• Dense, continuous pulsar timing observations over a 24-hr period provide a method for probing intermediate gravitational wave (GW) frequencies from 10 microhertz to 20 millihertz. The European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA), and the combined International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) all use millisecond pulsar observations to detect or constrain GWs typically at nanohertz frequencies. In the case of the IPTA's nine-telescope 24-Hour Global Campaign on millisecond pulsar J1713+0747, GW limits in the intermediate frequency regime can be produced. The negligible change in dispersion measure during the observation minimizes red noise in the timing residuals, constraining any contributions from GWs due to individual sources. At 10$^{-5}$Hz, the 95% upper limit on strain is 10$^{-11}$ for GW sources in the pulsar's direction.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will make ground breaking discoveries in pulsar science. In this chapter we outline the SKA surveys for new pulsars, as well as how we will perform the necessary follow-up timing observations. The SKA's wide field-of-view, high sensitivity, multi-beaming and sub-arraying capabilities, coupled with advanced pulsar search backends, will result in the discovery of a large population of pulsars. These will enable the SKA's pulsar science goals (tests of General Relativity with pulsar binary systems, investigating black hole theorems with pulsar-black hole binaries, and direct detection of gravitational waves in a pulsar timing array). Using SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW we will survey the Milky Way to unprecedented depth, increasing the number of known pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. SKA2 will potentially find all the Galactic radio-emitting pulsars in the SKA sky which are beamed in our direction. This will give a clear picture of the birth properties of pulsars and of the gravitational potential, magnetic field structure and interstellar matter content of the Galaxy. Targeted searches will enable detection of exotic systems, such as the ~1000 pulsars we infer to be closely orbiting Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Centre. In addition, the SKA's sensitivity will be sufficient to detect pulsars in local group galaxies. To derive the spin characteristics of the discoveries we will perform live searches, and use sub-arraying and dynamic scheduling to time pulsars as soon as they are discovered, while simultaneously continuing survey observations. The large projected number of discoveries suggests that we will uncover currently unknown rare systems that can be exploited to push the boundaries of our understanding of astrophysics and provide tools for testing physics, as has been done by the pulsar community in the past.
  • The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both Northern and Southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (~10^-9 to 10^-8 Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to search for gravitational waves emitted from coalescing supermassive binary black-hole systems in the centres of merging galaxies and discuss the status of the project.
  • We are currently undertaking a survey to search for new pulsars and the recently found Rotating RAdio Transcients (RRATs) in the Cygnus OB complex. The survey uses the Westerbrok Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in a unique way called the 8gr8 mode, which gives it the best efficiency of any low-frequency wide-area survey. So far we have found a few new pulsars and the routines for the detection of RRATs are already implemented in the standard reduction. We expect to find a few tens of new pulsars and a similar number of RRATs. This will help us to improve our knowledge about the population and properties of the latter poorly known objects as well as provide an improved knowledge of the number of young pulsars associated with the OB complexes in the Cygnus region.
  • We evaluate the contribution to the nucleon-nucleon interaction due to correlated $\pi\rho$ exchange in the $\pi$, $\omega$, and $A_1$/$H_1$ channels by means of dispersion-theoretic methods based on a realistic meson exchange model for the interaction between $\pi$ and $\rho$ mesons. These processes have substantial effects: In the pionic channel it counterbalances the suppression generated by a soft $\pi NN$ form factor of monopole type with a cutoff mass of about 1 GeV; in the $\omega$-channel it provides nearly half of the empirical repulsion, leaving little room for explicit quark-gluon effects.
  • Meson-meson correlation effects are investigated in the $\NNb\to\rho\pi$ annihilation process using a realistic meson-exchange model for the $\rho\pi$ interaction determined previously, together with a conventional baryon-exchange transition model and a consistent $\NNb$ interaction. For $\NNb$ $S$-states, they have a drastic effect and bring the relative (${^1S_0}/{^3S_1}$) branching ratio up to the experimental value, thus resolving the long-standing so-called ``$\rho\pi$'' puzzle. For $\NNb$ $P$-states, their effect is of minor importance, and discrepancies remain for those ratios involving annihilation from the $\NNb({^3P_J})$ state to $\rho\pi(l'=2)$.
  • We investigate the structure of the scalar mesons $f_0(975)$ and $a_0(980)$ within realistic meson-exchange models of the $\pi\pi$ and $\pi\eta$ interactions. Starting from a modified version of the J\"ulich model for $\pi\pi$ scattering we perform an analysis of the pole structure of the resulting scattering amplitude and find, in contrast to existing models, a somewhat large mass for the $f_0(975)$ ($m_{f_0}=1015$ MeV, $\Gamma_{f_0}=30$ MeV). It is shown that our model provides a description of $J/\psi\rightarrow\phi\pi\pi/\phi KK$ data comparable in quality with those of alternative models. Furthermore, the formalism developed for the $\pi\pi$ system is consistently extended to the $\pi\eta$ interaction leading to a description of the $a_0(980)$ as a dynamically generated threshold effect (which is therefore neither a conventional $q\overline{q}$ state nor a $K\overline{K}$ bound state). Exploring the corresponding pole position the $a_0(980)$ is found to be rather broad ($m_{a_0}=991$ MeV, $\Gamma_{a_0}=202$ MeV). The experimentally observed smaller width results from the influence of the nearby $K\overline{K}$ threshold on this pole.