channels behind SNe IIn cannot be excluded at this time.
  • We provide additional observational evidence that some Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) show signatures of circumstellar interaction (CSI) with hydrogen-rich material. Early phase optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and spectroscopy of SN 2008J obtained by the Carnegie Supernova Project are studied and compared to those of SNe 2002ic and 2005gj. Our NIR spectrum is the first obtained for a 2002ic-like object extending up to 2.2 $\mu$m. A published high-resolution spectrum is used to provide insight on the circumstellar material (CSM). SN 2008J is found to be affected by $A_V\sim$ 1.9 mag of extinction and to closely resemble SN 2002ic. Spectral and color comparison to SNe 2002ic and 2005gj suggests $R_V$ $<$ 3.1. Spectral decomposition reveals the underlying SN emission matches a 1991T-like event and, since SN 2008J is as luminous as SN 2005gj ($V_{\rm max}$ $=$ $-$20.3 mag), we conclude that their CSI emissions are similarly robust. The high-resolution spectrum reveals narrow emission lines produced from un-shocked gas characterized by a wind velocity of $\sim$ 50 km s$^{-1}$. We conclude that SN 2008J best matches an explosion of a SN Ia that interacts with its CSM.
  • Consistency between Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) and SDSS-II supernova (SN) survey ugri measurements has been evaluated by comparing SDSS and CSP photometry for nine spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernova observed contemporaneously by both programs. The CSP data were transformed into the SDSS photometric system. Sources of systematic uncertainty have been identified, quantified, and shown to be at or below the 0.023 magnitude level in all bands. When all photometry for a given band is combined, we find average magnitude differences of equal to or less than 0.011 magnitudes in ugri, with rms scatter ranging from 0.043 to 0.077 magnitudes. The u band agreement is promising, with the caveat that only four of the nine supernovae are well-observed in u and these four exhibit an 0.038 magnitude supernova-to-supernova scatter in this filter.