• Metal to insulator transitions (MITs) driven by strong electronic correlations are common in condensed matter systems, and are associated with some of the most remarkable collective phenomena in solids, including superconductivity and magnetism. Tuning and control of the transition holds the promise of novel, low power, ultrafast electronics, but the relative roles of doping, chemistry, elastic strain and other applied fields has made systematic understanding difficult to obtain. Here we point out that existing data on tuning of the MIT in perovskite transition metal oxides through ionic size effects provides evidence of systematic and large effects on the phase transition due to dynamical fluctuations of the elastic strain, which have been usually neglected. This is illustrated by a simple yet quantitative statistical mechanical calculation in a model that incorporates cooperative lattice distortions coupled to the electronic degrees of freedom. We reproduce the observed dependence of the transition temperature on cation radius in the well-studied manganite and nickelate materials. Since the elastic couplings are generically quite strong, these conclusions will broadly generalize to all MITs that couple to a change in lattice symmetry.
  • Recent experiments on doped SrTiO$_3$ have shown that superconductivity is favored by its proximity to a quantum ferroelectric instability, suggesting that pairing between its charge carriers could be promoted by quantum criticality. Here, we consider a model that combines a strong coupling theory of superconductors with a standard framework for the soft polar modes in SrTiO$_3$ including their coupling to strain degrees of freedom, lattice dimensionality, displacive nature, and the long-ranged and anisotropic dipolar interactions, which are usually neglected. Our calculations of the superconducting temperature $T_c$ for several applied stresses and cation substitutions reveal that while quantum criticality favors superconductivity, optimal doping is not necessarily pinned to the quantum critical point. We qualitatively reproduce the observed reduction of $T_c$ with hydrostatic pressure and use our model to gain insight into the aforementioned experiments.
  • The structural phase transitions of MF$_3$ (M=Al, Cr, V, Fe, Ti, Sc) metal trifluorides are studied within a simple Landau theory consisting of tilts of rigid MF$_6$ octahedra associated with soft antiferrodistoritive optic modes that are coupled to long-wavelength strain generating acoustic phonons. We calculate the temperature and pressure dependence of several quantities such as the spontaneous distortions, volume expansion and shear strains as well as $T-P$ phase diagrams. By contrasting our model to experiments we quantify the deviations from mean-field behavior and found that the tilt fluctuations of the MF$_6$ octahedra increase with metal cation size. We apply our model to predict giant barocaloric effects in Sc substituted TiF$_3$ of up to about $15\,$JK$^{-1}$kg$^{-1}$ for modest hydrostatic compressions of $0.2\,$GPa. The effect extends over a wide temperature range of over $140\,$K (including room temperature) due to a large predicted rate $dT_c/dP = 723\,$K GPa$^{-1}$, which exceeds those of typical barocaloric materials. Our results suggest that open lattice frameworks such as the trifluorides are an attractive platform to search for giant barocaloric effects.
  • Relaxor ferroelectrics are complex oxide materials which are rather unique to study the effects of compositional disorder on phase transitions. Here, we study the effects of quenched cubic random electric fields on the lattice instabilities that lead to a ferroelectric transition and show that, within a microscopic model and a statistical mechanical solution, even weak compositional disorder can prohibit the development of long-range order and that a random field state with anisotropic and power-law correlations of polarization emerges from the combined effect of their characteristic dipole forces and their inherent charge disorder. We compare and reproduce several key experimental observations in the well- studied relaxor PbMg$_{1/3}$Nb$_{2/3}$O$_3$-PbTiO$_3$.
  • Ferroelectrics are attractive candidate materials for environmentally friendly solid state refrigeration free of greenhouse gases. Their thermal response upon variations of external electric fields is largest in the vicinity of their phase transitions, which may occur near room temperature. The magnitude of the effect, however, is too small for useful cooling applications even when they are driven close to dielectric breakdown. Insight from microscopic theory is therefore needed to characterize materials and provide guiding principles to search for new ones with enhanced electrocaloric performance. Here, we derive from well-known microscopic models of ferroelectricity meaningful figures of merit which provide insight into the relation between the strength of the effect and the characteristic interactions of ferroelectrics such as dipole forces. We find that the long range nature of these interactions results in a small effect. A strategy is proposed to make it larger by shortening the correlation lengths of fluctuations of polarization.
  • We study a minimal model for a relaxor ferroelectric including dipolar interactions, and short-range harmonic and anharmonic forces for the critical modes as in the theory of pure ferroelectrics together with quenched disorder coupled linearly to the critical modes. We present the simplest approximate solution of the model necessary to obtain the principal features of the correlation functions. Specifically, we calculate and compare the structure factor measured by neutron scattering in different characteristic regimes of temperature in the relaxor PbMg$_{1/3}$Nb$_{2/3}$O$_3$.
  • This article reviews silicene, a relatively new allotrope of silicon, which can also be viewed as the silicon version of graphene. Graphene is a two-dimensional material with unique electronic properties qualitatively different from those of standard semiconductors such as silicon. While many other two-dimensional materials are now being studied, our focus here is solely on silicene. We first discuss its synthesis and the challenges presented. Next, a survey of some of its physical properties is provided. Silicene shares many of the fascinating properties of graphene, such as the so-called Dirac electronic dispersion. The slightly different structure, however, leads to a few major differences compared to graphene, such as the ability to open a bandgap in the presence of an electric field or on a substrate, a key property for digital electronics applications. We conclude with a brief survey of some of the potential applications of silicene.
  • We study the free energy landscape of a minimal model for relaxor ferroelectrics. Using a variational method which includes leading correlations beyond the mean-field approximation as well as disorder averaging at the level of a simple replica theory, we find metastable paraelectric states with a stability region that extends to zero temperature. The free energy of such states exhibits an essential singularity for weak compositional disorder pointing to their necessary occurrence. Ferroelectric states appear as local minima in the free energy at high temperatures and become stable below a coexistence temperature $T_c$. We calculate the phase diagram in the electric field-temperature plane and find a coexistence line of the polar and non-polar phases which ends at a critical point. First-order phase transitions are induced for fields sufficiently large to cross the region of stability of the metastable paraelectric phase. These polar and non-polar states have distinct structure factors from those of conventional ferroelectrics. We use this theoretical framework to compare and to gain physical understanding of various experimental results in typical relaxors.