• We study the generation of planar quantum squeezed (PQS) states by quantum non-demolition (QND) measurement of a cold ensemble of $^{87}$Rb atoms. Precise calibration of the QND measurement allows us to infer the conditional covariance matrix describing the $F_y$ and $F_z$ components of the PQS, revealing the dual squeezing characteristic of PQS. PQS states have been proposed for single-shot phase estimation without prior knowledge of the likely values of the phase. We show that for an arbitrary phase, the generated PQS gives a metrological advantage of at least 3.1 dB relative to classical states. The PQS also beats traditional squeezed states generated with the same QND resources, except for a narrow range of phase values. Using spin squeezing inequalities, we show that spin-spin entanglement is responsible for the metrological advantage.
  • We present a review on the progress in the understanding and characterization of holonomy and topology of a discrete-time quantum walk architecture, consisting of a unitary step given by a sequence of two non-commuting rotations in parameter space \cite{Puentesarxiv}. Unlike other similar systems recently studied in detail in the literature, this system does not present continous 1D topological boundaries, it only presents a discrete number of Dirac points where the quasi- energy gap closes. At these discrete points the topological winding number is not defined. Therefore, such discrete points represent topological boundaries of dimension zero, and they endow the system with a non-trivial topology. We illustrate the non-trivial character of the system by calculating the Zak phase. We also propose a suitable experimental scheme to implement these ideas, and we present preliminary experimental data.
  • The linear birefringence of uniaxial crystal plates is known since the 17th century, and it is widely used in numerous optical setups and devices. Here we demonstrate, both theoretically and experimentally, a fine lateral circular birefringence of such crystal plates. This effect is a novel example of the spin-Hall effect of light, i.e., a transverse spin-dependent shift of the paraxial light beam transmitted through the plate. The well-known linear birefringence and the new circular birefringence form an interesting analogy with the Goos-H\"anchen and Imbert-Fedorov beam shifts that appear in the light reflection at a dielectric interface. We report the experimental observation of the effect in a remarkably simple system of a tilted half-wave plate and polarizers using polarimetric and quantum-weak-measurement techniques for the beam-shift measurements. In view of great recent interest in spin-orbit interaction phenomena, our results could find applications in modern polarization optics and nano-photonics.
  • We report on a simple scheme that may present a non-trivial geometric Zak phase ($\Phi_{Zak}$) structure, which is based on a discrete-time quantum walk architecture. By detecting the Zak phase difference between two trajectories connecting adjacent Dirac points where the quasi-energy gap closes for opposite values of quasi-momentum ($k$), it is possible to identify geometric invariants. These geometric invariants correspond to $|\Phi_{Zak}^{+(-)}-\Phi_{Zak}^{-(+)}|=\pi$ and $|\Phi_{Zak}^{+(-)}-\Phi_{Zak}^{+(-)}|=0$, we argue that this effect can be directly measured.
  • Weak measurements are a unique tool for accessing information about weakly interacting quantum systems with minimal back action. Joint weak measurements of single-particle operators with pointer states characterized by a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution can provide, in turn, key information about quantum correlations which can be of relevance for quantum information applications. Here we demonstrate that by employing two-dimensional pointer states endowed with orbital angular momentum (OAM), it is possible to extract weak values of the higher order moments of single-particle operators, an inaccessible quantity with Gaussian pointer states only. We provide a specific example that illustrates the advantages of our method both, in terms of signal enhancement, and information retrieval.
  • Given an experimental set-up and a fixed number of measurements, how should one take data in order to optimally reconstruct the state of a quantum system? The problem of optimal experiment design (OED) for quantum state tomography was first broached by Kosut et al. [arXiv:quant-ph/0411093v1]. Here we provide efficient numerical algorithms for finding the optimal design, and analytic results for the case of 'minimal tomography'. We also introduce the average OED, which is independent of the state to be reconstructed, and the optimal design for tomography (ODT), which minimizes tomographic bias. We find that these two designs are generally similar. Monte-Carlo simulations confirm the utility of our results for qubits. Finally, we adapt our approach to deal with constrained techniques such as maximum likelihood estimation. We find that these are less amenable to optimization than cruder reconstruction methods, such as linear inversion.
  • The certificate of success for a number of important quantum information processing protocols, such as entanglement distillation, is based on the difference in the entanglement content of the quantum states before and after the protocol. In such cases, effective bounds need to be placed on the entanglement of non-local states consistent with statistics obtained from local measurements. In this work, we study numerically the ability of a novel type of homodyne detector which combines phase sensitivity and photon-number resolution to set accurate bounds on the entanglement content of two-mode quadrature squeezed states without the need for full state tomography. We show that it is possible to set tight lower bounds on the entanglement of a family of two-mode degaussified states using only a few measurements. This presents a significant improvement over the resource requirements for the experimental demonstration of continuous-variable entanglement distillation, which traditionally relies on full quantum state tomography.
  • A nonclassical light source is used to demonstrate experimentally the absolute efficiency calibration of a photon-number-resolving detector. The photon-pair detector calibration method developed by Klyshko for single-photon detectors is generalized to take advantage of the higher dynamic range and additional information provided by photon-number-resolving detectors. This enables the use of brighter twin-beam sources including amplified pulse pumped sources, which increases the relevant signal and provides measurement redundancy, making the calibration more robust.
  • We present a general theoretical method to generate maximally entangled mixed states of a pair of photons initially prepared in the singlet polarization state. This method requires only local operations upon a single photon of the pair and exploits spatial degrees of freedom to induce decoherence. We report also experimental confirmation of these theoretical results.
  • We report experimental results on mixed-state generation by multiple scattering of polarization-entangled photon pairs created from parametric down-conversion. By using a large variety of scattering optical systems we have experimentally obtained entangled mixed states that lie upon and below the Werner curve in the linear entropy-tangle plane. We have also introduced a simple phenomenological model built on the analogy between classical polarization optics and quantum maps. Theoretical predictions from such model are in full agreement with our experimental findings.
  • We present a theoretical analysis of the connection between classical polarization optics and quantum mechanics of two-level systems. First, we review the matrix formalism of classical polarization optics from a quantum information perspective. In this manner the passage from the Stokes-Jones-Mueller description of classical optical processes to the representation of one- and two-qubit quantum operations, becomes straightforward. Second, as a practical application of our classical-\emph{vs}-quantum formalism, we show how two-qubit maximally entangled mixed states (MEMS), can be generated by using polarization and spatial modes of photons generated via spontaneous parametric down conversion.
  • We show that it is possible to achieve maximally entangled mixed states of two qubits from the singlet state via the action of local non-trace-preserving quantum channels. Moreover, we present a simple, feasible linear optical implementation of one of such channels.
  • We show that the method of maximum-likelihood estimation, recently introduced in the context of quantum process tomography, can be applied to the determination of Mueller matrices characterizing the polarization properties of classical optical systems. Contrary to linear reconstruction algorithms, the proposed method yields physically acceptable Mueller matrices even in presence of uncontrolled experimental errors. We illustrate the method on the case of an unphysical measured Mueller matrix taken from the literature.
  • We investigate the ray dynamics in an optical cavity when a ray splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. Using Hamiltonian optics, we show that such a simple device presents a surprisingly rich chaotic ray dynamics.
  • We present a numerical investigation of the ray dynamics in a paraxial optical cavity when a ray splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. We show that depending on the position of the beam splitter the optical resonator can become unstable and the ray dynamics displays a positive Lyapunov exponent.