• L. Amati, P. O'Brien, D. Goetz, E. Bozzo, C. Tenzer, F. Frontera, G. Ghirlanda, C. Labanti, J. P. Osborne, G. Stratta, N. Tanvir, R. Willingale, P. Attina, R. Campana, A.J. Castro-Tirado, C. Contini, F. Fuschino, A. Gomboc, R. Hudec, P. Orleanski, E. Renotte, T. Rodic, Z. Bagoly, A. Blain, P. Callanan, S. Covino, A. Ferrara, E. Le Floch, M. Marisaldi, S. Mereghetti, P. Rosati, A. Vacchi, P. D'Avanzo, P. Giommi, A. Gomboc, S. Piranomonte, L. Piro, V. Reglero, A. Rossi, A. Santangelo, R. Salvaterra, G. Tagliaferri, S. Vergani, S. Vinciguerra, M. Briggs, E. Campolongo, R. Ciolfi, V. Connaughton, B. Cordier, B. Morelli, M. Orlandini, C. Adami, A. Argan, J.-L. Atteia, N. Auricchio, L. Balazs, G. Baldazzi, S. Basa, R. Basak, P. Bellutti, M. G. Bernardini, G. Bertuccio, J. Braga, M. Branchesi, S. Brandt, E. Brocato, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, A. Bulgarelli, L. Burderi, J. Camp, S. Capozziello, J. Caruana, P. Casella, B. Cenko, P. Chardonnet, B. Ciardi, S. Colafrancesco, M. G. Dainotti, V. D'Elia, D. De Martino, M. De Pasquale, E. Del Monte, M. Della Valle, A. Drago, Y. Evangelista, M. Feroci, F. Finelli, M. Fiorini, J. Fynbo, A. Gal-Yam, B. Gendre, G. Ghisellini, A. Grado, C. Guidorzi, M. Hafizi, L. Hanlon, J. Hjorth, L. Izzo, L. Kiss, P. Kumar, I. Kuvvetli, M. Lavagna, T. Li, F. Longo, M. Lyutikov, U. Maio, E. Maiorano, P. Malcovati, D. Malesani, R. Margutti, A. Martin-Carrillo, N. Masetti, S. McBreen, R. Mignani, G. Morgante, C. Mundell, H. U. Nargaard-Nielsen, L. Nicastro, E. Palazzi, S. Paltani, F. Panessa, G. Pareschi, A. Pe'er, A. V. Penacchioni, E. Pian, E. Piedipalumbo, T. Piran, G. Rauw, M. Razzano, A. Read, L. Rezzolla, P. Romano, R. Ruffini, S. Savaglio, V. Sguera, P. Schady, W. Skidmore, L. Song, E. Stanway, R. Starling, M. Topinka, E. Troja, M. van Putten, E. Vanzella, S. Vercellone, C. Wilson-Hodge, D. Yonetoku, G. Zampa, N. Zampa, B. Zhang, B. B. Zhang, S. Zhang, S.-N. Zhang, A. Antonelli, F. Bianco, S. Boci, M. Boer, M. T. Botticella, O. Boulade, C. Butler, S. Campana, F. Capitanio, A. Celotti, Y. Chen, M. Colpi, A. Comastri, J.-G. Cuby, M. Dadina, A. De Luca, Y.-W. Dong, S. Ettori, P. Gandhi, E. Geza, J. Greiner, S. Guiriec, J. Harms, M. Hernanz, A. Hornstrup, I. Hutchinson, G. Israel, P. Jonker, Y. Kaneko, N. Kawai, K. Wiersema, S. Korpela, V. Lebrun, F. Lu, A. MacFadyen, G. Malaguti, L. Maraschi, A. Melandri, M. Modjaz, D. Morris, N. Omodei, A. Paizis, P. Pata, V. Petrosian, A. Rachevski, J. Rhoads, F. Ryde, L. Sabau-Graziati, N. Shigehiro, M. Sims, J. Soomin, D. Szecsi, Y. Urata, M. Uslenghi, L. Valenziano, G. Vianello, S. Vojtech, D. Watson, J. Zicha
    March 27, 2018 astro-ph.IM, astro-ph.HE
    THESEUS is a space mission concept aimed at exploiting Gamma-Ray Bursts for investigating the early Universe and at providing a substantial advancement of multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics. These goals will be achieved through a unique combination of instruments allowing GRB and X-ray transient detection over a broad field of view (more than 1sr) with 0.5-1 arcmin localization, an energy band extending from several MeV down to 0.3 keV and high sensitivity to transient sources in the soft X-ray domain, as well as on-board prompt (few minutes) follow-up with a 0.7 m class IR telescope with both imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. THESEUS will be perfectly suited for addressing the main open issues in cosmology such as, e.g., star formation rate and metallicity evolution of the inter-stellar and intra-galactic medium up to redshift $\sim$10, signatures of Pop III stars, sources and physics of re-ionization, and the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, it will provide unprecedented capability to monitor the X-ray variable sky, thus detecting, localizing, and identifying the electromagnetic counterparts to sources of gravitational radiation, which may be routinely detected in the late '20s / early '30s by next generation facilities like aLIGO/ aVirgo, eLISA, KAGRA, and Einstein Telescope. THESEUS will also provide powerful synergies with the next generation of multi-wavelength observatories (e.g., LSST, ELT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA).
  • We performed a search for eclipsing and dipping sources in the archive of the EXTraS project - a systematic characterization of the temporal behaviour of XMM-Newton point sources. We discovered dips in the X-ray light curve of 3XMM J004232.1+411314, which has been recently associated with the hard X-ray source dominating the emission of M31. A systematic analysis of XMM-Newton observations revealed 13 dips in 40 observations (total exposure time $\sim$0.8 Ms). Among them, four observations show two dips, separated by $\sim$4.01 hr. Dip depths and durations are variable. The dips occur only during low-luminosity states (L$_{0.2-12}<1\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$), while the source reaches L$_{0.2-12}\sim2.8\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We propose this system to be a new dipping Low-Mass X-ray Binary in M31 seen at high inclination (60$^{\circ}$-80$^{\circ}$), the observed dipping periodicity is the orbital period of the system. A blue HST source within the Chandra error circle is the most likely optical counterpart of the accretion disk. The high luminosity of the system makes it the most luminous dipper known to date.
  • The merger of two neutron stars is predicted to give rise to three major detectable phenomena: a short burst of gamma-rays, a gravitational wave signal, and a transient optical/near-infrared source powered by the synthesis of large amounts of very heavy elements via rapid neutron capture (the r-process). Such transients, named "macronovae" or "kilonovae", are believed to be centres of production of rare elements such as gold and platinum. The most compelling evidence so far for a kilonova was a very faint near-infrared rebrightening in the afterglow of a short gamma-ray burst at z = 0.356, although findings indicating bluer events have been reported. Here we report the spectral identification and describe the physical properties of a bright kilonova associated with the gravitational wave source GW 170817 and gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A associated with a galaxy at a distance of 40 Mpc from Earth. Using a series of spectra from ground-based observatories covering the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared, we find that the kilonova is characterized by rapidly expanding ejecta with spectral features similar to those predicted by current models. The ejecta is optically thick early on, with a velocity of about 0.2 times light speed, and reaches a radius of about 50 astronomical units in only 1.5 days. As the ejecta expands, broad absorption-like lines appear on the spectral continuum indicating atomic species produced by nucleosynthesis that occurs in the post-merger fast-moving dynamical ejecta and in two slower (0.05 times light speed) wind regions. Comparison with spectral models suggests that the merger ejected 0.03-0.05 solar masses of material, including high-opacity lanthanides.
  • We report the results of deep optical follow-up surveys of the first two gravitational-wave sources, GW150914 and GW151226, done by the GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm Collaboration (GRAWITA). The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) responded promptly to the gravitational-wave alerts sent by the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations, monitoring a region of $90$ deg$^2$ and $72$ deg$^2$ for GW150914 and GW151226, respectively, and repeated the observations over nearly two months. Both surveys reached an average limiting magnitude of about 21 in the $r-$band. The paper describes the VST observational strategy and two independent procedures developed to search for transient counterpart candidates in multi-epoch VST images. Several transients have been discovered but no candidates are recognized to be related to the gravitational-wave events. Interestingly, among many contaminant supernovae, we find a possible correlation between the supernova VSTJ57.77559-59.13990 and GRB150827A detected by {\it Fermi}-GBM. The detection efficiency of VST observations for different types of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave events are evaluated for the present and future follow-up surveys.
  • Rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars are two different observational manifestations of neutron stars: rotation powered pulsars are rapidly spinning objects that are mostly observed as pulsating radio sources, while magnetars, neutron stars with the highest known magnetic fields, often emit short-duration X-ray bursts. Here we report simultaneous observations of the high-magnetic-field radio pulsar PSR J1119-6127 at X-ray, with XMM-Newton & NuSTAR, and at radio energies with Parkes radio telescope, during a period of magnetar-like bursts. The rotationally powered radio emission shuts off coincident with the occurrence of multiple X-ray bursts, and recovers on a time scale of ~70 seconds. These observations of related radio and X-ray phenomena further solidify the connection between radio pulsars and magnetars, and suggest that the pair plasma produced in bursts can disrupt the acceleration mechanism of radio emitting particles.
  • Whilst astronomy as a science is historically founded on observations at optical wavelengths, studying the Universe in other bands has yielded remarkable discoveries, from pulsars in the radio, signatures of the Big Bang at submm wavelengths, through to high energy emission from accreting, gravitationally-compact objects and the discovery of gamma-ray bursts. Unsurprisingly, the result of combining multiple wavebands leads to an enormous increase in diagnostic power, but powerful insights can be lost when the sources studied vary on timescales shorter than the temporal separation between observations in different bands. In July 2015, the workshop "Paving the way to simultaneous multi-wavelength astronomy" was held as a concerted effort to address this at the Lorentz Center, Leiden. It was attended by 50 astronomers from diverse fields as well as the directors and staff of observatories and spaced-based missions. This community white paper has been written with the goal of disseminating the findings of that workshop by providing a concise review of the field of multi-wavelength astronomy covering a wide range of important source classes, the problems associated with their study and the solutions we believe need to be implemented for the future of observational astronomy. We hope that this paper will both stimulate further discussion and raise overall awareness within the community of the issues faced in a developing, important field.
  • We present timing and spectral analysis of a sample of seven hard X-ray selected Cataclysmic Variable candidates based on simultaneous X-ray and optical observations collected with XMM-Newton , complemented with Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS hard X-ray data and ground-based optical photometry. For six sources, X-ray pulsations are detected for the first time in the range $\rm \sim296-6098\,s$, identifying them as members of the magnetic class. Swift J0927.7-6945, Swift J0958.0-4208, Swift J1701.3-4304, Swift J2113.5+5422, and possibly PBC J0801.2-4625, are Intermediate Polars (IPs), while Swift J0706.8+0325 is a short (1.7 h) orbital period Polar, the 11$^{\rm th}$ hard X-ray selected identified so far. X-ray orbital modulation is also observed in Swift J0927.7-6945 (5.2 h) and Swift J2113.5+5422 (4.1 h). Swift J1701.3-4304 is discovered as the longest orbital period (12.8 h) deep eclipsing IP. The spectra of the magnetic systems reveal optically thin multi-temperature emission between 0.2 and 60 keV. Energy dependent spin pulses and the orbital modulation in Swift J0927.7-6945 and Swift J2113.5+5422 are due to intervening local high density absorbing material ($\rm N_H\sim10^{22-23}\,cm^{-2}$). In Swift J0958.0-4208 and Swift J1701.3-4304, a soft X-ray blackbody (kT$\sim$50 and $\sim$80 eV) is detected, adding them to the growing group of "soft" IPs. White dwarf masses are determined in the range $\rm \sim0.58-1.18\,M_{\odot}$, indicating massive accreting primaries in five of them. Most sources accrete at rates lower than the expected secular value for their orbital period. Formerly proposed as a long-period (9.4 h) novalike CV, Swift J0746.3-1608 shows peculiar spectrum and light curves suggesting either an atypical low-luminosity CV or a low mass X-ray binary.
  • IGR J04571+4527 and Swift J0525.6+2416 are two hard X-ray sources detected in the Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS surveys. They were proposed to be magnetic cataclysmic variables of the Intermediate Polar (IP) type, based on optical spectroscopy. IGR J04571+4527 also showed a 1218 s optical periodicity, suggestive of the rotational period of a white dwarf, further pointing towards an IP classification. We here present detailed X-ray (0.3-10 keV) timing and spectral analysis performed with XMM-Newton, complemented with hard X-ray coverage (15-70 keV) from Swift/BAT. These are the first high signal to noise observations in the soft X-ray domain for both sources, allowing us to identify the white dwarf X-ray spin period of Swift J0525.6+2416 (226.28 s), and IGR J04571+4527 (1222.6 s). A model consisting of multi-temperature optically thin emission with complex absorption adequately fits the broad-band spectrum of both sources. We estimate a white dwarf mass of about 1.1 and 1.0 solar masses for IGR J04571+4527 and Swift J0525.6+2416, respectively. The above characteristics allow us to unambiguously classify both sources as IPs, confirming the high incidence of this subclass among hard X-ray emitting Cataclysmic Variables.
  • Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries associated with OB supergiant companions and characterised by an X-ray flaring behaviour whose dynamical range reaches 5 orders of magnitude on timescales of a few hundred to thousands of seconds. Current investigations concentrate on finding possible mechanisms to inhibit accretion in SFXTs and explain their unusually low average X-ray luminosity. We present the Swift observations of an exceptionally bright outburst displayed by the SFXT IGR J17544-2619 on 2014 October 10 when the source achieved a peak luminosity of $3\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. This extends the total source dynamic range to $\gtrsim$10$^6$, the largest (by a factor of 10) recorded so far from an SFXT. Tentative evidence for pulsations at a period of 11.6 s is also reported. We show that these observations challenge, for the first time, the maximum theoretical luminosity achievable by an SFXT and propose that this giant outburst was due to the formation of a transient accretion disc around the compact object.
  • This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of accreting white dwarfs. For a summary, we refer to the paper.
  • XTEJ1743-363 is a poorly known hard X-ray transient, that displays short and intense flares similar to those observed from Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients. The probable optical counterpart shows spectral properties similar to those of an M8 III giant, thus suggesting that XTEJ1743-363 belongs to the class of the Symbiotic X-ray Binaries. In this paper we report on the first dedicated monitoring campaign of the source in the soft X-ray range with XMM-Newton and Swift/XRT. T hese observations confirmed the association of XTEJ1743-363 with the previously suggested M8 III giant and the classification of the source as a member of the Symbiotic X-ray binaries. In the soft X-ray domain, XTEJ1743-363 displays a high absorption (~6x10^22 cm^-2 ) and variability on time scales of hundreds to few thousand seconds, typical of wind accreting systems. A relatively faint flare (peak X-ray flux 3x10^-11 erg/cm^2/s) lasting ~4 ks is recorded during the XMM-Newton observation and interpreted in terms of the wind accretion scenario.
  • We present new imaging and spectral analysis of the recently discovered extended X-ray emission around the high-magnetic-field rotating radio transient RRAT J1819-1458. We used two Chandra observations, taken on 2008 May 31 and 2011 May 28. The diffuse X-ray emission was detected with a significance of ~19sigma in the image obtained by combining the two observations. Long-term spectral variability has not been observed. Possible scenarios for the origin of this diffuse X-ray emission, further detailed in Camero-Arranz et al. (2012), are here discussed.
  • Phase-resolved spectroscopy of the newly discovered X-ray transient MAXI J0556-332 has revealed the presence of narrow emission lines in the Bowen region that most likely arise on the surface of the mass donor star in this low mass X-ray binary. A period search of the radial velocities of these lines provides two candidate orbital periods (16.43+/-0.12 and 9.754+/-0.048 hrs), which differ from any potential X-ray periods reported. Assuming that MAXI J0556-332 is a relatively high inclination system that harbors a precessing accretion disk in order to explain its X-ray properties, it is only possible to obtain a consistent set of system parameters for the longer period. These assumptions imply a mass ratio of q~0.45, a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the secondary of K_2~190 km/s and a compact object mass of the order of the canonical neutron star mass, making a black hole nature for MAXI J0556-332 unlikely. We also report the presence of strong N III emission lines in the spectrum, thereby inferring a high N/O abundance. Finally we note that the strength of all emission lines shows a continuing decay over the ~1 month of our observations.
  • We report here on the XMM-Newton observations of the three supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXT) XTE J1739-302, IGRJ08408-4503, and IGRJ18410-0535. For the latter source we only discuss some preliminary results of our data analysis. Some interpretation is provided for the timing and spectral behavior of the three sources in terms of the different theoretical models proposed so far to interpret the behavior of the SFXTs.
  • IGRJ18410-0535 is a supergiant fast X-ray transients. This subclass of supergiant X-ray binaries typically undergoes few- hour-long outbursts reaching luminosities of 10^(36)-10^(37) erg/s, the occurrence of which has been ascribed to the combined effect of the intense magnetic field and rotation of the compact object hosted in them and/or the presence of dense structures ("clumps") in the wind of their supergiant companion. IGR J18410-0535 was observed for 45 ks by XMM-Newton as part of a program designed to study the quiescent emission of supergiant fast X-ray transients and clarify the origin of their peculiar X-ray variability. We carried out an in-depth spectral and timing analysis of these XMM-Newton data. IGR J18410-0535 underwent a bright X-ray flare that started about 5 ks after the beginning of the observation and lasted for \sim15 ks. Thanks to the capabilities of the instruments on-board XMM-Newton, the whole event could be followed in great detail. The results of our analysis provide strong convincing evidence that the flare was produced by the accretion of matter from a massive clump onto the compact object hosted in this system. By assuming that the clump is spherical and moves at the same velocity as the homogeneous stellar wind, we estimate a mass and radius of Mcl \simeq1.4\times10^(22) g and Rcl \simeq8\times10^(11) cm. These are in qualitative agreement with values expected from theoretical calculations. We found no evidence of pulsations at \sim4.7 s after investigating coherent modulations in the range 3.5 ms-100 s. A reanalysis of the archival ASCA and Swift data of IGR J18410-0535, for which these pulsations were previously detected, revealed that they were likely to be due to a statistical fluctuation and an instrumental effect, respectively.
  • Massive black holes are believed to reside at the centres of most galaxies. They can be- come detectable by accretion of matter, either continuously from a large gas reservoir or impulsively from the tidal disruption of a passing star, and conversion of the gravitational energy of the infalling matter to light. Continuous accretion drives Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), which are known to be variable but have never been observed to turn on or off. Tidal disruption of stars by dormant massive black holes has been inferred indirectly but the on- set of a tidal disruption event has never been observed. Here we report the first discovery of the onset of a relativistic accretion-powered jet in the new extragalactic transient, Swift J164449.3+573451. The behaviour of this new source differs from both theoretical models of tidal disruption events and observations of the jet-dominated AGN known as blazars. These differences may stem from transient effects associated with the onset of a powerful jet. Such an event in the massive black hole at the centre of our Milky Way galaxy could strongly ionize the upper atmosphere of the Earth, if beamed towards us.
  • Context. Supergiant fast X-ray transients are a subclass of high mass X-ray binaries that host a neutron star accreting mass from the wind of its OB supergiant companion. They are characterized by an extremely pronounced and rapid variability in X-rays, which still lacks an unambiguous interpretation. A number of deep pointed observations with XMM-Newton have been carried out to study the quiescent emission of these sources and gain insight into the mechanism that causes their X-ray variability. Aims. We continued this study by using three XMM-Newton observations of the two supergiant fast X-ray transient prototypes XTEJ1739-302 and IGR J08408-4503 in quiescence. Methods. An in-depth timing and spectral analysis of these data have been carried out. Results. We found that the quiescent emission of these sources is characterized by both complex timing and spectral variability, with multiple small flares occurring sporadically after periods of lower X-ray emission. Some evidence is found in the XMM-Newton spectra of a soft component below ~2 keV, similar to that observed in the two supergiant fast X-ray transients AXJ1845.0-0433 and IGRJ16207-5129 and in many other high mass X-ray binaries. Conclusions.We suggest some possible interpretations of the timing and spectral properties of the quiescent emission of XTEJ1739- 302 and IGR J08408-4503 in the context of the different theoretical models proposed to interpret the behavior of the supergiant fast X-ray transients.
  • The supergiant fast X-ray transient source IGR J16479-4514 was observed in outburst two times with Swift. Its quiescent state was investigated in-depth only once in 2008 through a relatively long pointed observation with XMM-Newton. The latter observation was taken about 1.7 days after the outburst in 2008, and showed an X-ray eclipse-like event, likely caused by the supergiant companion. At present, this is the only supergiant fast X-ray transient that displayed an evidence for an X-ray eclipse. Here we carry out a comparison between the most recent outburst of IGRJ16479-4514, caught by Swift on 29 January 2009 and those detected previously from this source. The decay from the outbursts in 2005, 2008 and 2009 presents many similarities, and suggests a common mechanism that modulates the mass accretion rate onto the neutron star in IGRJ16479-4514.
  • IGR J18483-0311 was discovered with INTEGRAL in 2003 and later classified as a supergiant fast X-ray transient. It was observed in outburst many times, but its quiescent state is still poorly known. Here we present the results of XMM-Newton, Swift, and Chandra observations of IGRJ18483-0311. These data improved the X-ray position of the source, and provided new information on the timing and spectral properties of IGR J18483-0311 in quiescence. We report the detection of pulsations in the quiescent X-ray emission of this source, and give for the first time a measurement of the spin-period derivative of this source. In IGRJ18483-0311 the measured spin-period derivative of -(1.3+-0.3)x10^(-9) s/s likely results from light travel time effects in the binary. We compare the most recent observational results of IGRJ18483-0311 and SAXJ1818.6-1703, the two supergiant fast X-ray transients for which a similar orbital period has been measured.
  • We report on the first long (~32 ks) pointed XMM-Newton observation of the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGRJ16479-4514. Results from the timing, spectral and spatial analysis of this observation show that the X-ray source IGRJ16479-4514 underwent an episode of sudden obscuration, possibly an X-ray eclipse by the supergiant companion. We also found evidence for a soft X-ray extended halo around the source that is most readily interpreted as due to scattering by dust along the line of sight to IGRJ16479-4514.
  • aims: We obtained phase-resolved spectroscopy of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 during its outburst in 2008 to find a signature of the donor star, constrain its radial velocity semi-amplitude (K_2), and derive estimates on the pulsar mass. methods: Using Doppler images of the Bowen region we find a significant (>8sigma) compact spot at a position where the donor star is expected. If this is a signature of the donor star, we measure K_em=248+/-20 km/s (1sigma confidence) which represents a strict lower limit to K_2. Also, the Doppler map of He II lambda4686 shows the characteristic signature of the accretion disk, and there is a hint of enhanced emission that may be a result of tidal distortions in the accretion disk that are expected in very low mass ratio interacting binaries. results: The lower-limit on K_2 leads to a lower-limit on the mass function of f(M_1)>0.10M_sun. Applying the maximum K-correction gives 228<K_2<322 km/s and a mass ratio of 0.051<q<0.072. conclusions: Despite the limited S/N of the data we were able to detect a signature of the donor star in SAX J1808.4-3658, although future observations during a new outburst are still warranted to confirm this. If the derived K_em is correct, the largest uncertainty in the determination of the mass of the neutron star in SAX J1808.4-3658 using dynamical studies lies with the poorly known inclination.
  • Supergiant fast X-ray transients are a new class of high mass X-ray binaries recently discovered with INTEGRAL. Hours long outbursts from these sources have been observed on numerous occasions at luminosities of ~1E36-1E37 erg/s, whereas their low level activity at ~1E32-1E34 erg/s has not been deeply investigated yet due to the paucity of long pointed observations with high sensitivity X-ray telescopes. Here we report on the first long (~32 ks) pointed XMM-Newton observation of IGR J16479-4514, a member of this new class. This observation was carried out in March 2008, shortly after an outburst from this source, with the main goal of investigating its low level emission and physical mechanisms that drive the source activity. Results from the timing, spectral and spatial analysis of the EPIC-PN XMM-Newton observation show that the X-ray source IGRJ16479-4514 underwent an episode of sudden obscuration, possibly an X-ray eclipse by the supergiant companion. We also found evidence for a soft X-ray extended halo around the source that is most readily interpreted as due to scattering by dust along the line of sight to IGRJ16479-4514. We discuss this result in the context of the gated accretion scenarios that have been proposed to interpret the behaviour of supergiant fast X-ray transient.
  • 4U 2129+47 was discovered in the early 80's and classified as an accretion disk corona source due to its broad and partial X-ray eclipses. The 5.24 hr binary orbital period was inferred from the X-ray and optical light curve modulation, implying a late K or M spectral type companion star. The source entered a low state in 1983, during which the optical modulation disappeared and an F8 IV star was revealed, suggesting that 4U 2129+47 might be part of a triple system. The nature of 4U 2129+47 has since been investigated, but no definitive conclusion has been reached. Here, we present timing and spectral analyses of two XMM-Newton observations of this source, carried out in May and June, 2005. We find evidence for a delay between two mid-eclipse epochs measured ~22 days apart, and we show that this delay can be naturally explained as being due to the orbital motion of the binary 4U 2129+47 around the center of mass of a triple system. This result thus provides further support in favor of the triple nature of 4U 2129+47.
  • We analyze high resolution spectroscopic observations of the optical afterglow of GRB050730, obtained with UVES@VLT about hours after the GRB trigger. The spectrum shows that the ISM of the GRB host galaxy at z = 3.967 is complex, with at least five components contributing to the main absorption system. We detect strong CII*, SiII*, OI* and FeII* fine structure absorption lines associated to the second and third component. For the first three components we derive information on the relative distance from the site of the GRB explosion. Component 1, which has the highest redshift, does not present any fine structure nor low ionization lines; it only shows very high ionization features, such as CIV and OVI, suggesting that this component is very close to the GRB site. From the analysis of low and high ionization lines and fine structure lines, we find evidences that the distance of component 2 from the site of the GRB explosion is 10-100 times smaller than that of component 3. We evaluated the mean metallicity of the z=3.967 system obtaining values about 0.01 of the solar metallicity or less. However, this should not be taken as representative of the circumburst medium, since the main contribution to the hydrogen column density comes from the outer regions of the galaxy while that of the other elements presumably comes from the ISM closer to the GRB site. Furthermore, difficulties in evaluating dust depletion correction can modify significantly these values. The mean [C/Fe] ratio agrees well with that expected by single star-formation event models. Interestingly the [C/Fe] of component 2 is smaller than that of component 3, in agreement with GRB dust destruction scenarios, if component 2 is closer than component 3 to the GRB site.
  • Fast Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs, frequencies of $\sim 20 - 1840$ Hz) have been recently discovered in the ringing tail of giant flares from Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs), when the luminosity was of order $10^{41}-10^{41.5}$ erg/s. These oscillations persisted for many tens of seconds, remained coherent for up to hundreds of cycles and were observed over a wide range of rotational phases of the neutron stars believed to host SGRs. Therefore these QPOs must have originated from a compact, virtually non-expanding region inside the star's magnetosphere, emitting with a very moderate degree of beaming (if at all). The fastest QPOs imply a luminosity variation of $\Delta L/\Delta t \simeq 6 \times 10^{43}$ erg s$^{-2}$, the largest luminosity variation ever observed from a compact source. It exceeds by over an order of magnitude the usual Cavallo-Fabian-Rees (CFR) luminosity variability limit for a matter-to-radiation conversion efficiency of 100%. We show that such an extreme variability can be reconciled with the CFR limit if the emitting region is immersed in a magnetic field $\gtrsim 10^{15}$ G at the star surface, providing independent evidence for the superstrong magnetic fields of magnetars.