• It has recently been established that the properties of young star clusters (YSCs) can vary as a function of the galactic environment in which they are found. We use the cluster catalogue produced by the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) collaboration to investigate cluster properties in the spiral galaxy M51. We analyse the cluster population as a function of galactocentric distance and in arm and inter-arm regions. The cluster mass function exhibits a similar shape at all radial bins, described by a power law with a slope close to $-2$ and an exponential truncation around $10^5\ \rm{M}_{\odot}$ . While the mass functions of the YSCs in the spiral arm and inter-arm regions have similar truncation masses, the inter-arm region mass function has a significantly steeper slope than the one in the arm region; a trend that is also observed in the giant molecular cloud mass function and predicted by simulations. The age distribution of clusters is dependent on the region considered, and is consistent with rapid disruption only in dense regions, while little disruption is observed at large galactocentric distances and in the inter-arm region. The fraction of stars forming in clusters does not show radial variations, despite the drop in the $H_2$ surface density measured as function of galactocentric distance. We suggest that the higher disruption rate observed in the inner part of the galaxy is likely at the origin of the observed flat cluster formation efficiency radial profile.
  • The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is a multiwavelength Cycle 21 Treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope. It studied 50 nearby star-forming galaxies in five bands from the near UV to the I-band, combining new Wide Field Camera 3 observations with archival Advanced Camera for Surveys data. LEGUS was designed to investigate how star formation occurs and develops on both small and large scales, and how it relates to the galactic environments. In this paper we present the photometric catalogs for all the apparently single stars identified in the 50 LEGUS galaxies. Photometric catalogs and mosaicked images for all filters are available for download. We present optical and near UV color-magnitude diagrams for all the galaxies. For each galaxy we derived the distance from the tip of the red giant branch. We then used the NUV color-magnitude diagrams to identify stars more massive than 14 Mo, and compared their number with the number of massive stars expected from the GALEX FUV luminosity. Our analysis shows that the fraction of massive stars forming in star clusters and stellar associations is about constant with the star formation rate. This lack of a relation suggests that the time scale for evaporation of unbound structures is comparable or longer than 10 Myr. At low star formation rates this translates to an excess of mass in clustered environments as compared to model predictions of cluster evolution, suggesting that a significant fraction of stars form in unbound systems.
  • We report on the discovery of ionised gas filaments in the circum-galactic halo of the extremely metal-poor compact starburst SBS 0335-052E in a 1.5h integration with the MUSE integral-field spectrograph. We detect these features in H${\alpha}$ and [OIII] emission down to surface-brightness levels of $5 \times 10^{-19}$erg s$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$arcsec$^{-2}$. The filaments have projected diameters of 2.1 kpc and extend more than 9 kpc to the north and north-west from the main stellar body. We also detect extended nebular HeII $\lambda$4686 emission that brightens towards the north-west at the rim of a star-burst driven super-shell, suggestive of a locally enhanced UV radiation field due to shocks. We also present a velocity field of the ionised gas. The filaments appear to connect seamlessly in velocity space to the kinematical disturbances caused by the shell. Similar to high-$z$ star-forming galaxies, the ionised gas in this galaxy is dispersion dominated. We argue that the filaments were created via feedback from the starburst and that these ionised structures in the halo may act as escape channels for Lyman continuum radiation in this gas-rich system.
  • Recently acquired WFC3 UV (F275W and F336W) imaging mosaics under the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) combined with archival ACS data of M51 are used to study the young star cluster (YSC) population of this interacting system. Our newly extracted source catalogue contains 2834 cluster candidates, morphologically classified to be compact and uniform in colour, for which ages, masses and extinction are derived. In this first work we study the main properties of the YSC population of the whole galaxy, considering a mass-limited sample. Both luminosity and mass functions follow a power law shape with slope -2, but at high luminosities and masses a dearth of sources is observed. The analysis of the mass function suggests that it is best fitted by a Schechter function with slope -2 and a truncation mass at $1.00\pm0.12\times10^5\ M_\odot$. Through Monte Carlo simulations we confirm this result and link the shape of the luminosity function to the presence of a truncation in the mass function. A mass limited age function analysis, between 10 and 200 Myr, suggests that the cluster population is undergoing only moderate disruption. We observe little variation in the shape of the mass function at masses above $1\times10^4\ M_\odot$, over this age range. The fraction of star formation happening in the form of bound clusters in M51 is $\sim20\%$ in the age range 10 to 100 Myr and little variation is observed over the whole range from 1 to 200 Myr.
  • We report the large effort which is producing comprehensive high-level young star cluster (YSC) catalogues for a significant fraction of galaxies observed with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) Hubble treasury program. We present the methodology developed to extract cluster positions, verify their genuine nature, produce multiband photometry (from NUV to NIR), and derive their physical properties via spectral energy distribution fitting analyses. We use the nearby spiral galaxy NGC628 as a test case for demonstrating the impact that LEGUS will have on our understanding of the formation and evolution of YSCs and compact stellar associations within their host galaxy. Our analysis of the cluster luminosity function from the UV to the NIR finds a steepening at the bright end and at all wavelengths suggesting a dearth of luminous clusters. The cluster mass function of NGC628 is consistent with a power-law distribution of slopes $\sim -2$ and a truncation of a few times $10^5$ M$_\odot$. After their formation YSCs and compact associations follow different evolutionary paths. YSCs survive for a longer timeframe, confirming their being potentially bound systems. Associations disappear on time scales comparable to hierarchically organized star-forming regions, suggesting that they are expanding systems. We find mass-independent cluster disruption in the inner region of NGC628, while in the outer part of the galaxy there is little or no disruption. We observe faster disruption rates for low mass ($\leq$ $10^4$ M$_\odot$) clusters suggesting that a mass-dependent component is necessary to fully describe the YSC disruption process in NGC628.
  • Galaxies at high redshifts provide a valuable tool to study cosmic dawn, and therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of both the Lyman-alpha emission and the Lyman break from a z = 7.512+/- 0.004 galaxy, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with G102 grism on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6 sigma) in multiple observational position angles (PA), with total integrated Ly{\alpha} line flux of 1.06+/- 0.12 e10-17erg s-1cm-2. The line flux is nearly a factor of four higher than the previous MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations of faint Ly{\alpha} emission at {\lambda} = 1.0347{\mu}m, yielding z = 7.5078+/- 0.0004. This is consistent with other recent observations implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy underestimates total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on ground-based Lyman-{\alpha} measurements. A 4-{\sigma} detection of the NV line in one PA also suggests a weak Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), potentially making this source the highest-redshift AGN yet found. Thus, this observation from the Hubble Space Telescope clearly demonstrates the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy to study the epoch of reionization.
  • We test the predictions of spectral synthesis models based on seven different massive-star prescriptions against Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) observations of eight young massive clusters in two local galaxies, NGC 1566 and NGC 5253, chosen because predictions of all seven models are available at the published galactic metallicities. The high angular resolution, extensive cluster inventory and full near-ultraviolet to near-infrared photometric coverage make the LEGUS dataset excellent for this study. We account for both stellar and nebular emission in the models and try two different prescriptions for attenuation by dust. From Bayesian fits of model libraries to the observations, we find remarkably low dispersion in the median E(B-V) (~0.03 mag), stellar masses (~10^4 M_\odot) and ages (~1 Myr) derived for individual clusters using different models, although maximum discrepancies in these quantities can reach 0.09 mag and factors of 2.8 and 2.5, respectively. This is for ranges in median properties of 0.05-0.54 mag, 1.8-10x10^4 M_\odot and 1.6-40 Myr spanned by the clusters in our sample. In terms of best fit, the observations are slightly better reproduced by models with interacting binaries and least well reproduced by models with single rotating stars. Our study provides a first quantitative estimate of the accuracies and uncertainties of the most recent spectral synthesis models of young stellar populations, demonstrates the good progress of models in fitting high-quality observations, and highlights the needs for a larger cluster sample and more extensive tests of the model parameter space.
  • The leakage of Lyman continuum photons from star forming galaxies is an elusive parameter. When observed, it provides a wealth of information on star formation in galaxies and the geometry of the interstellar medium, and puts constraints on the role of star forming galaxies in the reionization of the universe. H-alpha-selected galaxies at z~2 trace the highest star formation population at the peak of cosmic star formation history, providing a base for directly measuring Lyman continuum escape. Here we present this method, and highlight its benefits as well as caveats. We also use the method on 10 H-alpha emitters in the Chandra Deep Field South at z=2.2, also imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope in the ultraviolet. We find no individual Lyman continuum detections, and our stack puts a 5 sigma upper limit on the average absolute escape fraction of <24%, consistent with similar studies. With future planned observations, the sample sizes would rapidly increase and the method presented here would provide very robust constraints on the escape fraction.
  • We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of six nearby Type~Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, three of which were also observed in the near-IR (NIR) with Wide-Field Camera~3. UV observations with the Swift satellite, as well as ground-based optical and near-infrared data provide complementary information. The combined data-set covers the wavelength range $0.2$--$2~\mu$m. By also including archival data of SN 2014J, we analyse a sample spanning observed colour excesses up to $E(B-V)=1.4~$mag. We study the wavelength dependent extinction of each individual SN and find a diversity of reddening laws when characterised by the total-to-selective extinction $R_V$. In particular, we note that for the two SNe with $E(B-V)\gtrsim1~$mag, for which the colour excess is dominated by dust extinction, we find $R_V=1.4\pm0.1$ and $R_V=2.8\pm0.1$. Adding UV photometry reduces the uncertainty of fitted $R_V$ by $\sim50\,$% allowing us to also measure $R_V$ of individual low-extinction objects which point to a similar diversity, currently not accounted for in the analyses when SNe~Ia are used for studying the expansion history of the universe.
  • Context. Lyman alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) are used to probe the distant universe and are therefore important for galaxy evolution studies and for providing clues to the nature of the epoch of reionization, but the exact circumstances under which Lyman alpha escapes a galaxy are still not fully understood. Aims. The Trident project is designed to simultaneously examine Lyman alpha, H-alpha and Lyman Continuum emission from galaxies at redshift z~2, thus linking together these three aspects of ionising radiation in galaxies. In this paper, we outline the strategy of this project and examine the properties of LAEs in the GOODS North field. Methods. We performed a narrowband LAE survey in GOODS North using existing and two custom made filters at the Nordic Optical Telescope with MOSCA. We use complementary broad band archival data in the field to make a careful candidate selection and perform optical to near-IR SED fitting. We also estimate far-infrared luminosities by matching our candidates to detections in Spitzer/MIPS 24{\mu}m and Herschel/PACS catalogs. Results. We find a total of 25 LAE candidates, probing mainly the bright end of the LAE luminosity function with L_Ly {\alpha} ~ 1-15e42 erg/s. They display a range of masses of ~0.5-50e9 M_solar, and average ages from a few tens of Myr to 1 Gyr when assuming a constant star formation history. The majority of our candidates also show signs of recent elevated star formation. Three candidates have counterparts in the GOODS-Herschel far-IR catalogue, with luminosities consistent with ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). Conclusions. The wide range of parameters derived from our SED fitting, as well as part of our sample being detected as ULIRGs, seems to indicate that at these Lyman alpha luminosities, LAEs do not necessarily have to be young dwarfs, and that a lack of dust is not required for Lyman alpha to escape.
  • The Ly$\alpha$ line is an important diagnostic for star formation at high redshift, but interpreting its flux and line profile is difficult because of the resonance nature of Ly$\alpha$. Trends between the escape of Ly$\alpha$ photons and dust and properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) have been found, but detailed comparisons between Ly$\alpha$ emission and the properties of the gas in local high-redshift analogs are vital for understanding the relation between Ly$\alpha$ emission and galaxy properties. For the first time, we can directly infer the properties of the ionized gas at the same location and similar spatial scales of the extended Ly$\alpha$ halo around ESO 338-IG04. We obtained VLT/MUSE integral field spectra. We used ionization parameter mapping of the [SII]/[OIII] line ratio and the kinematics of H$\alpha$ to study the ionization state and kinematics of the ISM of ESO338-IG04. The velocity map reveals two outflows. The entire central area of the galaxy is highly ionized by photons leaking from the HII regions around the youngest star clusters. Three highly ionized cones have been identified, of which one is associated with an outflow. We propose a scenario where the outflows are created by mechanical feedback of the older clusters, while the highly ionized gas is caused by the hard ionizing photons emitted by the youngest clusters. A comparison with the Ly$\alpha$ map shows that the (approximately bipolar) asymmetries observed in the Ly$\alpha$ emission are consistent with the base of the outflows detected in H$\alpha$. No clear correlation with the ionization cones is found. The mechanical and ionization feedback of star clusters significantly changes the state of the ISM by creating ionized cones and outflows. The comparison with Ly$\alpha$ suggests that especially the outflows could facilitate the escape of Ly$\alpha$ photons [Abridged].
  • We measured the sizes and morphological parameters of LARS galaxies in the continuum, Lya, and Ha images. We studied morphology by using the Gini coefficient vs M20 and asymmetry vs concentration diagrams. We then simulated LARS galaxies at z~2 and 5.7, performing the same morphological measurements. We also investigated the detectability of LARS galaxies in current deep field observations. The subsample of LAEs within LARS (LARS-LAEs) was stacked to provide a comparison to stacking studies performed at high redshift. LARS galaxies have continuum size, stellar mass, and rest-frame absolute magnitude typical of Lyman break analogues in the local Universe and also similar to 2<z<3 star-forming galaxies and massive LAEs. LARS optical morphology is consistent with the one of merging systems, and irregular or starburst galaxies. For the first time we quantify the morphology in Lya images: even if a variety of intrinsic conditions of the interstellar medium can favour the escape of Lya photons, LARS-LAEs appear small in the continuum, and their Lya is compact. LARS galaxies tend to be more extended in Lya than in the rest-frame UV. It means that Lya photons escape by forming haloes around HII regions of LARS galaxies. The stack of LARS-LAE Lya images is peaked in the centre, indicating that the conditions, which make a galaxy an LAE, tend to produce a concentrated surface brightness profile. On the other hand, the stack of all LARS galaxies is shallower and more extended. This can be caused by the variety of dust and HI amount and distribution, which produces a more complex, patchy, and extended profile, like the one observed for Lyman break galaxies that can contribute to the stack. We cannot identify a single morphological property that controls whether a galaxy emits a net positive Lya flux. However, the LARS-LAEs have continuum properties consistent with merging systems.
  • Over the past 18 months we have revisited the science requirements for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These efforts span the full range of E-ELT science and include input from a broad cross-section of astronomers across the ESO partner countries. In this contribution we summarise the key cases relating to studies of high-redshift galaxies, galaxy evolution, and stellar populations, with a more expansive presentation of a new case relating to detection of exoplanets in stellar clusters. A general requirement is the need for two observational modes to best exploit the large (>40 sq. arcmin) patrol field of the E-ELT. The first mode ('high multiplex') requires integrated-light (or coarsely resolved) optical/near-IR spectroscopy of >100 objects simultaneously. The second ('high definition'), enabled by wide-field adaptive optics, requires spatially-resolved, near-IR of >10 objects/sub-fields. Within the context of the conceptual study for an ELT-MOS called MOSAIC, we summarise the top-level requirements from each case and introduce the next steps in the design process.
  • Though Lyman alpha emission (Lya) is one of the most used tracers of massive star formation at high redshift, a correct understanding of radiation transfer effects by neutral gas is required to properly quantify the star formation rate along the history of the Universe. We are embarked in a program to study the properties of the Lya emission (spectral profile, spatial distribution, relation to Balmer lines intensity,...) in several local starburst galaxies. We present here the results obtained for IRAS 08339+6517. Using evolutionary population synthesis models, we have characterized the properties of the starburst (UV continuum, Halpha, total infrared and X-ray emissions, etc.), which transformed 1.4e+8 Mo of gas into stars around 5-6 Myr ago. In addition to the central compact emission blob, we have identified a diffuse Lya emission component smoothly distributed over the whole central area of IRAS 08339+6517. This diffuse emission is spatially decoupled from the UV continuum, the Halpha emission or the Halpha/Hbeta ratio. Both locally and globally, the Lya/Halpha ratio is lower than the Case B predictions, even after reddening correction, with an overall Lya escape fraction of only 4%. We conclude that in IRAS 08339+6517 the resonant scattering of Lya photons by an outflowing shell of neutral gas causes their highly-efficient destruction by dust, which explains the low Lya escape fraction measured. These results stress again the importance of a proper correction of scattering and transfer effects when using Lya to derive the star formation rate in high-redshift galaxies.
  • Context. The Lyman alpha emission line of galaxies is an important tool for finding galaxies at high redshift, and thus probe the structure of the early universe. However, the resonance nature of the line and its sensitivity to dust and neutral gas is still not fully understood. Aims. We present measurements of the velocity, covering fraction and optical depth of neutral gas in front of two well known local blue compact galaxies that show Lyman alpha in emission: ESO 338-IG 04 and Haro 11. We thus test observationally the hypothesis that Lyman alpha can escape through neutral gas by being Doppler shifted out of resonance. Methods. We present integral field spectroscopy from the GIRAFFE/Argus spectrograph at VLT/FLAMES in Paranal, Chile. The excellent wavelength resolution allows us to accurately measure the velocity of the ionized and neutral gas through the H-alpha emission and Na D absorption, which traces the ionized medium and cold interstellar gas, respectively. We also present independent measurements with the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph which confirm our results. Results. For ESO 338-IG04, we measure no significant shift of neutral gas. The best fit velocity is -15 (16) km/s. For Haro 11, we see an outflow from knot B at 44 (13) km/s and infalling gas towards knot C with 32 (12) km/s. Based on the relative strength of the Na D absorption lines, we estimate low covering fractions of neutral gas (down to 10%) in all three cases. Conclusions. The Na D absorption likely occurs in dense clumps with higher column densities than where the bulk of the Ly-alpha scattering takes place. Still, we find no strong correlation between outflowing neutral gas and a high Lyman alpha escape fraction. The Lyman alpha photons from these two galaxies are therefore likely escaping due to a low column density and/or covering fraction.
  • Small galaxies consisting entirely of population III (pop III) stars may form at high redshifts, and could constitute one of the best probes of such stars. Here, we explore the prospects of detecting gravitationally lensed pop III galaxies behind the galaxy cluster J0717.5+3745 (J0717) with both the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). By projecting simulated catalogs of pop III galaxies at z~7-15 through the J0717 magnification maps, we estimate the lensed number counts as a function of flux detection threshold. We find that the ongoing HST survey CLASH, targeting a total of 25 galaxy clusters including J0717, potentially could detect a small number of pop III galaxies if ~1% of the baryons in these systems have been converted into pop III stars. Using JWST exposures of J0717, this limit can be pushed to ~0.1% of the baryons. Ultra-deep JWST observations of unlensed fields are predicted to do somewhat worse, but will be able to probe pop III galaxies with luminosities intermediate between those detectable in HST/CLASH and in JWST observations of J0717. We also explain how current measurements of the galaxy luminosity function at z=7-10 can be used to constrain pop III galaxy models with very high star formation efficiencies (~10% of the baryons converted into pop III stars).
  • We estimate the fraction of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) that remain undetected by optical SN searches due to obscuration by large amounts of dust in their host galaxies. This effect is especially important in luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, which are locally rare but dominate the star formation at redshifts of z~1-2. We perform a detailed investigation of the SN activity in the nearby luminous infrared galaxy Arp 299 and estimate that up to 83% of the SNe in Arp 299 and in similar galaxies in the local Universe are missed by observations at optical wavelengths. For rest-frame optical surveys we find the fraction of SNe missed due to high dust extinction to increase from the average local value of ~19% to ~38% at z~1.2 and then stay roughly constant up to z~2. It is therefore crucial to take into account the effects of obscuration by dust when determining SN rates at high redshift and when predicting the number of CCSNe detectable by future high-z surveys such as LSST, JWST, and Euclid. For a sample of nearby CCSNe (distances 6-15 Mpc) detected during the last 12 yr, we find a lower limit for the local CCSN rate of 1.5 +0.4/-0.3 x 10^-4 yr^-1 Mpc^-3, consistent with that expected from the star formation rate. Even closer, at distances less than ~6 Mpc, we find a significant increase in the CCSN rate, indicating a local overdensity of star formation caused by a small number of galaxies that have each hosted multiple SNe.
  • In order to use Lyman alpha (Lya) emission as star formation tracer in cosmological studies, we must understand how the resonant scattering affects the escape fraction of the Lya photons. Thus, high spatial resolution multiwavelength studies of nearby Lya emitters, like Haro 2, are highly needed. For that purpose, we have used Chandra X-ray and HST (UV, optical and NIR) images of Haro 2, and STIS and ground-based spectral images along its major and minor axes, to characterize the Lya emission and the properties of the stellar population. The UV, Ha (Halpha) and FIR luminosities of the Haro 2 nuclear starburst are reproduced using evolutionary synthesis models assuming a young stellar population with ages ~3.5-5.0 Myr, affected by differential interstellar extinctions. The observed X-ray emission is attributed to gas heated by the mechanical energy released by the starburst (soft component) and a Ultra-Luminous X-ray source candidate (hard). Both compact and diffuse Lya components are observed. Whereas Lya is spatially decoupled from Balmer lines emission, Balmer decrement and UV continuum, the diffuse Lya component is spatially correlated with the diffuse soft X-ray emission. Moreover, unlike the compact one, diffuse Lya shows luminosities larger than predicted from Ha, assuming case B recombination and dust extinction as derived from Ha/Hbeta. We propose that, whereas the compact Lya emission is associated to the massive stellar clusters and is affected by outflows and dust extinction, the diffuse Lya originates in gas ionized by the hot plasma responsible for the soft X-ray radiation, as suggested by their spatial correlation and by the measured L(Ha)/LsoftX ratios. Calibration of Lya as star formation rate tracer should therefore include both effects (destruction vs. enhancement) to avoid biases in the study of galaxies at cosmological distances.
  • We present supernova rate measurements at redshift 0.1-1.0 from the Stockholm VIMOS Supernova Survey (SVISS). The sample contains 16 supernovae in total. The discovered supernovae have been classified as core collapse or type Ia supernovae (9 and 7, respectively) based on their light curves, colour evolution and host galaxy photometric redshift. The rates we find for the core collapse supernovae are 3.29 (-1.78,-1.45)(+3.08,+1.98) x 10^-4 yr^-1 Mpc^-3 h70^3 (with statistical and systematic errors respectively) at average redshift 0.39 and 6.40 (-3.12,-2.11)(+5.30,+3.65) x 10^-4 yr^-1 Mpc^-3 h70^3 at average redshift 0.73. For the type Ia supernovae we find a rate of 1.29 (-0.57,-0.28)(+0.88,+0.27) x 10^-4 yr^-1 Mpc^-3 h70^3 at average redshift 0.62. All of these rate estimates have been corrected for host galaxy extinction, using a method that includes supernovae missed in infrared bright galaxies at high redshift. We use Monte Carlo simulations to make a thorough study of the systematic effects from assumptions made when calculating the rates and find that the most important errors come from misclassification, the assumed mix of faint and bright supernova types and uncertainties in the extinction correction. We compare our rates to other observations and to the predicted rates for core collapse and type Ia supernovae based on the star formation history and different models of the delay time distribution. Overall, our measurements, when taking the effects of extinction into account, agree quite well with the predictions and earlier results. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the role of systematic effects, and dust extinction in particular, when trying to estimate the rates of supernovae at moderate to high redshift.
  • The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionize our understanding of the high-redshift Universe, and may be able to test the prediction that the first, chemically pristine (population III) stars formed with very high characteristic masses. Since isolated population III stars are likely to be beyond the reach of JWST, small population III galaxies may offer the best prospects of directly probing the properties of metal-free stars. Here, we present Yggdrasil, a new spectral synthesis code geared towards the first galaxies. Using this model, we explore the JWST imaging detection limits for population III galaxies and investigate to what extent such objects may be identified based on their JWST colours. We predict that JWST should be able to detect population III galaxies with stellar population masses as low as ~10^5 Msolar at z=10 in ultra deep exposures. Over limited redshift intervals, it may also be possible to use colour criteria to select population III galaxy candidates for follow-up spectroscopy. The colours of young population III galaxies dominated by direct star light can be used to probe the stellar initial mass function (IMF), but this requires almost complete leakage of ionizing photons into the intergalactic medium. The colours of objects dominated by nebular emission show no corresponding IMF sensitivity. We also note that a clean selection of population III galaxies at z~7-8 can be achieved by adding two JWST/MIRI filters to the JWST/NIRCam filter sets usually discussed in the context of JWST ultra deep fields.
  • We present the late-time optical light curve of the ejecta of SN 1987A measured from HST imaging observations spanning the past 17 years. We find that the flux from the ejecta declined up to around year 2001, powered by the radioactive decay of 44Ti. Then the flux started to increase, more than doubling by the end of 2009. We show that the increase is the result of energy deposited by X-rays produced in the interaction with the circumstellar medium. We suggest that the change of the dominant energy input to the ejecta, from internal to external, marks the transition from supernova to supernova remnant. The details of the observations and the modelling are described in the accompanying supplementary information.
  • Supernova surveys can be used to study a variety of subjects such as: (i) cosmology through type Ia supernovae (SNe), (ii) star-formation rates through core-collapse SNe, and (iii) supernova properties and their connection to host galaxy characteristics. The Stockholm VIMOS Supernova Survey (SVISS) is a multi-band imaging survey aiming to detect supernovae at redshift ~0.5 and derive thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova rates at high redshift. In this paper we present the supernovae discovered in the survey along with light curves and a photometric classification into thermonuclear and core-collapse types. To detect the supernovae in the VLT/VIMOS multi-epoch images, we used difference imaging and a combination of automatic and manual source detection to minimise the number of spurious detections. Photometry for the found variable sources was obtained and careful simulations were made to estimate correct errors. The light curves were typed using a Bayesian probability method and Monte Carlo simulations were used to study misclassification. We detected 16 supernovae, nine of which had a core-collapse origin and seven had a thermonuclear origin. The estimated misclassification errors are quite small, in the order of 5%, but vary with both redshift and type. The mean redshift of the supernovae is 0.58. Additionally, we found a variable source with a very extended light curve that could possibly be a pair instability supernova.
  • We present a HST multiband analysis of the large population of star clusters in the blue compact galaxy (BCG) Mrk 930. We have reconstructed the spectral energy distributions of the star clusters and estimated age, mass, and extinction for a representative sample. We observe a very young cluster population with 70% of the systems formed less than 10 Myr ago. The peak in the star cluster age distribution at 4 Myr is corroborated by the presence of Wolf-Rayet spectral features, and by the observed optical and IR lines ratios [OIII]/H_beta and [NeIII]/[NeII]. The recovered extinction in these very young clusters shows large variations, with a decrease at older ages. It is likely that our analysis is limited to the optically brightest objects (i.e. systems only partially embedded in their natal cocoons). We map the extinction across the galaxy using low-resolution spectra and the H_alpha/H_beta ratio, as obtained from ground-based narrow band imaging. We find that the mean optical extinction derived in the starburst regions is close to the averaged value observed in the clusters, but locally, do not trace the more extinguished clusters. Previous HST studies of BCGs have revealed a population of young and extremely red super star clusters. We detect a considerable fraction of clusters affected by a red excess also in Mrk 930. The nature of the red excess, which turns up at near-IR wavelengths remains unknown. We compare the cluster and the star formation history, the latter derived from the fit of spectral population synthesis models to the spectra. We find a general agreement between the two independently estimated quantities. Using the cluster properties we perform a study of the host environmental properties. We find that the cluster formation efficiency is significantly higher, suggesting a key role of the environment for the formation of these massive objects.[Abridged]
  • We have initiated a survey using the newly commissioned X-shooter spectrograph to target candidate relatively metal-rich damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs). The spectral coverage of X-shooter allows us to search for not only Lyman-alpha emission, but also rest-frame optical emission lines. We have chosen DLAs where the strongest rest-frame optical lines ([OII], [OIII], Hbeta and Halpha) fall in the NIR atmospheric transmission bands. In this first paper resulting from the survey, we report on the discovery of the galaxy counterpart of the z_abs = 2.354 DLA towards the z=2.926 quasar Q2222$-0946. This DLA is amongst the most metal-rich z>2 DLAs studied so far at comparable redshifts and there is evidence for substantial depletion of refractory elements onto dust grains. We measure metallicities from ZnII, SiII, NiII, MnII and FeII of -0.46+/-0.07, -0.51+/-0.06, -0.85+/-0.06, -1.23+/-0.06, and -0.99+/-0.06, respectively. The galaxy is detected in the Lyman-alpha, [OIII] lambda4959,5007 Halpha emission lines at an impact parameter of about 0.8 arcsec (6 kpc at z_abs = 2.354). We infer a star-formation rate of 10 M_sun yr^-1, which is a lower limit due to the possibility of slit-loss. Compared to the recently determined Halpha luminosity function for z=2.2 galaxies the DLA-galaxy counterpart has a luminosity of L~0.1L^*_Halpha. The emission-line ratios are 4.0 (Lyalpha/Halpha) and 1.2 ([OIII]/Halpha). The Lyalpha line shows clear evidence for resonant scattering effects, namely an asymmetric, redshifted (relative to the systemic redshift) component and a much weaker blueshifted component. The fact that the blueshifted component is relatively weak indicates the presence of a galactic wind. The properties of the galaxy counterpart of this DLA is consistent with the prediction that metal-rich DLAs are associated with the most luminous of the DLA-galaxy counterparts.
  • We have used multi-band imaging to investigate the nature of the extreme starburst environment in Haro 11 galaxy. The central starburst region has been observed in 8 HST wavebands and at 2.16 micron at the ESO-VLT. We constructed integrated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for about 200 star clusters and compared them with single stellar population models in order to derive ages, masses and extinctions of thestar clusters. The present starburst has lasted for 40 Myr, and shows a peak of cluster formation only 3.5 Myr old. With such an extremely young cluster population, Haro 11 represents a unique opportunity to investigate the youngest phase of the cluster formation process and evolution in starburst systems. Extinction tends to diminish as function of the cluster age, but the spread is large and for clusters in partial embedded phases (< 5 Myr). A fraction of low-mass (> 10^4 Msun), very young (1-3 Myr) clusters is missing, either because they are embedded inthe parental molecular cloud and heavily extinguished, or because of blending. Almost half of the cluster sample is affected by flux excesses at wavelengths 8000 \AA which cannot be explained by simple stellar evolutionary models. Fitting SED models over all wavebands leads to systematic overestimates of cluster ages and incorrect masses for the stellar population supplying the light in these clusters. We show that the red excess affects also the HST F814W filter, which is typically used to constrain cluster physical properties. The clusters which show the red excess are younger than 40 Myr; we propose possible physical explanations for the phenomenon. Finally, we estimate that Haro 11 hasproduced bound clusters at a rate almost a factor of 10 higher than the massive and regular spirals, like the Milky Way. (Abriged)