• The assessment of the frequency of planetary systems reproducing the Solar System's architecture is still an open problem. Detailed study of multiplicity and architecture is generally hampered by limitations in quality, temporal extension and observing strategy, causing difficulties in detecting low-mass inner planets in the presence of outer giant planetary bodies. We present the results of high-cadence and high-precision HARPS observations on 20 solar-type stars known to host a single long-period giant planet in order to search for additional inner companions and estimate the occurence rate $f_p$ of scaled Solar System analogs, i.e. systems featuring lower-mass inner planets in the presence of long-period giant planets. We carry out combined fits of our HARPS data with literature radial velocities using differential evolution MCMC to refine the literature orbital solutions and search for additional inner planets. We then derive the survey detection limits to provide preliminary estimates of $f_p$. We generally find better constrained orbital parameters for the known planets than those found in the literature. While no additional inner planet is detected, we find evidence for previously unreported long-period massive companions in systems HD 50499 and HD 73267. We finally estimate the frequency of inner low mass (10-30 M$_\oplus$) planets in the presence of outer giant planets as $f_p<9.84\%$ for P<150 days. Our preliminary estimate of $f_p$ is significantly lower than the values found in the literature; the lack of inner candidate planets found in our sample can also be seen as evidence corroborating the inward migration formation model for super-Earths and mini-Neptunes. Our results also underline the need for high-cadence and high-precision follow-up observations as the key to precisely determine the occurence of Solar System analogs.
  • On 4 July 2005 at 05:52 UT, the impactor of NASA's Deep Impact (DI) mission crashed into comet 9P/Tempel 1 with a velocity of about 10 km/s. The material ejected by the impact expanded into the normal coma, produced by ordinary cometary activity. The characteristics of the non-impact coma and cloud produced by the impact were studied by observations in the visible wavelengths and in the near-IR. The scattering characteristics of the "normal" coma of solid particles were studied by comparing images in various spectral regions, from the UV to the near-IR. For the non-impact coma, a proxy of the dust production has been measured in various spectral regions. The presence of sublimating grains has been detected. Their lifetime was found to be about 11 hours. Regarding the cloud produced by the impact, the total geometric cross section multiplied by the albedo was measured as a function of the color and time. The projected velocity appeared to obey a Gaussian distribution with the average velocity of the order of 115 m/s. By comparing the observations taken about 3 hours after the impact, we have found a strong decrease in the cross section in J filter, while that in Ks remained almost constant. This is interpreted as the result of sublimation of grains dominated by particles of sizes of the order of some microns.