• Using data from the GALAH pilot survey, we determine properties of the Galactic thin and thick disks near the solar neighbourhood. The data cover a small range of Galactocentric radius ($7.9 \leq R_\mathrm{GC} \leq 9.5$ kpc), but extend up to 4 kpc in height from the Galactic plane, and several kpc in the direction of Galactic anti-rotation (at longitude $260 ^\circ \leq \ell \leq 280^\circ$). This allows us to reliably measure the vertical density and abundance profiles of the chemically and kinematically defined `thick' and `thin' disks of the Galaxy. The thin disk (low-$\alpha$ population) exhibits a steep negative vertical metallicity gradient, at d[M/H]/d$z=-0.18 \pm 0.01$ dex kpc$^{-1}$, which is broadly consistent with previous studies. In contrast, its vertical $\alpha$-abundance profile is almost flat, with a gradient of d[$\alpha$/M]/d$z$ = $0.008 \pm 0.002$ dex kpc$^{-1}$. The steep vertical metallicity gradient of the low-$\alpha$ population is in agreement with models where radial migration has a major role in the evolution of the thin disk. The thick disk (high-$\alpha$ population) has a weaker vertical metallicity gradient d[M/H]/d$z = -0.058 \pm 0.003$ dex kpc$^{-1}$. The $\alpha$-abundance of the thick disk is nearly constant with height, d[$\alpha$/M]/d$z$ = $0.007 \pm 0.002$ dex kpc$^{-1}$. The negative gradient in metallicity and the small gradient in [$\alpha$/M] indicate that the high-$\alpha$ population experienced a settling phase, but also formed prior to the onset of major SNIa enrichment. We explore the implications of the distinct $\alpha$-enrichments and narrow [$\alpha$/M] range of the sub-populations in the context of thick disk formation.
  • It has been well established that Galactic Globular clusters (GCs) harbour more than one stellar population, distinguishable by the anti-correlations of light element abundances (C-N, Na-O, and Mg-Al). These studies have been extended recently to the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). Here we investigate the AGB of NGC 6397 for the first time. We have performed an abundance analysis of high-resolution spectra of 47 RGB and 8 AGB stars, deriving Fe, Na, O, Mg and Al abundances. We find that NGC 6397 shows no evidence of a deficit in Na-rich AGB stars, as reported for some other GCs - the subpopulation ratios of the AGB and RGB in NGC 6397 are identical, within uncertainties. This agrees with expectations from stellar theory. This GC acts as a control for our earlier work on the AGB of M 4 (with contrasting results), since the same tools and methods were used.
  • We confirm the reality of the recently discovered Milky Way stellar cluster $\textit{Gaia}$ 1 using spectra acquired with the HERMES and AAOmega spectrographs of the Anglo-Australian Telescope. This cluster had been previously undiscovered due to its close angular proximity to Sirius, the brightest star in the sky at visual wavelengths. Our observations identified 41 cluster members, and yielded an overall metallicity of [Fe/H]$=-0.13\pm0.13$ and barycentric radial velocity of $v_r=58.30\pm0.22$ km/s. These kinematics provide a dynamical mass estimate of $12.9^{+4.6}_{-3.9}\times10^3$ M$_{\odot}$. Isochrone fits to $\textit{Gaia}$, 2MASS, and Pan-STARRS1 photometry indicate that $\textit{Gaia}$ 1 is an intermediate age ($\sim3$ Gyr) stellar cluster. Combining the spatial and kinematic data we calculate $\textit{Gaia}$ 1 has a circular orbit with a radius of about 12~kpc, but with a large out of plane motion: $z_\textrm{max}=1.1^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$ kpc. Clusters with such orbits are unlikely to survive long due to the number of plane passages they would experience.
  • A recent study reported a strong apparent depression of Fe I, relative to Fe II, in the AGB stars of NGC 6752. This depression is much greater than that expected from the neglect of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects, in particular the dominant effect of overionisation. Here we attempt to reproduce the apparent Fe discrepancy, and investigate differences in reported sodium abundances. We compare in detail the methods and results of the recent study with those of an earlier study of NGC 6752 AGB stars. Iron and sodium abundances are derived using Fe I, Fe II, and Na I lines. Various uncertainties are explored. We reproduce the large Fe I depression found by the recent study, using different observational data and computational tools. Further investigation shows that the degree of the apparent Fe I depression is strongly dependent on the adopted stellar effective temperature. To minimise uncertainties in Fe I we derive temperatures for each star individually using the infrared flux method (IRFM). We find that the $T_{\rm{eff}}$ scales used by both the previous studies are cooler, by up to 100 K; such underestimated temperatures amplify the apparent Fe I depression. Our IRFM temperatures result in negligible apparent depression, consistent with theory. We also re-derived sodium abundances and, remarkably, found them to be unaffected by the new temperature scale. [Na/H] in the AGB stars is consistent between all studies. Since Fe is constant, it follows that [Na/Fe] is also consistent between studies, apart from any systematic offsets in Fe. We recommend the use of $(V-K)$ relations for AGB stars. We plan to investigate the effect of the improved temperature scale on other elements, and re-evaluate the subpopulation distributions on the AGB, in the next paper of this series. [abridged]
  • Galactic Globular clusters (GCs) are now known to harbour multiple stellar populations, which are chemically distinct in many light element abundances. It is becoming increasingly clear that asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in GCs show different abundance distributions in light elements compared to those in the red giant branch (RGB) and other phases, skewing toward more primordial, field-star-like abundances, which we refer to as subpopulation one (SP1). As part of a larger program targeting giants in GCs, we obtained high-resolution spectra for a sample of 106 RGB and 15 AGB stars in Messier 4 (NGC 6121) using the 2dF+HERMES facility on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In this Letter we report an extreme paucity of AGB stars with [Na/O] > -0.17 in M4, which contrasts with the RGB that has abundances up to [Na/O] =0.55. The AGB abundance distribution is consistent with all AGB stars being from SP1. This result appears to imply that all subpopulation two stars (SP2; Na-rich, O-poor) avoid the AGB phase. This is an unexpected result given M4's horizontal branch morphology -- it does not have an extended blue horizontal branch. This is the first abundance study to be performed utilising the HERMES spectrograph.
  • We present an analysis of the relative throughputs of the 3.9-metre Anglo-Australian Telescope's 2dF/HERMES system, based upon spectra acquired during the first two years of the GALAH survey. Averaged spectral fluxes of stars were compared to their photometry to determine the relative throughputs of fibres for a range of fibre position and atmospheric conditions. We find that overall the throughputs of the 771 usable fibres have been stable over the first two years of its operation. About 2.5 per cent of fibres have throughputs much lower than the average. There are also a number of yet unexplained variations between the HERMES bandpasses, and mechanically & optically linked fibre groups known as retractors or slitlets related to regions of the focal plane. These findings do not impact the science that HERMES will produce.
  • We report the identification of extended tidal debris potentially associated with the globular cluster NGC 3201, using the RAVE catalogue. We find the debris stars are located at a distance range of 1-7 kpc based on the forthcoming RAVE distance estimates. The derived space velocities and integrals of motion show interesting connections to NGC 3201, modulo uncertainties in the proper motions. Three stars, which are among the 4 most likely candidates for NGC 3201 tidal debris, are separated by 80 degrees on the sky yet are well matched by the 12 Gyr, [Fe/H] = -1.5 isochrone appropriate for the cluster. This is the first time tidal debris around this cluster has been reported over such a large spatial extent, with implications for the cluster$'$s origin and dynamical evolution.
  • Open clusters are historically regarded as single-aged stellar populations representative of star formation within the Galactic disk. Recent literature has questioned this view, based on discrepant Na abundances relative to the field, and concerns about the longevity of bound clusters contributing to a selection bias: perhaps long-lived open clusters are chemically different to the star formation events that contributed to the Galactic disk. We explore a large sample of high resolution Na, O, Ba & Eu abundances from the literature, homogenized as much as reasonable including accounting for NLTE effects, variations in analysis and choice of spectral lines. Compared to a template globular cluster and representative field stars, we find no significant abundance trends, confirming that the process producing the Na-O anti-correlation in globular clusters is not present in open clusters. Furthermore, previously reported Na-enhancement of open clusters is found to be an artefact of NLTE effects, with the open clusters matching a subset of chemically tagged field stars.
  • Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) constitute an interesting extreme in the range of environments in which galaxies are located, as the space density of galaxies in these small groups are otherwise only found in the centres of much larger clusters. The work presented here uses Lick indices to make a comparison of ages and chemical compositions of galaxies in HCGs with those in other environments (clusters, loose groups and the field). The metallicity and relative abundance of `$\alpha$-elements' show strong correlations with galaxy age and central velocity dispersion, with similar trends found in all environments. However, we show that the previously reported correlation between $\alpha$-element abundance ratios and velocity dispersion disappears when a full account is taken of the the abundance ratio pattern in the calibration stars. This correlation is thus found to be an artifact of incomplete calibration to the Lick system. Variations are seen in the ranges and average values of age, metallicity and $\alpha$-element abundance ratios for galaxies in different environments. Age distributions support the hierarchical formation prediction that field galaxies are on average younger than their cluster counterparts. However, the ages of HCG galaxies are shown to be more similar to those of cluster galaxies than those in the field, contrary to the expectations of current hierarchical models. A trend for lower velocity dispersion galaxies to be younger was also seen. This is again inconsistent with hierarchical collapse models, but is qualitatively consistent with the latest N-body-SPH models based on monolithic collapse in which star formation continues for many Gyr in low mass halos.