• Only a small fraction of observed Active Galactic Nuclei display large-scale radio emission associated with jets, yet these radio-loud AGN have become increasingly important in models of galaxy evolution. In determining the dynamics and energetics of the radio sources over cosmic time, a key question concerns what happens when their jets switch off. The resulting `remnant' radio-loud AGN have been surprisingly evasive in past radio surveys, and therefore statistical information on the population of radio-loud AGN in their dying phase is limited. In this paper, with the recent developments of LOFAR and the VLA, we are able to provide a systematically selected sample of remnant radio-loud AGN in the Herschel-ATLAS field. Using a simple core-detection method, we constrain the upper limit on the fraction of remnants in our radio-loud AGN sample to 9 per cent, implying that the extended lobe emission fades rapidly once the core/jets turn off. We also find that our remnant sample has a wide range of spectral indices ($-1.5\leqslant \alpha^{1400}_{150}\leqslant -0.5$), confirming that the lobes of some remnants may possess flat spectra at low frequencies just as active sources do. We suggest that, even with the unprecedented sensitivity of LOFAR, our sample may still only contain the youngest of the remnant population.
  • We present a new analysis of the widely used relation between cavity power and radio luminosity in clusters of galaxies with evidence for strong AGN feedback. We study the correlation at low radio frequencies using two new surveys - the First Alternative Data Release of the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS ADR1) at 148 MHz and LOFAR's first all-sky survey, the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) at 140 MHz. We find a scaling relation $P_{\rm cav} \propto L_{148}^{\beta}$, with a logarithmic slope of $\beta = 0.51 \pm 0.14$, which is in good agreement with previous results based on data at 327 MHz. The large scatter present in this correlation confirms the conclusion reached at higher frequencies that the total radio luminosity at a single frequency is a poor predictor of the total jet power. We show that including measurements at 148 MHz alone is insufficient to reliably compute the bolometric radio luminosity and reduce the scatter in the correlation. For a subset of four well-resolved sources, we examine the detected extended structures at low frequencies and compare with the morphology known from higher frequency images and Chandra X-ray maps. In Perseus we discuss details in the structures of the radio mini-halo, while in the 2A 0335+096 cluster we observe new diffuse emission associated with multiple X-ray cavities and likely originating from past activity. For A2199 and MS 0735.6+7421, we confirm that the observed low-frequency radio lobes are confined to the extents known from higher frequencies. This new low-frequency analysis highlights the fact that existing cavity power to radio luminosity relations are based on a relatively narrow range of AGN outburst ages. We discuss how the correlation could be extended using low frequency data from the LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) in combination with future, complementary deeper X-ray observations.
  • We present a study of the low-frequency radio properties of star forming (SF) galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) up to redshift $z=2.5$. The new spectral window probed by the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) allows us to reconstruct the radio continuum emission from 150 MHz to 1.4 GHz to an unprecedented depth for a radio-selected sample of $1542$ galaxies in $\sim 7~ \rm{deg}^2$ of the LOFAR Bo\"otes field. Using the extensive multi-wavelength dataset available in Bo\"otes and detailed modelling of the FIR to UV spectral energy distribution (SED), we are able to separate the star-formation (N=758) and the AGN (N=784) dominated populations. We study the shape of the radio SEDs and their evolution across cosmic time and find significant differences in the spectral curvature between the SF galaxy and AGN populations. While the radio spectra of SF galaxies exhibit a weak but statistically significant flattening, AGN SEDs show a clear trend to become steeper towards lower frequencies. No evolution of the spectral curvature as a function of redshift is found for SF galaxies or AGN. We investigate the redshift evolution of the infrared-radio correlation (IRC) for SF galaxies and find that the ratio of total infrared to 1.4 GHz radio luminosities decreases with increasing redshift: $ q_{\rm 1.4GHz} = (2.45 \pm 0.04) \times (1+z)^{-0.15 \pm 0.03} $. Similarly, $q_{\rm 150MHz}$ shows a redshift evolution following $ q_{\rm 150GHz} = (1.72 \pm 0.04) \times (1+z)^{-0.22 \pm 0.05}$. Calibration of the 150 MHz radio luminosity as a star formation rate tracer suggests that a single power-law extrapolation from $q_{\rm 1.4GHz}$ is not an accurate approximation at all redshifts.
  • We present LOFAR High-Band Array (HBA) observations of the Herschel-ATLAS North Galactic Pole survey area. The survey we have carried out, consisting of four pointings covering around 142 square degrees of sky in the frequency range 126--173 MHz, does not provide uniform noise coverage but otherwise is representative of the quality of data to be expected in the planned LOFAR wide-area surveys, and has been reduced using recently developed `facet calibration' methods at a resolution approaching the full resolution of the datasets ($\sim 10 \times 6$ arcsec) and an rms off-source noise that ranges from 100 $\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ in the centre of the best fields to around 2 mJy beam$^{-1}$ at the furthest extent of our imaging. We describe the imaging, cataloguing and source identification processes, and present some initial science results based on a 5-$\sigma$ source catalogue. These include (i) an initial look at the radio/far-infrared correlation at 150 MHz, showing that many Herschel sources are not yet detected by LOFAR; (ii) number counts at 150 MHz, including, for the first time, observational constraints on the numbers of star-forming galaxies; (iii) the 150-MHz luminosity functions for active and star-forming galaxies, which agree well with determinations at higher frequencies at low redshift, and show strong redshift evolution of the star-forming population; and (iv) some discussion of the implications of our observations for studies of radio galaxy life cycles.
  • We examine the relationship between star formation and AGN activity by constructing matched samples of local ($0<z<0.6$) radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN in the $\textit{Herschel}$-ATLAS fields. Radio-loud AGN are classified as high-excitation and low-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs, LERGs) using their emission lines and $\textit{WISE}$ 22-$\mu$m luminosity. AGN accretion and jet powers in these active galaxies are traced by [OIII] emission-line and radio luminosity, respectively. Star formation rates (SFRs) and specific star formation rates (SSFRs) were derived using $\textit{Herschel}$ 250-$\mu$m luminosity and stellar mass measurements from the SDSS$-$MPA-JHU catalogue. In the past, star formation studies of AGN have mostly focused on high-redshift sources to observe the thermal dust emission that peaks in the far-infrared, which limited the samples to powerful objects. However, with $\textit{Herschel}$ we can expand this to low redshifts. Our stacking analyses show that SFRs and SSFRs of both radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN increase with increasing AGN power but that radio-loud AGN tend to have lower SFR. Additionally, radio-quiet AGN are found to have approximately an order of magnitude higher SSFRs than radio-loud AGN for a given level of AGN power. The difference between the star formation properties of radio-loud and -quiet AGN is also seen in samples matched in stellar mass.
  • Obtaining lensing time delay measurements requires long-term monitoring campaigns with a high enough resolution (< 1 arcsec) to separate the multiple images. In the radio, a limited number of high-resolution interferometer arrays make these observations difficult to schedule. To overcome this problem, we propose a technique for measuring gravitational time delays which relies on monitoring the total flux density with low-resolution but high-sensitivity radio telescopes to follow the variation of the brighter image. This is then used to trigger high-resolution observations in optimal numbers which then reveal the variation in the fainter image. We present simulations to assess the efficiency of this method together with a pilot project observing radio lens systems with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) to trigger Very Large Array (VLA) observations. This new method is promising for measuring time delays because it uses relatively small amounts of time on high-resolution telescopes. This will be important because instruments that have high sensitivity but limited resolution, together with an optimum usage of followup high-resolution observations from appropriate radio telescopes may in the future be useful for gravitational lensing time delay measurements by means of this new method.
  • We present an analysis of four complete samples of radio-loud AGN (3CRR, 2Jy, 6CE and 7CE) using near- and mid-IR data taken by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The combined sample consists of 79 quasars and 273 radio galaxies, and covers a redshift range 0.003<z<3.395. The dichotomy in the mid-IR properties of low- and high-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs - HERGs) is analysed for the first time using large complete samples. Our results demonstrate that a division in the accretion modes of LERGs and HERGs clearly stands out in the mid-IR-radio plane (L_(22 \mu m) = 5x10^(43) erg s^(-1)). This means that WISE data can be effectively used to diagnose accretion modes in radio-loud AGN. The mid-IR properties of all objects were analysed to test the unification between quasars and radio galaxies, consistent with earlier work and we argue that smooth torus models best reproduce the observation. Quasars are found to have higher mid-IR luminosities than radio galaxies. We also studied all the sources in the near-IR to gain insights into evolution of AGN host galaxies. A relation found between the near-IR luminosity and redshift, well-known in the near-IR, is apparent in the two near-IR WISE bands, supporting the idea that radio sources are hosted by massive elliptical galaxies that formed their stars at high redshifts and evolved passively thereafter. Evaluation of the positions of the sample objects in WISE colour-colour diagrams shows that widely used WISE colour cuts are not completely reliable in selecting AGN.
  • The Hubble constant value is currently known to 10% accuracy unless assumptions are made for the cosmology (Sandage et al. 2006). Gravitational lens systems provide another probe of the Hubble constant using time delay measurements. However, current investigations of ~20 time delay lenses, albeit of varying levels of sophistication, have resulted in different values of the Hubble constant ranging from 50-80 km/s/Mpc. In order to reduce uncertainties, more time delay measurements are essential together with better determined mass models (Oguri 2007, Saha et al. 2006). We propose a more efficient technique for measuring time delays which does not require regular monitoring with a high-resolution interferometer array. The method uses double image and long-axis quadruple lens systems in which the brighter component varies first and dominates the total flux density. Monitoring the total flux density with low-resolution but high sensitivity radio telescopes provides the variation of the brighter image and is used to trigger high-resolution observations which can then be used to see the variation in the fainter image. We present simulations of this method together with a pilot project using the WSRT (Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope) to trigger VLA (Very Large Array) observations. This new method is promising for measuring time delays because it uses relatively small amounts of time on high-resolution telescopes. This will be important because many SKA pathfinder telescopes, such as MeerKAT (Karoo Array Telescope) and ASKAP (Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder), have high sensitivity but limited resolution.