• Of the two solar lines, K I $D_1$ and $D_2$, almost all attention so far has been devoted to the $D_1$ line, as $D_2$ is severely affected by an O$_2$ atmospheric band. This, however, makes the latter appealing for balloon and space observations from above (most of) the Earth's atmosphere. We estimate the residual effect of the O$_2$ band on the K I $D_2$ line at altitudes typical for stratospheric balloons. Our aim is to study the feasibility of observing the 770 nm window. Specifically, this paper serves as a preparation for the third flight of the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory. The results indicate that the absorption by O$_2$ is still present, albeit much weaker, at the expected balloon altitude. We applied the obtained O$_2$ transmittance to K I $D_2$ synthetic polarimetric spectra and found that in the absence of line-of-sight motions, the residual O$_2$ has a negligible effect on the K I $D_2$ line. On the other hand, for Doppler-shifted K I $D_2$ data, the residual O$_2$ might alter the shape of the Stokes profiles. However, the residual O$_2$ absorption is sufficiently weak at stratospheric levels that it can be divided out if appropriate measurements are made, something that is impossible at ground level. Therefore, for the first time with Sunrise III, we will be able to perform polarimetric observations of the K I $D_2$ line and, consequently, we will have improved access to the thermodynamics and magnetic properties of the upper photosphere from observations of the K I lines.
  • The ice giants Uranus and Neptune are the least understood class of planets in our solar system but the most frequently observed type of exoplanets. Presumed to have a small rocky core, a deep interior comprising ~70% heavy elements surrounded by a more dilute outer envelope of H2 and He, Uranus and Neptune are fundamentally different from the better-explored gas giants Jupiter and Saturn. Because of the lack of dedicated exploration missions, our knowledge of the composition and atmospheric processes of these distant worlds is primarily derived from remote sensing from Earth-based observatories and space telescopes. As a result, Uranus's and Neptune's physical and atmospheric properties remain poorly constrained and their roles in the evolution of the Solar System not well understood. Exploration of an ice giant system is therefore a high-priority science objective as these systems (including the magnetosphere, satellites, rings, atmosphere, and interior) challenge our understanding of planetary formation and evolution. Here we describe the main scientific goals to be addressed by a future in situ exploration of an ice giant. An atmospheric entry probe targeting the 10-bar level, about 5 scale heights beneath the tropopause, would yield insight into two broad themes: i) the formation history of the ice giants and, in a broader extent, that of the Solar System, and ii) the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. The probe would descend under parachute to measure composition, structure, and dynamics, with data returned to Earth using a Carrier Relay Spacecraft as a relay station. In addition, possible mission concepts and partnerships are presented, and a strawman ice-giant probe payload is described. An ice-giant atmospheric probe could represent a significant ESA contribution to a future NASA ice-giant flagship mission.
  • May 30, 2017 astro-ph.EP
    We present a summary of the campaign of remote observations that supported the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. Telescopes across the globe (and in space) followed comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from before Rosetta's arrival until nearly the end of mission in September 2016. These provided essential data for mission planning, large-scale context information for the coma and tails beyond the spacecraft, and a way to directly compare 67P with other comets. The observations revealed 67P to be a relatively `well behaved' comet, typical of Jupiter family comets and with activity patterns that repeat from orbit-to-orbit. Comparison between this large collection of telescopic observations and the in situ results from Rosetta will allow us to better understand comet coma chemistry and structure. This work is just beginning as the mission ends -- in this paper we present a summary of the ground-based observations and early results, and point to many questions that will be addressed in future studies.
  • The Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2 (103P) was the target of the NASA EPOXI mission. In support of this mission, we conducted observations from radio to submillimeter wavelengths of comet 103P in the three weeks preceding the spacecraft rendezvous on UT 2010 November 4.58. This time period included the passage at perihelion and the closest approach of the comet to the Earth. Here we report detections of HCN, H2CO, CS, and OH and upper limits for HNC and DCN towards 103P, using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12m telescope (ARO 12m) and submillimeter telescope (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) and the Greenbank Telescope (GBT). The water production rate, QH2O = (0.67 - 1.07) x 10^28 s^-1, was determined from the GBT OH data. From the average abundance ratios of HCN and H2CO relative to water (0.13 +/- 0.03 % and 0.14 +/- 0.03 %, respectively), we conclude that H2CO is depleted and HCN is normal with respect to typically-observed cometary mixing ratios. However, the abundance ratio of HCN with water shows a large diversity with time. Using the JCMT data we measured an upper limit for the DCN/HCN ratio <0.01. Consecutive observations of ortho- H2CO and para-H2CO on November 2 (from data obtained at the JCMT), allowed us to derive an ortho : para ratio (OPR) ~ 2.12 +/- 0.59 (1sigma), corresponding to Tspin > 8 K (2sigma).
  • The line emission in the coma was measured in the comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), that were observed on five consecutive nights, 7-11 May 2004, at heliocentric distances of 1.0 and 0.7 AU, respectively, by means of high-resolution spectroscopy using the 10-m Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We present a search for six parent- and product-volatile species (HCN, H2CO, CO, CS, CH3OH, and HNC) in both comets. Multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 5-4 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We derive rotational temperatures of 54(9) K for C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and 119(34) K for C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) that are roughly consistent with observations of other comets at similar distances from the Sun. The gas production rates of material are computed using a spherically symmetric molecular excitation code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons. We find an HCN production rate of 2.96(5)e26 molec.s-1 for comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), corresponding to a mixing ratio with respect to H2O of 1.12(2)e-3. The mean HCN production rate during the observing period is 4.54(10)e26 molec.s-1 for comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), which gives a Q_HCN/Q_H2O mixing ratio of 1.51(3)e-3. With systematically lower mixing ratios in comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), production rate ratios of the observed species with respect to H2O lie within the typical ranges of dynamically new comets in both objects. We find a relative low abundance of CO in C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) compared to the observed range in other comets based on millimeter/submillimeter observations, and a significant upper limit on the CO production in C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) is derived. Depletion of CO suggests partial evaporation from the surface layers during previous visits to the outer Solar System and agrees with previous measurements of dynamically new comets.
  • We aim to determine the production rates of several parent and product volatiles and the 12C/13C isotopic carbon ratio in the long-period comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), which is likely to originate from the Oort Cloud. The line emission from several molecules in the coma was measured with high signal-to-noise ratio in January 2005 at heliocentric distance of 1.2 AU by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We have obtained production rates of several volatiles (CH3OH, HCN, H13CN, HNC, H2CO, CO and CS) by comparing the observed and simulated line-integrated intensities. Furthermore, multiline observations of the CH3OH (7-6) series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We find that the CH3OH population distribution of the levels sampled by these lines can be described by a rotational temperature of 40 \pm 3 K. Derived mixing ratios relative to hydrogen cyanide are CO/CH3OH/H2CO/CS/HNC/H13CN/HCN = 30.9/24.6/4.8/0.57/0.031/0.013/1 assuming a pointing offset of 8" due to the uncertain ephemeris at the time of the observations and the telescope pointing error. The measured relative molecular abundances in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) are between low- to typical values of those obtained in Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that it has visited the inner solar system previously and undergone thermal processing. The HNC/HCN abundance ratio of ~3.1% is comparable to that found in other comets, accounting for the dependence on the heliocentric distance, and could possibly be explained by ion-molecule chemical processes in the low-temperature atmosphere. From a tentative H13CN detection, the measured value of 97 \pm 30 for the H12CN/H13CN isotopologue pair is consistent with a telluric value.
  • We present spectral and spatial information for major volatile species in Comet 10P/Tempel 2, based on high-dispersion infrared spectra acquired on UT 2010 July 26 (heliocentric distance Rh = 1.44 AU) and September 18 (Rh = 1.62 AU), following the comet's perihelion passage on UT 2010 July 04. The total production rate for water on July 26 was (1.90 +/- 0.12) x 10^28 molecules s-1, and abundances of six trace gases (relative to water) were: CH3OH (1.58% +/- 0.23), C2H6 (0.39% +/- 0.04), NH3 (0.83% +/- 0.20), and HCN (0.13% +/- 0.02). A detailed analysis of intensities for water emission lines provided a rotational temperature of 35 +/- 3 K. The mean OPR is consistent with nuclear spin populations in statistical equilibrium (OPR = 3.01 +/- 0.18), and the (1-sigma) lower bound corresponds to a spin temperature > 38 K. Our measurements were contemporaneous with a jet-like feature observed at optical wavelengths. The spatial profiles of four primary volatiles display strong enhancements in the jet direction, which favors release from a localized vent on the nucleus. The measured IR continuum is much more sharply peaked and is consistent with a dominant contribution from the nucleus itself. The peak intensities for H2O, CH3OH, and C2H6 are offset by ~200 km in the jet direction, suggesting the possible existence of a distributed source, such as the release of icy grains that subsequently sublimed in the coma. On UT September 18, no obvious emission lines were present in our spectra, nevertheless we obtained a 3-sigma upper limit Q(H2O) < 2.86 x 10^27 molecules s-1.
  • We quantified ten parent volatiles in comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) before perihelion, through high-dispersion infrared spectra acquired with CRIRES at ESO's VLT on UT 2011 August 07 (Rh = 2.4 AU) and September 17-21 (Rh = 2.0 AU). On August 07, water was searched but not detected at an upper limit (3{\sigma}) of 2.1 \times 10^28 s-1, while ethane was detected with a production rate of 6.1 \times 10^26 s-1 (apparent mixing ratio > 2.90%). On September 17-21, the mean production rate for water was 8.4 \times 10^28 s-1, and abundance ratios (relative to water) of detected trace species were: CO (12.51%), CH3OH (3.90%), CH4 (1.24%), C2H6 (1.01%) and HCN (0.36%). Upper limits (3{\sigma}) to abundances for four minor species were: NH3 (1.55%), C2H2 (0.13%), HDO (0.89%) and OCS (0.20%). Given the relatively large heliocentric distance, we explored the effect of water not being fully sublimated within our FOV and identified the 'missing' water fraction needed to reconcile the retrieved abundance ratios with the mean values found for "organics-normal". The individual spatial profiles of parent volatiles and the continuum displayed rather asymmetric outgassing. Indications of H2O and CO gas being released in different directions suggest different active vents and/or the possible existence of polar and apolar ice aggregates in the nucleus. The high fractional abundance of CO identifies comet C/2009 P1 as a CO-rich comet.
  • We report measurements of eight primary volatiles (H2O, HCN, CH4, C2H6, CH3OH, C2H2, H2CO, and NH3) and two product species (OH and NH2) in comet 103P/Hartley-2 using high dispersion infrared spectroscopy. We quantified the long- and short-term behavior of volatile release over a three-month interval that encompassed the comet's close approach to Earth, its perihelion passage, and flyby of the comet by the Deep Impact spacecraft during the EPOXI mission. We present production rates for individual species, their mixing ratios relative to water, and their spatial distributions in the coma on multiple dates. The production rates for water, ethane, HCN, and methanol vary in a manner consistent with independent measures of nucleus rotation, but mixing ratios for HCN, C2H6, & CH3OH are independent of rotational phase. Our results demonstrate that the ensemble average composition of gas released from the nucleus is well defined, and relatively constant over the three-month interval (September 18 through December 17). If individual vents vary in composition, enough diverse vents must be active simultaneously to approximate (in sum) the bulk composition of the nucleus. The released primary volatiles exhibit diverse spatial properties which favor the presence of separate polar and apolar ice phases in the nucleus, establish dust and gas release from icy clumps (and also, directly from the nucleus), and provide insights into the driver for the cyanogen (CN) polar jet. The spatial distributions of C2H6 & HCN along the near-polar jet (UT 19.5 October) and nearly orthogonal to it (UT 22.5 October) are discussed relative to the origin of CN. The ortho-para ratio (OPR) of water was 2.85 \pm 0.20; the lower bound (2.65) defines Tspin > 32 K. These values are consistent with results returned from ISO in 1997.
  • We observed comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) twice on UT 28 January 2009, using the UV grism of the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma Ray Burst space observatory. Grism spectroscopy provides spatially resolved spectroscopy over large apertures for faint objects. We developed a novel methodology to analyze grism observations of comets, and applied a Haser comet model to extract production rates of OH, CS, NH, CN, C3, C2, and dust. The water production rates retrieved from two visits on this date were $6.7 \pm 0.7$ and 7.9 $\pm$ 0.7 x 1E28 molecules s-1, respectively. Jets were sought (but not found) in the white-light and `OH' images reported here, suggesting that the jets reported by Knight and Schleicher (2009) are unique to CN. Based on the abundances of its carbon-bearing species, comet Lulin is `typical' (i.e., not `depleted') in its composition.
  • We measured organic volatiles (CH4, CH3OH, C2H6, H2CO), CO, and water in comet 8P/Tuttle, a comet from the Oort cloud reservoir now in a short-period Halley-type orbit. We compare its composition with two other comets in Halley-type orbits, and with comets of the "organics-normal" and "organics-depleted" classes. Chemical gradients are expected in the comet-forming region of the proto-planetary disk, and an individual comet should reflect its specific heritage. If Halley-type comets came from the inner Oort cloud as proposed, we see no common characteristics that could distinguish such comets from those that were stored in the outer Oort cloud.
  • We report measurements of eight native (i.e., released directly from the comet nucleus) volatiles (H2O, HCN, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, CO, H2CO, and CH3OH) in comet 8P/Tuttle using NIRSPEC at Keck 2. Comet Tuttle reveals a truly unusual composition, distinct from that of any comet observed to date at infrared wavelengths. The prominent enrichment of methanol relative to water contrasts the depletions of other molecules, especially C2H2 and HCN. We suggest that the nucleus of 8P/Tuttle may contain two cometesimals characterized by distinct volatile composition. The relative abundances C2/CN, C2/OH, and CN/OH in 8P/Tuttle (measured at optical/near-UV wavelengths) differ substantially from the mixing ratios of their potential parents (C2H2/HCN, C2H2/H2O, and HCN/H2O) found in this work. Based on this comparison, our results do not support C2H2 and HCN being the principal precursors for respectively C2 and CN in Tuttle. The peculiar native composition observed in 8P/Tuttle (compared to other comets) provides new strong evidence for chemical diversity in the volatile materials stored in comet nuclei. We discuss the implications of this diversity for expected variations in the deuterium enrichment of water among comets.