• We present a 69 arcmin$^2$ ALMA survey at 1.1mm, GOODS-ALMA, matching the deepest HST-WFC3 H-band part of the GOODS-South field. We taper the 0"24 original image with a homogeneous and circular synthesized beam of 0"60 to reduce the number of independent beams - thus reducing the number of purely statistical spurious detections - and optimize the sensitivity to point sources. We extract a catalogue of galaxies purely selected by ALMA and identify sources with and without HST counterparts. ALMA detects 20 sources brighter than 0.7 mJy at 1.1mm in the 0"60 tapered mosaic (rms sensitivity $\sigma \simeq$ 0.18 mJy/beam) with a purity greater than 80%. Among these detections, we identify three sources with no HST nor Spitzer-IRAC counterpart, consistent with the expected number of spurious galaxies from the analysis of the inverted image; their definitive status will require additional investigation. An additional three sources with HST counterparts are detected either at high significance in the higher resolution map, or with different detection-algorithm parameters ensuring a purity greater than 80%. Hence we identify in total 20 robust detections. Our wide contiguous survey allows us to push further in redshift the blind detection of massive galaxies with ALMA with a median redshift of $\bar{z}$ = 2.92 and a median stellar mass of $\overline{M_{\star}}$ = 1.1 $\times 10^{11}$M$_\odot$. Our sample includes 20% HST-dark galaxies (4 out of 20), all detected in the mid-infrared with Spitzer-IRAC. The near-infrared based photometric redshifts of two of them ($z \sim$4.3 and 4.8) suggest that these sources have redshifts $z >$ 4. At least 40% of the ALMA sources host an X-ray AGN, compared to $\sim$14% for other galaxies of similar mass and redshift. The wide area of our ALMA survey provides lower values at the bright end of number counts than single-dish telescopes affected by confusion.
  • Early type galaxies (ETG) contain most of the stars present in the local Universe and, above a stellar mass of ~5e10 Msun, vastly outnumber spiral galaxies like the Milky Way. These massive spheroidal galaxies have, in the present day, very little gas or dust, and their stellar populations have been evolving passively for over 10 billion years. The physical mechanisms that led to the termination of star formation in these galaxies and depletion of their interstellar medium remain largely conjectural. In particular, there are currently no direct measurements of the amount of residual gas that might be still present in newly quiescent spheroids at high redshift. Here we show that quiescent ETGs at z~1.8, close to their epoch of quenching, contained 2-3 orders of magnitude more dust at fixed stellar mass than local ETGs. This implies the presence of substantial amounts of gas (5-10%), which was however consumed less efficiently than in more active galaxies, probably due to their spheroidal morphology, and consistently with our simulations. This lower star formation efficiency, and an extended hot gas halo possibly maintained by persistent feedback from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), combine to keep ETGs mostly passive throughout cosmic time.
  • We analyse the velocity dispersion properties of 472 z~0.9 star-forming galaxies observed as part of the KMOS Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS). The majority of this sample is rotationally dominated (83 +/- 5% with v_C/sigma_0 > 1) but also dynamically hot and highly turbulent. After correcting for beam smearing effects, the median intrinsic velocity dispersion for the final sample is sigma_0 = 43.2 +/- 0.8 km/s with a rotational velocity to dispersion ratio of v_C/sigma_0 = 2.6 +/- 0.1. To explore the relationship between velocity dispersion, stellar mass, star formation rate and redshift we combine KROSS with data from the SAMI survey (z~0.05) and an intermediate redshift MUSE sample (z~0.5). While there is, at most, a weak trend between velocity dispersion and stellar mass, at fixed mass there is a strong increase with redshift. At all redshifts, galaxies appear to follow the same weak trend of increasing velocity dispersion with star formation rate. Our results are consistent with an evolution of galaxy dynamics driven by disks that are more gas rich, and increasingly gravitationally unstable, as a function of increasing redshift. Finally, we test two analytic models that predict turbulence is driven by either gravitational instabilities or stellar feedback. Both provide an adequate description of the data, and further observations are required to rule out either model.
  • We present dynamical measurements for 586 H-alpha detected star-forming galaxies from the KMOS (K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph) Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS). The sample represents typical star-forming galaxies at this redshift (z=0.6-1.0), with a median star formation rate of ~7 Msol/yr and a stellar mass range of log[M/Msol]~9-11. We find that the rotation velocity-stellar mass relationship (the inverse of the Tully-Fisher relationship) for our rotationally-dominated sources (v/sigma>1) has a consistent slope and normalisation as that observed for z=0 disks. In contrast, the specific angular momentum (j; angular momentum divided by stellar mass), is ~0.2-0.3 dex lower on average compared to z=0 disks. The specific angular momentum scales as M^[0.6+/-0.2], consistent with that expected for dark matter (i.e., proportional to M^[2/3]). We find that z~0.9 star-forming galaxies have decreasing specific angular momentum with increasing Sersic index. Visually, the sources with the highest specific angular momentum, for a given mass, have the most disk-dominated morphologies. This implies that an angular momentum-mass-morphology relationship, similar to that observed in local massive galaxies, is already in place by z~1.
  • Local starbursts have a higher efficiency of converting gas into stars, as compared to typical star-forming galaxies at a given stellar mass, possibly indicative of different modes of star formation. With the peak epoch of galaxy formation occurring at z > 1, it remains to be established whether such an efficient mode of star formation is occurring at high-redshift. To address this issue, we measure the molecular gas content of seven high-redshift (z ~ 1.6) starburst galaxies with the Atacama Large (sub-)Millimeter Array and IRAM/Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our targets are selected from the sample of Herschel far-infrared detected galaxies having star formation rates (~300-800 Msolar/yr) elevated (>4x) above the star-forming `main sequence', and included in the FMOS-COSMOS near-infrared spectroscopic survey of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 1.6 with Subaru. We detect CO emission in all cases at high levels of significance, indicative of high gas fractions (~30-50%). Even more compelling, we firmly establish with a clean and systematic selection that starbursts, identified as main-sequence outliers, at high redshift generally have a lower ratio of CO to total infrared luminosity as compared to typical main-sequence star-forming galaxies, although with a smaller offset than expected based on past studies of local starbursts. We put forward a hypothesis that there exists a continuous increase in star formation efficiency with elevation from the main sequence with galaxy mergers as a possible physical driver. Along with a heightened star formation efficiency, our high-redshift sample is similar in other respects to local starbursts such as being metal rich and having a higher ionization state of the interstellar medium.
  • We report contributions to cosmic infrared background (CIB) intensities originating from known galaxies and their faint companions at submillimeter wavelengths. Using the publicly-available UltraVISTA catalog, and maps at 250, 350, and 500 {\mu}m from the \emph{Herschel} Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), we perform a novel measurement that exploits the fact that uncatalogued sources may bias stacked flux densities --- particularly if the resolution of the image is poor --- and intentionally smooth the images before stacking and summing intensities. By smoothing the maps we are capturing the contribution of faint (undetected in K_S ~ 23.4) sources that are physically associated, or correlated, with the detected sources. We find that the cumulative CIB increases with increased smoothing, reaching 9.82 +- 0.78, 5.77 +- 0.43, and 2.32 +- 0.19$\, \rm nW m^{-2} sr^{-1}$ at 250, 350, and 500 {\mu}m at 300 arcsec FWHM. This corresponds to a fraction of the fiducial CIB of 0.94 +- 0.23, 1.07 +- 0.31, and 0.97 +- 0.26 at 250, 350, and 500 {\mu}m, where the uncertainties are dominated by those of the absolute CIB. We then propose, with a simple model combining parametric descriptions for stacked flux densities and stellar mass functions, that emission from galaxies with log(M/Msun) > 8.5 can account for the most of the measured total intensities, and argue against contributions from extended, diffuse emission. Finally, we discuss prospects for future survey instruments to improve the estimates of the absolute CIB levels, and observe any potentially remaining emission at z > 4.
  • We describe the search for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) near the sub-millimeter bright starburst galaxy HFLS3 at $z$$=$6.34 and a study on the environment of this massive galaxy during the end of reionization.We performed two independent selections of LBGs on images obtained with the \textit{Gran Telescopio Canarias} (GTC) and the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} (HST) by combining non-detections in bands blueward of the Lyman-break and color selection. A total of 10 objects fulfilling the LBG selection criteria at $z$$>$5.5 were selected over the 4.54 and 55.5 arcmin$^2$ covered by our HST and GTC images, respectively. The photometric redshift, UV luminosity, and the star-formation rate of these sources were estimated with models of their spectral energy distribution. These $z$$\sim$6 candidates have physical properties and number densities in agreement with previous results. The UV luminosity function at $z$$\sim$6 and a Voronoi tessellation analysis of this field shows no strong evidence for an overdensity of relatively bright objects (m$_{F105W}$$<$25.9) associated with \textit{HFLS3}. However, the over-density parameter deduced from this field and the surface density of objects can not excluded definitively the LBG over-density hypothesis. Moreover we identified three faint objects at less than three arcseconds from \textit{HFLS3} with color consistent with those expected for $z$$\sim$6 galaxies. Deeper data are needed to confirm their redshifts and to study their association with \textit{HFLS3} and the galaxy merger that may be responsible for the massive starburst.
  • We present the rest-frame optical spectral energy distribution and stellar masses of six Herschel- selected gravitationally lensed dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at 1 < z < 3. These galaxies were first identified with Herschel/SPIRE imaging data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). The targets were observed with Spitzer/IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5um. Due to the spatial resolution of the IRAC observations at the level of 2 arcseconds, the lensing features of a background DSFG in the near-infrared are blended with the flux from the foreground lensing galaxy in the IRAC imaging data. We make use of higher resolution Hubble/WFC3 or Keck/NIRC2 Adaptive Optics imaging data to fit light profiles of the foreground lensing galaxy (or galaxies) as a way to model the foreground components, in order to successfully disentangle the foreground lens and background source flux densities in the IRAC images. The flux density measurements at 3.6 and 4.5um, once combined with Hubble/WFC3 and Keck/NIRC2 data, provide important constraints on the rest-frame optical spectral energy distribution of the Herschel-selected lensed DSFGs. We model the combined UV- to millimeter-wavelength SEDs to establish the stellar mass, dust mass, star-formation rate, visual extinction, and other parameters for each of these Herschel-selected DSFGs. These systems have inferred stellar masses in the range 8 x 10^10 to 4 x 10^11 Msun and star-formation rates of around 100 Msun yr-1. This puts these lensed sub-millimeter systems well above the SFR-M* relation observed for normal star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The high values of SFR inferred for these systems are consistent with a major merger-driven scenario for star formation.
  • We propose a new method of pushing $Herschel$ to its faintest detection limits using universal trends in the redshift evolution of the far infrared over 24$\mu$m colours in the well-sampled GOODS-North field. An extension to other fields with less multi-wavelength information is presented. This method is applied here to raise the contribution of individually detected $Herschel$ sources to the cosmic infrared background (CIRB) by a factor 5 close to its peak at 250$\mu$m and more than 3 in the 350$\mu$m and 500$\mu$m bands. We produce realistic mock $Herschel$ images of the deep PACS and SPIRE images of the GOODS-North field from the GOODS-$Herschel$ Key Program and use them to quantify the confusion noise at the position of individual sources, i.e., estimate a "local confusion noise". Two methods are used to identify sources with reliable photometric accuracy extracted using 24$\mu$m prior positions. The clean index (CI), previously defined but validated here with simulations, which measures the presence of bright 24$\mu$m neighbours and the photometric accuracy index (PAI) directly extracted from the mock $Herschel$ images. After correction for completeness, thanks to our mock $Herschel$ images, individually detected sources make up as much as 54% and 60% of the CIRB in the PACS bands down to 1.1 mJy at 100$\mu$m and 2.2 mJy at 160$\mu$m and 55, 33, and 13% of the CIRB in the SPIRE bands down to 2.5, 5, and 9 mJy at 250$\mu$m, 350$\mu$m, and 500$\mu$m, respectively. The latter depths improve the detection limits of $Herschel$ by factors of 5 at 250$\mu$m, and 3 at 350$\mu$m and 500$\mu$m as compared to the standard confusion limit. Interestingly, the dominant contributors to the CIRB in all $Herschel$ bands appear to be distant siblings of the Milky Way ($z$$\sim$0.96 for $\lambda$$<$300$\mu$m) with a stellar mass of $M_{\star}$$\sim$9$\times$10$^{10}$M$_{\odot}$.
  • We investigate the CO excitation of normal star forming disk galaxies at z=1.5 using IRAM PdBI observations of the CO[2-1], CO[3-2] and CO[5-4] transitions for 4 galaxies, including VLA observations of CO[1-0] for 3 of them, with the aim of constraining the average state of H2 gas. Exploiting prior knowledge of the velocity range, spatial extent and size of the CO emission we measure reliable line fluxes with S/N>4-7 for individual transitions. While the average CO Spectral Line Energy Distribution (SLED) has a sub-thermal excitation similar to the Milky Way (MW) up to CO[3-2], we show that the average CO[5-4] emission is four times stronger than assuming MW excitation. This demonstrates the presence of an additional component of more excited, denser and possibly warmer molecular gas. The ratio of CO[5-4] to lower-J CO emission is lower than in local (U)LIRGs and high-redshift SMGs, correlating closely with the average intensity of the radiation field <U> and with the star formation surface density, but not with the SF efficiency (SFE). The CO[5-4] luminosity correlates linearly with LIR over 4 orders of magnitudes, with z=1.5 BzK galaxies following the same trend as local spirals and (U)LIRGs and high redshift star bursting SMGs. The CO[5-4] luminosity is thus empirically related to the dense gas, and might be a more convenient way to probe it than standard high--density tracers that are much fainter than CO. We see excitation variations among our sample galaxies, that can be linked to their evolutionary state and clumpiness in optical rest frame images. In one galaxy we see spatially resolved excitation variations, where the more highly excited part of the galaxy corresponds to the location of massive SF clumps. This supports to models that suggest that giant clumps are the main source of the high excitation CO emission in high redshift disk-like galaxies.
  • We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 um-bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extra-galactic Survey (HerMES) and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Survey (H-ATLAS). Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (~17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and pre- vious lensing models for sub-millimeter galaxies. For four new sources that also have high-resolution sub-mm maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 um magnification factor (u_880) is ~1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (u_NIR), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ~2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.
  • Star-forming galaxies (SFGs) display a continuous distribution of specific star formation rates (sSFR) which can be approximated by the superposition of two log-normal distributions. The 1st of these encompasses the main sequence (MS) of SFGs, the 2nd one a rarer population of starbursts (SB). We show that the sSFR-distribution of SBs can be regarded as the result of a physical process (plausibly merging) taking the mathematical form of a log-normal boosting kernel and enhancing star formation activity. We explore the utility of splitting the star-forming population into MS and SB galaxies - an approach we term "2-Star Formation Mode" (2-SFM) framework - for understanding their molecular gas properties. Variations of star formation efficiency (SFE) and gas fractions among SFGs take a simple, redshift-independent form, once these quantities are normalized to the value of an average MS galaxy. The change in SFE for galaxies undergoing a starburst event scales supra-linearly with the SFR-increase, as expected for mergers. This implies a continuous distribution of galaxies in the Schmidt-Kennicutt plane that separates more clearly into loci for SBs and normal galaxies than observed in SFR vs. M* space. SBs with the largest deviations (>10-fold) from the MS, like many local ULIRGs, are not average SBs, but even rarer events with progenitors having larger gas fractions than typical MS galaxies. We statistically infer that the gas fractions of typical SBs decrease by a factor of 2 to 3 with respect to their direct MS progenitors, as expected to occur in short-term SFR-boosts during which internal gas reservoirs are drained more quickly than gas is accreted from the cosmic web. We predict variations of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor in the SFR-M* plane and provide evidence that the higher sSFR of distant galaxies is a direct consequence of larger gas fraction in these systems.
  • We present the most complete study to date of the X-ray emission from star-formation in high redshift (median z=0.7; z<1.5), IR-luminous (L_IR=10^10-10^13 L_sun) galaxies detected by Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. For our purpose we take advantage of the deepest X-ray data to date, the Chandra deep fields (North and South). Sources which host AGN are removed from our analysis by means of multiple AGN indicators. We find an AGN fraction of 18+/-2 per cent amongst our sample and note that AGN entirely dominate at values of log[L_X/L_IR]>-3 in both hard and soft X-ray bands. From the sources which are star-formation dominated, only a small fraction are individually X-ray detected and for the bulk of the sample we calculate average X-ray luminosities through stacking. We find an average soft X-ray to infrared ratio of log[L_SX/L_IR]=-4.3 and an average hard X-ray to infrared ratio of log[L_HX/L_IR]=-3.8. We report that the X-ray/IR correlation is approximately linear through the entire range of L_IR and z probed and, although broadly consistent with the local (z<0.1) one, it does display some discrepancies. We suggest that these discrepancies are unlikely to be physical, i.e. due to an intrinsic change in the X-ray properties of star-forming galaxies with cosmic time, as there is no significant evidence for evolution of the L_X/L_IR ratio with redshift. Instead they are possibly due to selection effects and remaining AGN contamination. We also examine whether dust obscuration in the galaxy plays a role in attenuating X-rays from star-formation, by investigating changes in the L_X/L_IR ratio as a function of the average dust temperature. We conclude that X-rays do not suffer any measurable attenuation in the host galaxy.
  • We discuss the restframe UV emission from the starbursting galaxy HFLS3 at z=6.34, discovered in Herschel/SPIRE data due to its red color in the submm wavelengths from 250-500 um. The apparent inst. SFR of HFLS3 inferred from the total FIR luminosity measured with over 15 photometric data points between 100 to 1000 um is 2900 Msun/yr. Keck/NIRC2 Ks band adaptive optics imaging data showed two potential NIR counterparts near HFLS3. Previously, the northern galaxy was taken to be in the foreground at z=2.1 while the southern galaxy was assumed to HFLS3's NIR counterpart. New HST/WFC3 and ACS imaging data show both optically bright galaxies are in the foreground at z<6. A new lensing model based on HST data and mm-wave continuum emission yields a magnification of 2.2+/-0.3. The lack of multiple imaging constrains the lensing magnification to be lower than either 2.7 or 3.5 at the 95% confidence level for the two scenarios, which attribute one or two components to HFLS3 in the source plane. Correcting for gravitational lensing, the inst. SFR is 1320 Msun/yr with the 95% confidence lower limit around 830 Msun/yr. Using models for the restframe UV to FIR SED, the ave. SFR over the last 100 Myr is around 660 Msun/yr. The dust and stellar masses of HFLS3 from the same SED models are 3x10^8 Msun and ~5x10^10 Msun, respectively, with large systematic uncertainties on assumptions related to the SED model. With HST/WFC3 images we also find diffuse NIR emission about 0.5" (~3 kpc) SW of HFLS3 that remains undetected in the ACS data. The emission has a photometric redshift consistent with either z~6 or a dusty galaxy template at z~2. If at the same redshift as HFLS3 the detected diffuse emission could be part of the complex merger system that could be triggering the starburst. Alternatively, it could be part of the foreground structure at z~2.1 that is responsible for lensing of HFLS3.
  • We present a study of the infrared properties for a sample of seven spectroscopically confirmed submillimeter galaxies at $z>$4.0. By combining ground-based near-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, Herschel SPIRE, and ground-based submillimeter/millimeter photometry, we construct their Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) and a composite model to fit the SEDs. The model includes a stellar emission component at $\lambda_{\rm rest} <$ 3.5$ \mu$m; a hot dust component peaking at $\lambda_{rest} \sim$ 5$\,\mu$m; and cold dust component which becomes significant for $\lambda_{\rm rest} >$ 50$\,\mu$m. Six objects in the sample are detected at 250 and 350$ \mu$m. The dust temperatures for the sources in this sample are in the range of 40$-$80 K, and their $L_{\rm FIR}$ $\sim$ 10$^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$ qualifies them as Hyper$-$Luminous Infrared Galaxies (HyperLIRGs). The mean FIR-radio index for this sample is around $< q > = 2.2$ indicating no radio excess in their radio emission. Most sources in the sample have 24$ \mu$m detections corresponding to a rest-frame 4.5$ \mu$m luminosity of Log$_{10}$(L$_{4.5}$ / L$_{\odot}$) = 11 $\sim$ 11.5. Their L$_{\rm 4.5}$/$L_{\rm FIR}$ ratios are very similar to those of starburst dominated submillimeter galaxies at $z \sim$ 2. The $L_{\rm CO}-L_{\rm FIR}$ relation for this sample is consistent with that determined for local ULIRGs and SMGs at $z \sim$ 2. We conclude that submillimeter galaxies at $z >$ 4 are hotter and more luminous in the FIR, but otherwise very similar to those at $z \sim$ 2. None of these sources show any sign of the strong QSO phase being triggered.
  • We analyse the rest-frame UV-to-NIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), star-forming (SF) BzK (sBzK), and UV-selected galaxies at 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the COSMOS, GOODS-N, and GOODS-S fields. Additionally, we complement the multi-wavelength coverage of the galaxies located in the GOODS fields with deep FIR data taken from the GOODS-Herschel project. We find that sBzK galaxies represent the general population of SF galaxies at z ~ 2 better than LBGs. For a given stellar mass, LBGs tend to have bluer optical colours than sBzK and UV-selected galaxies. We find clean PACS individual detections for a subsample of 48 LBGs, 89 sBzK, and 91 UV-selected galaxies, that measure their dust emission directly. Their SFR_total = SFR_UV + SFR_IR cannot be recovered with the dust-correction factors derived with their continuum slope and the IRX-beta relations for local starbursts. This has implications, for example, in the definition of the main sequence (MS) at z ~ 2. PACS-detected galaxies are located above the z ~ 2 MS and thus their star formation is probably driven by starburst. This is in agreement with the shape of their IR SEDs. PACS-detected galaxies with redder UV continuum slope and higher stellar mass are more attenuated. We find that for a given UV continuum slope the dustiest galaxies at higher redshifts are more attenuated and that for a given stellar mass the dustiest galaxies at higher redshifts have stronger FIR emission. This suggests an evolution of their dust properties. However, we do not find significant evolution in the relation between dust attenuation and stellar mass with redshift, at least at z < 2.5. There is a subpopulation of 17, 26, and 27 LBGs, sBzK, and UV-selected galaxies, respectively, that are detected in any of the SPIRE bands. We speculate that SPIRE-detected LBGs are the bridging population between sub-mm galaxies and LBGs.
  • The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) is the largest Guaranteed Time Key Programme on the Herschel Space Observatory. With a wedding cake survey strategy, it consists of nested fields with varying depth and area totalling ~380 deg^2. In this paper, we present deep point source catalogues extracted from Herschel-SPIRE observations of all HerMES fields, except for the later addition of the 270 deg^2 HeLMS field. These catalogues constitute the second Data Release (DR2) made in October 2013. A subset of these catalogues, which consists of bright sources extracted from Herschel-SPIRE observations completed by May 1, 2010 (covering ~ 74 deg^2) were released earlier in the first extensive Data Release (DR1) in March 2012. Two different methods are used to generate the point source catalogues, the SUSSEXtractor (SXT) point source extractor used in two earlier data releases (EDR and EDR2) and a new source detection and photometry method. The latter combines an iterative source detection algorithm, StarFinder (SF), and a De-blended SPIRE Photometry (DESPHOT) algorithm. We use end-to-end Herschel-SPIRE simulations with realistic number counts and clustering properties to characterise basic properties of the point source catalogues, such as the completeness, reliability, photometric and positional accuracy. Over 500, 000 catalogue entries in HerMES fields (except HeLMS) are released to the public through the HeDAM website (http://hedam.oamp.fr/herMES).
  • We use deep Herschel PACS and SPIRE observations in GOODSS, GOODSN and COSMOS to estimate the average dust mass (Mdust) of galaxies on a redshift-stellar mass (Mstar)-SFR grid. We study the scaling relations between Mdust, Mstar and SFR at z<=2.5. No clear evolution of Mdust is observed at fixed SFR and Mstar. We find a tight correlation between SFR and Mdust, likely a consequence of the Schmidt-Kennicutt (S-K) law. The Mstar-Mdust correlation observed by previous works flattens or sometimes disappears when fixing the SFR. Most of it likely derives from the combination of the Mdust-SFR and Mstar-SFR correlations. We then investigate the gas content as inferred by converting Mdust by assuming that the dust/gas ratio scales linearly with the gas metallicity. All galaxies in the sample follow, within uncertainties, the same SFR-Mgas relation (integrated S-K law), which broadly agrees with CO-based results for the bulk of the population, despite the completely different approaches. The majority of galaxies at z~2 form stars with an efficiency (SFE=SFR/Mgas) ~5 times higher than at z~0. It is not clear what fraction of such variation is an intrinsic redshift evolution and what fraction arises from selection effects. The gas fraction (fgas) decreases with Mstar and increases with SFR, and does not evolve with z at fixed Mstar and SFR. We explain these trends by introducing a universal relation between fgas, Mstar and SFR, non-evolving out to z~2.5. Galaxies move across this relation as their gas content evolves in time. We use the 3D fundamental fgas-Mstar-SFR relation and the redshift evolution of the Main Sequence to estimate the evolution of fgas in the average population of galaxies as a function of z and Mstar, and we find evidence a downsizing scenario.
  • [Abridged] We study the evolution of the dust temperatures of galaxies in the SFR-M* plane up to z~2 using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory. Starting from a sample of galaxies with reliable star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses (M*) and redshift estimates, we grid the SFR-M* parameter space in several redshift ranges and estimate the mean Tdust of each SFR-M*-z bin. Dust temperatures are inferred using the stacked far-infrared flux densities of our SFR-M*-z bins. At all redshifts, Tdust increases with infrared luminosities (LIR), specific SFRs (SSFR; i.e., SFR/M*) and distances with respect to the main sequence (MS) of the SFR-M* plane (i.e., D_SSFR_MS=log[SSFR(galaxy)/SSFR_MS(M*,z)]). The Tdust-SSFR and Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlations are statistically more significant than the Tdust-LIR one. While the slopes of these three correlations are redshift-independent, their normalizations evolve from z=0 and z~2. We convert these results into a recipe to derive Tdust from SFR, M* and z. The existence of a strong Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlation provides us with information on the dust and gas content of galaxies. (i) The slope of the Tdust-D__SSFR_MS correlation can be explained by the increase of the star-formation efficiency (SFE; SFR/Mgas) with D_SSFR_MS as found locally by molecular gas studies. (ii) At fixed D_SSFR_MS, the constant Tdust observed in galaxies probing large ranges in SFR and M* can be explained by an increase or decrease of the number of star-forming regions with comparable SFE enclosed in them. (iii) At high redshift, the normalization towards hotter temperature of the Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlation can be explained by the decrease of the metallicities of galaxies or by the increase of the SFE of MS galaxies. All these results support the hypothesis that the conditions prevailing in the star-forming regions of MS and far-above-MS galaxies are different.
  • We study the link between observed ultraviolet luminosity, stellar mass, and dust attenuation within rest-frame UV-selected samples at z~ 4, 3, and 1.5. We measure by stacking at 250, 350, and 500 um in the Herschel/SPIRE images from the HerMES program the average infrared luminosity as a function of stellar mass and UV luminosity. We find that dust attenuation is mostly correlated with stellar mass. There is also a secondary dependence with UV luminosity: at a given UV luminosity, dust attenuation increases with stellar mass, while at a given stellar mass it decreases with UV luminosity. We provide new empirical recipes to correct for dust attenuation given the observed UV luminosity and the stellar mass. Our results also enable us to put new constraints on the average relation between star formation rate and stellar mass at z~ 4, 3, and 1.5. The star formation rate-stellar mass relations are well described by power laws (SFR~ M^0.7), with the amplitudes being similar at z~4 and z~3, and decreasing by a factor of 4 at z~1.5 at a given stellar mass. We further investigate the evolution with redshift of the specific star formation rate. Our results are in the upper range of previous measurements, in particular at z~3, and are consistent with a plateau at 3<z<4. Current model predictions (either analytic, semi-analytic or hydrodynamic) are inconsistent with these values, as they yield lower predictions than the observations in the redshift range we explore. We use these results to discuss the star formation histories of galaxies in the framework of the Main Sequence of star-forming galaxies. Our results suggest that galaxies at high redshift (2.5<z<4) stay around 1 Gyr on the Main Sequence. With decreasing redshift, this time increases such that z=1 Main Sequence galaxies with 10^8<M_*/Msun<10^10 stay on the Main Sequence until z=0.
  • Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) are a UV-faint, IR-bright galaxy population that reside at z~2 and are believed to be in a phase of dusty star-forming and AGN activity. We present far-IR observations of a complete sample of DOGs in the 2 deg2 of COSMOS. The 3077 DOGs have <z>=1.9+/-0.3 and are selected from 24um and r+ observations using a color cut of r+ - [24]>=7.5 (AB mag) and S24>=100uJy. Based on the near-IR SEDs, 47% are star-formation dominated and 10% are AGN-dominated. We use SPIRE far-IR photometry from HerMES to calculate the IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature for the 1572 (51%) DOGs that are detected at 250um (>=3{\sigma}). For the remaining 1505 (49%) that are undetected, we perform a median stacking analysis to probe fainter luminosities. Detected and undetected DOGs have average IR luminosities of (2.8+/-0.4) x 1012 LSun and (0.77+-0.08)x10^12LSun, and dust temperatures of 34+/-7 K and 37+/-3 K, respectively. The IR luminosity function of DOGs with S24>=100uJy is calculated, using far-IR observations and stacking. DOGs contribute 10-30% to the total star formation rate density of the Universe at z=1.5-2.5, dominated by 250um detected and bump DOGs. For comparison, DOGs contribute 30% to the star-formation rate density of the Universe for all galaxies at z=1.5-2.5 with S24>=100uJy. DOGs have a large scatter about the star-formation main sequence and their specific star-formation rates show that the observed phase of star-formation could be responsible for their observed stellar mass at z~2.
  • We report the PACS-100um/160um detections of a sample of 42 GALEX-selected and FIR-detected Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 1 located in the COSMOS field and analyze their ultra-violet (UV) to far-infrared (FIR) properties. The detection of these LBGs in the FIR indicates that they have a dust content high enough so that its emission can be directly detected. According to a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting with stellar population templates to their UV-to-near-IR observed photometry, PACS-detected LBGs tend to be bigger, more massive, dustier, redder in the UV continuum, and UV-brighter than PACS-undetected LBGs. PACS-detected LBGs at z ~ 1 are mostly disk-like galaxies and are located over the green-valley and red sequence of the color-magnitude diagram of galaxies at their redshift. By using their UV and IR emission, we find that PACS-detected LBGs tend to be less dusty and have slightly higher total star-formation rates (SFRs) than other PACS-detected UV-selected galaxies within their same redshift range. As a consequence of the selection effect due to the depth of the FIR observations employed, all our PACS-detected LBGs are LIRGs. However, none of them are in the ULIRG regime, where the FIR observations are complete. The finding of ULIRGs-LBGs at higher redshifts suggests an evolution of the FIR emission of LBGs with cosmic time. In an IRX-$\beta$ diagram, PACS-detected LBGs at z ~ 1 tend to be located around the relation for local starburst similarly to other UV-selected PACS-detected galaxies at their same redshift. Consequently, the dust-correction factors obtained with their UV continuum slope allow to determine their total SFR, unlike at higher redshifts. However, the dust attenuation derived from UV to NIR SED fitting overestimates the total SFR for most of our PACS-detected LBGs in age-dependent way: the overestimation factor is higher in younger galaxies.
  • We describe the far-infrared (FIR; rest-frame 8--1000\mu m) properties of a sample of 443 H\alpha-selected star-forming galaxies in the COSMOS and UDS fields detected by the HiZELS imaging survey. Sources are identified using narrow-band filters in combination with broad-band photometry to uniformly select H\alpha\ (and [OII] if available) emitters in a narrow redshift slice at z = 1.47+/-0.02. We use a stacking approach in Spitzer, Herschel (from PEP and HerMES surveys) and AzTEC images to describe their typical FIR properties. We find that HiZELS galaxies with observed H\alpha\ luminosities of ~ 10^{8.1-9.1} Lo have bolometric FIR luminosities of typical LIRGs, L_FIR ~ 10^{11.48+/-0.05} Lo. Combining the H\alpha\ and FIR luminosities, we derive median SFR = 32+/-5 Mo/yr and H\alpha\ extinctions of A(H\alpha) = 1.0+/-0.2 mag. Perhaps surprisingly, little difference is seen in typical HiZELS extinction levels compared to local star-forming galaxies. We confirm previous empirical stellar mass (M*) to A(H\alpha) relations and the little or no evolution up to z = 1.47. For HiZELS galaxies, we provide an empirical parametrisation of the SFR as a function of (u-z)_rest colours and 3.6\mu m photometry. We find that the observed H\alpha\ luminosity is a dominant SFR tracer when (u-z)_rest ~< 0.9 mag or when 3.6\mu m photometry > 22 mag (Vega) or when M* < 10^9.7 Mo. We do not find any correlation between the [OII]/H\alpha\ and FIR luminosity, suggesting that this emission line ratio does not trace the extinction of the most obscured star-forming regions. The luminosity-limited HiZELS sample tends to lie above of the so-called `main sequence' for star-forming galaxies, especially at low M*. This work suggests that obscured star formation is linked to the assembly of M*, with deeper potential wells in massive galaxies providing dense, heavily obscured environments in which stars can form rapidly.
  • Stellar archeology shows that massive elliptical galaxies today formed rapidly about ten billion years ago with star formation rates above several hundreds solar masses per year (M_sun/yr). Their progenitors are likely the sub-millimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) at redshifts (z) greater than 2. While SMGs' mean molecular gas mass of 5x10^10 M_sun can explain the formation of typical elliptical galaxies, it is inadequate to form ellipticals that already have stellar masses above 2x10^11 M_sun at z ~ 2. Here we report multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a rare merger of two massive SMGs at z = 2.3. The system is currently forming stars at a tremendous rate of 2,000 M_sun/yr. With a star formation efficiency an order-of-magnitude greater than that of normal galaxies, it will quench the star formation by exhausting the gas reservoir in only ~200 million years. At a projected separation of 19 kiloparsecs, the two massive starbursts are about to merge and form a passive elliptical galaxy with a stellar mass of ~4x10^11 M_sun. Our observations show that gas-rich major galaxy mergers, concurrent with intense star formation, can form the most massive elliptical galaxies by z ~ 1.5.
  • We present results from the deepest Herschel-PACS (Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer) far-infrared blank field extragalactic survey, obtained by combining observations of the GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey) fields from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and GOODS-Herschel key programmes. We describe data reduction and the construction of images and catalogues. In the deepest parts of the GOODS-S field, the catalogues reach 3-sigma depths of 0.9, 0.6 and 1.3 mJy at 70, 100 and 160 um, respectively, and resolve ~75% of the cosmic infrared background at 100um and 160um into individually detected sources. We use these data to estimate the PACS confusion noise, to derive the PACS number counts down to unprecedented depths and to determine the infrared luminosity function of galaxies down to LIR=10^11 Lsun at z~1 and LIR=10^12 Lsun at z~2, respectively. For the infrared luminosity function of galaxies, our deep Herschel far-infrared observations are fundamental because they provide more accurate infrared luminosity estimates than those previously obtained from mid-infrared observations. Maps and source catalogues (>3-sigma) are now publicly released. Combined with the large wealth of multi-wavelength data available for the GOODS fields, these data provide a powerful new tool for studying galaxy evolution over a broad range of redshifts.