• We present a local dust mass function (DMF) of 15,293 galaxies drawn from the overlapping GAMA and H-ATLAS fields out to redshifts of 0.1. We derive this fundamental measurement of the dust content of galaxies using the traditional density corrected $V$max method where we use: (i) the normal photometric selection limit ($pV$max) and (ii) a bivariate brightness distribution (BBD) technique, which accounts for two selection effects. A single Schechter function adequately represents both the $pV$max and BBD estimates. We derive Schechter function parameters of $\alpha$=(-1.21+/-0.01), M$^*$=(4.70+/-0.17)$\times10^{7}h^{2}_{70}M_{\odot}$, $\phi^*$=(6.18+/-0.26)$\times10^{-3}h^{3}_{70}\rm Mpc^{-3}dex^{-1}$. The dust mass density parameter integrated down to our limit of $10^{4}M_{\odot}$ is $\Omega_{d}$=(1.09+/-0.02)$\times10^{-6}$ with an overall fraction of baryons (by mass) stored in dust $f_{mb}$=(4.59+/-0.08)$\times10^{-5}$; the additional error due to cosmic variance is ~7-17 per cent. We show that the observed DMF does not agree with theoretical predictions derived from semi-analytic models or hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. We show that the former attributes too much dust to high stellar mass galaxies. The dust-to-stellar mass ratio is higher for low-mass disks than currently assumed in the models. The latter underpredicts the high mass end of the DMF potentially due to long grain growth timescales. In comparing the DMFs and galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMF) we find there may be a simple approximate linear scaling of (7.61+/-0.36)$\times10^{-4}$ from the late-type galaxy (LTG) GSMF to the LTG DMF. The LTG DMF can also be approximated by scaling the disk GSMF by a factor of (9.63+/-0.46)$\times10^{-4}$. We derive dust mass densities of ${\Omega}_{d}$=(0.83+/-0.03)$\times10^{-6}$ and ${\Omega}_{d}$=(0.060+/-0.004)$\times10^{-6}$ for LTGs and early-types respectively.
  • We present an analysis of a deep (1$\sigma$=13 $\mu$Jy) cosmological 1.2-mm continuum map based on ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. In the 1 arcmin$^2$ covered by ASPECS we detect nine sources at $>3.5\sigma$ significance at 1.2-mm. Our ALMA--selected sample has a median redshift of $z=1.6\pm0.4$, with only one galaxy detected at z$>$2 within the survey area. This value is significantly lower than that found in millimeter samples selected at a higher flux density cut-off and similar frequencies. Most galaxies have specific star formation rates similar to that of main sequence galaxies at the same epoch, and we find median values of stellar mass and star formation rates of $4.0\times10^{10}\ M_\odot$ and $\sim40~M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Using the dust emission as a tracer for the ISM mass, we derive depletion times that are typically longer than 300 Myr, and we find molecular gas fractions ranging from $\sim$0.1 to 1.0. As noted by previous studies, these values are lower than using CO--based ISM estimates by a factor $\sim$2. The 1\,mm number counts (corrected for fidelity and completeness) are in agreement with previous studies that were typically restricted to brighter sources. With our individual detections only, we recover $55\pm4\%$ of the extragalactic background light (EBL) at 1.2 mm measured by the Planck satellite, and we recover $80\pm7\%$ of this EBL if we include the bright end of the number counts and additional detections from stacking. The stacked contribution is dominated by galaxies at $z\sim1-2$, with stellar masses of (1-3)$\times$10$^{10}$ M$_\odot$. For the first time, we are able to characterize the population of galaxies that dominate the EBL at 1.2 mm.
  • We present a search for [CII] line and dust continuum emission from optical dropout galaxies at $z>6$ using ASPECS, our ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF). Our observations, which cover the frequency range $212-272$ GHz, encompass approximately the range $6<z<8$ for [CII] line emission and reach a limiting luminosity of L$_{\rm [CII]}\sim$(1.6-2.5)$\times$10$^{8}$ L$_{\odot}$. We identify fourteen [CII] line emitting candidates in this redshift range with significances $>$4.5 $\sigma$, two of which correspond to blind detections with no optical counterparts. At this significance level, our statistical analysis shows that about 60\% of our candidates are expected to be spurious. For one of our blindly selected [CII] line candidates, we tentatively detect the CO(6-5) line in our parallel 3-mm line scan. None of the line candidates are individually detected in the 1.2 mm continuum. A stack of all [CII] candidates results in a tentative detection with $S_{1.2mm}=14\pm5\mu$Jy. This implies a dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) of $(3\pm1)$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We find that the two highest--SFR objects have candidate [CII] lines with luminosities that are consistent with the low-redshift $L_{\rm [CII]}$ vs. SFR relation. The other candidates have significantly higher [CII] luminosities than expected from their UV--based SFR. At the current sensitivity it is unclear whether the majority of these sources are intrinsically bright [CII] emitters, or spurious sources. If only one of our line candidates was real (a scenario greatly favored by our statistical analysis), we find a source density for [CII] emitters at $6<z<8$ that is significantly higher than predicted by current models and some extrapolations from galaxies in the local universe.
  • We present direct estimates of the mean sky brightness temperature in observing bands around 99GHz and 242GHz due to line emission from distant galaxies. These values are calculated from the summed line emission observed in a blind, deep survey for specrtal line emission from high redshift galaxies using ALMA (the 'ASPECS' survey). In the 99 GHz band, the mean brightness will be dominated by rotational transitions of CO from intermediate and high redshift galaxies. In the 242GHz band, the emission could be a combination of higher order CO lines, and possibly [CII] 158$\mu$m line emission from very high redshift galaxies ($z \sim 6$ to 7). The mean line surface brightness is a quantity that is relevant to measurements of spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, and as a potential tool for studying large-scale structures in the early Universe using intensity mapping. While the cosmic volume and the number of detections are admittedly small, this pilot survey provides a direct measure of the mean line surface brightness, independent of conversion factors, excitation, or other galaxy formation model assumptions. The mean surface brightness in the 99GHZ band is: $T_B = 0.94\pm 0.09$ $\mu$K. In the 242GHz band, the mean brightness is: $T_B = 0.55\pm 0.033$ $\mu$K. These should be interpreted as lower limits on the average sky signal, since we only include lines detected individually in the blind survey, while in a low resolution intensity mapping experiment, there will also be the summed contribution from lower luminosity galaxies that cannot be detected individually in the current blind survey.
  • We derive the total cold gas, atomic hydrogen, and molecular gas masses of approximately 24 000 galaxies covering four decades in stellar mass at redshifts 0.5 < z < 3.0, taken from the CANDELS survey. Our inferences are based on the inversion of a molecular hydrogen based star formation law, coupled with a prescription to separate atomic and molecular gas. We find that: 1) there is an increasing trend between the inferred cold gas (HI and H2), HI, and H2 mass and the stellar mass of galaxies down to stellar masses of 10^8 Msun already in place at z = 3; 2) the molecular fractions of cold gas increase with increasing stellar mass and look-back time; 3) there is hardly any evolution in the mean HI content of galaxies at fixed stellar mass; 4) the cold gas fraction and relative amount of molecular hydrogen in galaxies decrease at a relatively constant rate with time, independent of stellar mass; 5) there is a large population of low-stellar mass galaxies dominated by atomic gas. These galaxies are very gas rich, but only a minor fraction of their gas is molecular; 6) the ratio between star-formation rate (SFR) and inferred total cold gas mass (HI + H2) of galaxies (i.e., star-formation efficiency; SFE) increases with star-formation at fixed stellar masses. Due to its simplicity, the presented approach is valuable to assess the impact of selection biases on small samples of directly-observed gas masses and to extend scaling relations down to stellar mass ranges and redshifts that are currently difficult to probe with direct measurements of gas content.
  • We present a semi-empirical model to infer the atomic and molecular hydrogen content of galaxies as a function of halo mass and time. Our model combines the SFR-halo mass-redshift relation (constrained by galaxy abundances) with inverted SFR-surface density relations to infer galaxy H I and H2 masses. We present gas scaling relations, gas fractions, and mass functions from z = 0 to z = 3 and the gas properties of galaxies as a function of their host halo masses. Predictions of our work include: 1) there is a ~ 0.2 dex decrease in the H I mass of galaxies as a function of their stellar mass since z = 1.5, whereas the H2 mass of galaxies decreases by > 1 dex over the same period. 2) galaxy cold gas fractions and H2 fractions decrease with increasing stellar mass and time. Galaxies with M* > 10^10 Msun are dominated by their stellar content at z < 1, whereas less-massive galaxies only reach these gas fractions at z = 0. We find the strongest evolution in relative gas content at z < 1.5. 3) the SFR to gas mass ratio decreases by an order of magnitude from z = 3 to z = 0. This is consistent with lower H2 fractions; these lower fractions in combination with smaller gas reservoirs correspond to decreased present-day galaxy SFRs. 4) an H2-based star- formation relation can simultaneously fuel the evolution of the cosmic star-formation and reproduce the observed weak evolution in the cosmic HI density. 5) galaxies residing in haloes with masses near 10^12 Msun are most efficient at obtaining large gas reservoirs and forming H2 at all redshifts. These two effects lie at the origin of the high star-formation efficiencies in haloes with the same mass.
  • We combine a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, tracking atomic and molecular phases of cold gas, with a three-dimensional radiative-transfer and line tracing code to study the sub-mm emission from atomic and molecular species (CO, HCN, [CI], [CII], [OI]) in galaxies. We compare the physics that drives the formation of stars at the epoch of peak star formation (SF) in the Universe (z = 2.0) with that in local galaxies. We find that normal star-forming galaxies at high redshift have much higher CO-excitation peaks than their local counterparts and that CO cooling takes place at higher excitation levels. CO line ratios increase with redshift as a function of galaxy star-formation rate, but are well correlated with H2 surface density independent of redshift. We find an increase in the [OI]/[CII] line ratio in typical star-forming galaxies at z = 1.2 and z = 2.0 with respect to counterparts at z = 0. Our model results suggest that typical star-forming galaxies at high redshift consist of much denser and warmer star-forming clouds than their local counterparts. Galaxies belonging to the tail of the SF activity peak at z = 1.2 are already less dense and cooler than counterparts during the actual peak of SF activity (z = 2.0). We use our results to discuss how future ALMA surveys can best confront our predictions and constrain models of galaxy formation.
  • One key piece of information missing from high redshift galaxy surveys is the galaxies' cold gas contents. We present a new method to indirectly determine cold gas surface densities and integrated gas masses from galaxy star formation rates and to separate the atomic and molecular gas components. Our predicted molecular and total gas surface densities and integrated masses are in very good agreement with direct measurements quoted in the literature for low and high-z galaxies. We apply this method to predict the gas content for a sample of $\sim 57000$ galaxies in the COSMOS field at $0.5 \leq z \leq 2.0$, selected to have $I_{AB} < 24$ mag. This approach allows us to investigate in detail the redshift evolution of galaxy cold and molecular gas content versus stellar mass and to provide fitting formulae for galaxy gas fractions. We find a clear trend between galaxy gas fraction, molecular gas fraction and stellar mass with redshift, suggesting that massive galaxies consume and/or expel their gas at higher redshift than less massive objects and have lower fractions of their gas in molecular form. The characteristic stellar mass separating gas- from stellar-dominated galaxies decreases with time. This indicates that massive galaxies reach a gas-poor state earlier than less massive objects. These trends can be considered to be another manifestation of downsizing in star formation activity.