• Silicon carbide dust is ubiquitous in circumstellar envelopes around C-rich AGB stars. However, the main gas-phase precursors leading to the formation of SiC dust have not yet been identified. The most obvious candidates among the molecules containing an Si--C bond detected in C-rich AGB stars are SiC2, SiC, and Si2C. We aim to study how widespread and abundant SiC2, SiC, and Si2C are in envelopes around C-rich AGB stars and whether or not these species play an active role as gas-phase precursors of silicon carbide dust in the ejecta of carbon stars. We carried out sensitive observations with the IRAM 30m telescope of a sample of 25 C-rich AGB stars to search for emission lines of SiC2, SiC, and Si2C in the 2 mm band. We performed non-LTE excitation and radiative transfer calculations based on the LVG method to model the observed lines of SiC2 and to derive SiC2 fractional abundances in the observed envelopes. We detect SiC2 in most of the sources, SiC in about half of them, and do not detect Si2C in any source, at the exception of IRC +10216. Most of these detections are reported for the first time in this work. We find a positive correlation between the SiC and SiC2 line emission, which suggests that both species are chemically linked, the SiC radical probably being the photodissociation product of SiC2 in the external layer of the envelope. We find a clear trend in which the denser the envelope, the less abundant SiC2 is. The observed trend is interpreted as an evidence of efficient incorporation of SiC2 onto dust grains, a process which is favored at high densities owing to the higher rate at which collisions between particles take place. The observed behavior of a decline in the SiC2 abundance with increasing density strongly suggests that SiC2 is an important gas-phase precursor of SiC dust in envelopes around carbon stars.
  • The CO(J=3-2) emission from the CSE of the binary S-type AGB star W Aql has been observed at subarcsecond resolution using ALMA. The aim of this paper is to investigate the wind properties of the AGB star and to analyse how the known companion has shaped the CSE. The average mass-loss rate during the creation of the detected CSE is estimated through modelling, using the ALMA brightness distribution and previously published single-dish measurements as observational constraints. The ALMA observations are presented and compared to the results from a 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) binary interaction model with the same properties as the W Aql system and with two different orbital eccentricities. Three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling is performed and the response of the interferometer is modelled and discussed. The estimated average mass-loss rate of W~Aql agrees with previous results. The size of the emitting region is consistent with photodissociation models. The CO(J=3-2) emission is dominated by a smooth component overlayed with two weak arc patterns with different separations. The larger pattern is predicted by the binary interaction model with separations of 10" and therefore likely due to the known companion. It is consistent with a binary orbit with low eccentricity. The smaller separation pattern is asymmetric and coincides with the dust distribution, but the separation timescale (200 yrs) is not consistent with any known process of the system. The separation of the known companions of the system is large enough to not have a very strong effect on the circumstellar morphology. The density contrast across the envelope of a binary with an even larger separation will not be easily detectable, even with ALMA, unless the orbit is strongly asymmetric or the AGB star has a much larger mass-loss rate.
  • Linear carbon chains are common in various types of astronomical molecular sources. Possible formation mechanisms involve both bottom-up and top-down routes. We have carried out a combined observational and modeling study of the formation of carbon chains in the C-star envelope IRC+10216, where the polymerization of acetylene and hydrogen cyanide induced by ultraviolet photons can drive the formation of linear carbon chains of increasing length. We have used ALMA to map the emission of 3 mm rotational lines of the hydrocarbon radicals C2H, C4H, and C6H, and the CN-containing species CN, C3N, HC3N, and HC5N with an angular resolution of 1". The spatial distribution of all these species is a hollow, 5-10" wide, spherical shell located at a radius of 10-20" from the star, with no appreciable emission close to the star. Our observations resolve the broad shell of carbon chains into thinner sub-shells which are 1-2" wide and not fully concentric, indicating that the mass loss process has been discontinuous and not fully isotropic. The radial distributions of the species mapped reveal subtle differences: while the hydrocarbon radicals have very similar radial distributions, the CN-containing species show more diverse distributions, with HC3N appearing earlier in the expansion and the radical CN extending later than the rest of the species. The observed morphology can be rationalized by a chemical model in which the growth of polyynes is mainly produced by rapid gas-phase chemical reactions of C2H and C4H radicals with unsaturated hydrocarbons, while cyanopolyynes are mainly formed from polyynes in gas-phase reactions with CN and C3N radicals.
  • We have mapped 12CO J=3-2 and other molecular lines from the "water-fountain" bipolar pre-planetary nebula (PPN) IRAS 16342-3814 with ~0."35 resolution using ALMA. We find (i) two very high-speed knotty, jet-like molecular outflows, (ii) a central high-density (> few x 10^6 cm^{-3}), expanding torus of diameter 1300 AU, and (iii) the circumstellar envelope of the progenitor AGB, generated by a sudden, very large increase in the mass-loss rate to >3.5 x 10^{-4} Msun/yr in the past ~455 yr. Strong continuum emission at 0.89 mm from a central source (690 mJy), if due to thermally-emitting dust, implies a substantial mass (0.017 Msun) of very large (~mm-sized) grains. The measured expansion ages of the above structural components imply that the torus (age~160 yr) and the younger high-velocity outflow (age~110 yr) were formed soon after the sharp increase in the AGB mass-loss rate. Assuming a binary model for the jets in IRAS 16342, the high momentum rate for the dominant jet-outflow in IRAS 16342 implies a high minimum accretion rate, ruling out standard Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton wind accretion and wind Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) models with white-dwarf or main-sequence companions. Most likely, enhanced RLOF from the primary or accretion modes operating within common envelope evolution are needed.
  • Yellow hypergiants are rare and represent a fast evolutionary stage of massive evolved stars. That evolutionary phase is characterised by a very intense mass loss, the understanding of which is still very limited. Here we report ALMA Compact Array observations of a 50$"$-mosaic toward the Fried Egg nebula, around one of the few Galactic yellow hypergiants IRAS 17163-3907. The emission from the $^{12}$CO J=2-1 line, H30$\alpha$ recombination line, and continuum is imaged at a resolution of $\sim$8$"$, revealing the morphology of the molecular environment around the star. The continuum emission is unresolved and peaks at the position of the star. The radio recombination line H30$\alpha$ shows unresolved emission at the star, with an approximately gaussian spectrum centered on a velocity of 21$\pm$3~km/s with a width of 57$\pm$6~km/s. In contrast, the CO 2-1 emission is complex and decomposes into several components beyond the contamination from interstellar gas in the line of sight. The CO spectrum toward the star is a broad plateau, centered at the systemic velocity of +18 km/s and with an expansion velocity of 100$\pm$10 km/s. Assuming isotropic and constant mass-loss, we estimate a mass-loss rate of 8$\pm$1.5 $\times10^{-5}$~M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. At a radius of 25$"$ from the star, we detect CO emission associated with the dust ring previously imaged by {\it Herschel}. The kinematics of this ring, however, is not consistent with an expanding shell, but show a velocity gradient of $v_{sys} \pm$20 km/s. In addition, we find a puzzling bright feature radially connecting the star to the CO ring, at a velocity of +40 km/s relative to the star. This spur feature may trace a unidirectional ejection event from the star. Our ACA observations reveal the complex morphology around IRAS 17163 and illustrate the breakthroughs that ALMA will bring to the field of massive stellar evolution.
  • The mechanism behind the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae is still poorly understood. Accurately tracing the molecule-rich equatorial regions of post-AGB stars can give valuable insight into the ejection mechanisms at work. We investigate the physical conditions, structure and velocity field of the dense molecular region of the planetary nebula NGC 6302 by means of ALMA band 7 interferometric maps. The high spatial resolution of the $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO J=3-2 ALMA data allows for an analysis of the geometry of the ejecta in unprecedented detail. We built a spatio-kinematical model of the molecular region with the software SHAPE and performed detailed non-LTE calculations of excitation and radiative transfer with the SHAPEMOL plug-in. We find that the molecular region consists of a massive ring out of which a system of fragments of lobe walls emerge and enclose the base of the lobes visible in the optical. The general properties of this region are in agreement with previous works, although the much greater spatial resolution of the data allows for a very detailed description. We confirm that the mass of the molecular region is 0.1 M$_{\odot}$. Additionally, we report a previously undetected component at the nebular equator, an inner, younger ring inclined $\sim$60$^\circ$ with respect to the main ring, showing a characteristic radius of 7.5$\times$10$^{16}$ cm, a mass of 2.7$\times$10$^{-3}$ M$_{\odot}$, and a counterpart in optical images of the nebula. This inner ring has the same kinematical age as the northwest optical lobes, implying it was ejected approximately at the same time, hundreds of years after the ejection of the bulk of the molecular ring-like region. We discuss a sequence of events leading to the formation of the molecular and optical nebulae, and briefly speculate on the origin of this intriguing inner ring.
  • We carried out a millimeter wavelength line survey between 79 and 356 GHz with the IRAM-30m telescope to investigate the physical and chemical properties of the molecular envelope of the oxygen-rich AGB star IK Tau. We analysed the molecular lines detected using the population diagram technique to derive rotational temperatures and column densities. Additionally, we conducted a radiative transfer analysis of the SO$_2$ lines detected. For the first time in this source we detected rotational lines in the ground vibrational state of HCO$^+$, NS, NO, and H$_2$CO, as well as several isotopologues of molecules previously identified. We also detected several rotational lines in vibrationally excited states of SiS and SiO isotopologues, and rotational lines of H$_2$O ($\nu_{\mathrm{2}}$=2). We have also increased the number of rotational lines detected of molecules that were previously identified, enabling a detailed study of the molecular abundances and excitation temperatures. IK Tau displays a rich chemistry for an oxygen-rich circumstellar envelope. We highlight the detection of NS and H$_2$CO with fractional abundances of f(NS)$\sim$10$^{-8}$ and f(H$_2$CO)$\sim$[10$^{-7}$--10$^{-8}$]. Most of the molecules display rotational temperatures between 15 and 40 K. NaCl and SiS isotopologues display rotational temperatures higher than the average (~65 K). In the case of SO$_2$ a warm component with $T_{\mathrm{rot}}$$\sim$290 K is also detected. This SO$_2$ warm component is probably arising from the inner regions of the envelope (at $\sim$8$R_{*}$) where SO$_2$ has a fractional abundance of f(SO$_2$)$\sim$10$^{-6}$. This result should be considered for future investigation of the main formation channels of this, and other, parent species in the inner winds of O-rich AGB stars, which at present are not well reproduced by current chemistry models.
  • Our knowledge of the chemical properties of the circumstellar ejecta of the most massive evolved stars is particularly poor. We aim to study the chemical characteristics of the prototypical yellow hypergiant star, IRC +10420. For this purpose, we obtained full line surveys at 1 and 3mm atmospheric windows. We have identified 106 molecular emission lines from 22 molecular species. Approximately half of the molecules detected are N-bearing species, in particular HCN, HNC, CN, NO, NS, PN, and N2H+. We used rotational diagrams to derive the density and rotational temperature of the different molecular species detected. We introduced an iterative method that allows us to take moderate line opacities into account. We have found that IRC +10420 presents high abundances of the N-bearing molecules compared with O-rich evolved stars. This result supports the presence of a N-rich chemistry, expected for massive stars. Our analysis also suggests a decrease of the 12C/13C ratio from \gtrsim 7 to \sim 3.7 in the last 3800 years, which can be directly related to the nitrogen enrichment observed. In addition, we found that SiO emission presents a significant intensity decrease for high-J lines when compared with older observations. Radiative transfer modeling shows that this variation can be explained by a decrease in the infrared (IR) flux of the dust. The origin of this decrease might be an expansion of the dust shell or a lower stellar temperature due to the pulsation of the star.
  • IRC+10216 is a circumstellar envelope around a carbon-rich evolved star which contains a large variety of molecules. According to interferometric observations, molecules are distributed either concentrated around the central star or as a hollow shell with a radius of 15". We present ALMA Cycle 0 band 6 observations of the J=14-13 rotational transition of CH3CN in IRC+10216, obtained with an angular resolution of 0.76x0.61". The bulk of the emission is distributed as a hollow shell located at just 2" from the star, with a void of emission in the central region up to a radius of 1". This spatial distribution is markedly different from those found to date in this source for other molecules. Our analysis indicate that methyl cyanide is not formed neither in the stellar photosphere nor far in the outer envelope, but at radial distances as short as 1-2", reaching a maximum abundance of 0.02 molecules cm-3 at 2" from the star. Standard chemical models of IRC+10216 predict that the bulk of CH3CN molecules should be present at a radius of 15", where other species such as polyyne radicals and cyanopolyynes are observed, with an additional inner component within 1" from the star. The non-uniform structure of the circumstellar envelope and grain surface processes are discussed as possible causes of the peculiar distribution of methyl cyanide in IRC+10216.
  • We report the detection during the ALMA Cycle 0 of SiS rotational lines in high-vibrational states as well as SiO and SiC$_2$ lines in their ground vibrational state, towards IRC+10216. The spatial distribution of these molecules shows compact emission for SiS and a more extended emission for SiO and SiC$_2$, and also proves the existence of an increase in the SiC$_2$ emission at the outer shells of the circumstellar envelope. We analyze the excitation conditions of the vibrationally excited SiS using the population diagram technique and we used a large velocity gradient model to compare with the observations. We found moderate discrepancies between the observations and the models that could be explained if SiS lines detected are optically thick. Additionally, the line profiles of the detected rotational lines in the high energy vibrational states show a decreasing linewidth with increasing energy levels. This may evidence that these lines could be excited only in the inner shells, i.e. the densest and hottest, of the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216.
  • We report the discovery in space of a disilicon species, SiCSi, from observations between 80 and 350 GHz with the IRAM 30m radio telescope. Owing to the close coordination between laboratory experiments and astrophysics, 112 lines have now been detected in the carbon-rich star CWLeo. The derived frequencies yield improved rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to sixth order. From the line profiles and interferometric maps with the Submillimeter Array, the bulk of the SiCSi emis- sion arises from a region of 6 arcseconds in radius. The derived abundance is comparable to that of SiC2. As expected from chemical equilibrium calculations, SiCSi and SiC2 are the most abundant species harboring a SiC bond in the dust formation zone and certainly both play a key role in the formation of SiC dust grains.
  • OH231.8+4.2 is a well studied O-rich CSE around an intermediate-mass evolved star that displays bipolar molecular outflows accelerated up to 400 km/s. OH231 also presents an exceptional molecular richness probably due to shock-induced chemical processes. We report the first detection in this source of HNCO, HNCS, HC3N and NO, with the IRAM-30m telescope in a sensitive mm-wavelength survey towards this target. HNCO and HNCS are also first detections in CSEs. The observed line profiles show that the emission arises in the massive central component of the envelope and at the base of the fast lobes. The NO profiles are broader than those of HNCO, HNCS, and HC3N, and most importantly, broader than the line profiles of 13CO. This indicates that the NO abundance is enhanced in the fast lobes relative to the slow, central parts. From LTE and non-LTE excitation analysis, we estimate beam-average rotational temperatures of 15-30 K (and, maybe, up to 55 K for HC3N) and fractional abundances of X(HNCO)=[0.8-1]E-7, X(HNCS)=[0.9-1]E-8, X(HC3N)=[5-7]E-9 and X(NO)=[1-2]E-6. NO is, therefore, amongst the most abundant N-bearing species in OH231. We have performed thermodynamical chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics models to investigate the formation of these N-bearing species in OH231. The model underestimates the observed abundances for HNCO, HNCS, and HC3N by several orders of magnitude, which indicates that these molecules can hardly be products of standard UV-photon and/or cosmic-ray induced chemistry in OH231, and that other processes (e.g. shocks) play a major role in their formation. For NO, the model abundance is compatible with the observed average value. The new detections presented in this work corroborate the particularly rich chemistry of OH231, which is likely profoundly influenced by shock-induced processes, as proposed in earlier works.
  • OH 231.8+4.2, a bipolar outflow around a Mira-type variable star, displays a unique molecular richness amongst circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around O-rich AGB and post-AGB stars. We report line observations of the HCO+ and H13CO+ molecular ions and the first detection of SO+, N2H+, and (tentatively) H3O+ in this source. SO+ and H3O+ have not been detected before in CSEs around evolved stars. These data have been obtained as part of a full mm-wave and far-IR spectral line survey carried out with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope and with Herschel/HIFI. Except for H3O+, all the molecular ions detected in this work display emission lines with broad profiles (FWHM 50-90 km/s), which indicates that these ions are abundant in the fast bipolar outflow of OH 231.8. The narrow profile (FWHM 14 km/s) and high critical densities (>1e6cm-3 ) of the H3O+ transitions observed are consistent with this ion arising from denser, inner (and presumably warmer) layers of the fossil remnant of the slow AGB CSE at the core of the nebula. From rotational diagram analysis, we deduce excitation temperatures of Tex 10-20 K for all ions except for H3O+, which is most consistent with Tex 100 K. Although uncertain, the higher excitation temperature suspected for H3O+ is similar to that recently found for H2O and a few other molecules, which selectively trace a previously unidentified, warm nebular component.The column densities of the molecular ions reported here are in the range Ntot [1-8]x1e13 cm-2, leading to beam-averaged fractional abundances relative to H2 of X(HCO+) 1e-8, X(H13CO+) 2e-9, X(SO+) 4e-9, X(N2H+) 2e-9, and X(H3O+) 7e-9 cm-2. We have performed chemical kinetics models to investigate the formation of these ions in OH 231.8 as the result of standard gas phase reactions initiated by cosmic-ray and UV-photon ionization. (abridged).
  • We report on the discovery of strong intensity variations in the high rotational lines of abundant molecular species towards the archetypical circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216. The observations have been carried out with the HIFI instrument on board \textit{Herschel}\thanks{\textit{Herschel} is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA} and with the IRAM\thanks{This work was based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30-meter telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain)} 30-m telescope. They cover several observing periods spreading over 3 years. The line intensity variations for molecules produced in the external layers of the envelope most probably result from time variations in the infrared pumping rates. We analyze the main implications this discovery has on the interpretation of molecular line emission in the envelopes of Mira-type stars. Radiative transfer calculations have to take into account both the time variability of infrared pumping and the possible variation of the dust and gas temperatures with stellar phase in order to reproduce the observation of molecular lines at different epochs. The effect of gas temperature variations with stellar phase could be particularly important for lines produced in the innermost regions of the envelope. Each layer of the circumstellar envelope sees the stellar light radiation with a different lag time (phase). Our results show that this effect must be included in the models. The sub-mm and FIR lines of AGB stars cannot anymore be considered as safe intensity calibrators.
  • We aim to better understand the emission of molecular tracers of the diffuse and dense gas in giant molecular clouds and the influence that metallicity, optical extinction, density, far-UV field, and star formation rate have on these tracers. Using the IRAM 30m telescope, we detected HCN, HCO+, 12CO, and 13CO in six GMCs along the major axis of M33 at a resolution of ~ 114pc and out to a radial distance of 3.4kpc. Optical, far-infrared, and submillimeter data from Herschel and other observatories complement these observations. To interpret the observed molecular line emission, we created two grids of models of photon-dominated regions, one for solar and one for M33-type subsolar metallicity. The observed HCO+/HCN line ratios range between 1.1 and 2.5. Similarly high ratios have been observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The HCN/CO ratio varies between 0.4% and 2.9% in the disk of M33. The 12CO/13CO line ratio varies between 9 and 15 similar to variations found in the diffuse gas and the centers of GMCs of the Milky Way. Stacking of all spectra allowed HNC and C2H to be detected. The resulting HCO+/HNC and HCN/HNC ratios of ~ 8 and 6, respectively, lie at the high end of ratios observed in a large set of (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies. HCN abundances are lower in the subsolar metallicity PDR models, while HCO+ abundances are enhanced. For HCN this effect is more pronounced at low optical extinctions. The observed HCO+/HCN and HCN/CO line ratios are naturally explained by subsolar PDR models of low optical extinctions between 4 and 10 mag and of moderate densities of n = 3x10^3 - 3x10^4 cm^-3, while the FUV field strength only has a small effect on the modeled line ratios. The line ratios are almost equally well reproduced by the solar-metallicity models, indicating that variations in metallicity only play a minor role in influencing these line ratios.
  • We present the results of a series of radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the BL Lac object S50716+714 carried out between April 2007 and January 2011. The multi-frequency observations were obtained using several ground and space based facilities. The intense optical monitoring of the source reveals faster repetitive variations superimposed on a long-term variability trend at a time scale of ~350 days. Episodes of fast variability recur on time scales of ~ 60-70 days. The intense and simultaneous activity at optical and gamma-ray frequencies favors the SSC mechanism for the production of the high-energy emission. Two major low-peaking radio flares were observed during this high optical/gamma-ray activity period. The radio flares are characterized by a rising and a decaying stage and are in agreement with the formation of a shock and its evolution. We found that the evolution of the radio flares requires a geometrical variation in addition to intrinsic variations of the source. Different estimates yield a robust and self-consistent lower limits of \delta > 20 and equipartition magnetic field B_eq > 0.36 G. Causality arguments constrain the size of emission region \theta < 0.004 mas. We found a significant correlation between flux variations at radio frequencies with those at optical and gamma-rays. The optical/GeV flux variations lead the radio variability by ~65 days. The longer time delays between low-peaking radio outbursts and optical flares imply that optical flares are the precursors of radio ones. An orphan X-ray flare challenges the simple, one-zone emission models, rendering them too simple. Here we also describe the spectral energy distribution modeling of the source from simultaneous data taken through different activity periods.
  • Within the framework of the Herschel M 33 extended survey HerM33es we study the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of a set of HII regions in M 33 as a function of the morphology. We present a catalogue of 119 HII regions morphologically classified: 9 filled, 47 mixed, 36 shell, and 27 clear shell HII regions. For each object we extract the photometry at twelve available wavelength bands (from FUV-1516A to IR-250mi) and obtain the SED. We also obtain emission line profiles across the regions to study the location of the stellar, ionised gas, and dust components. We find trends for the SEDs related to the morphology, showing that the star and gas-dust configuration affects the ratios of the emission in different bands. The mixed and filled regions show higher emission at 24mi than the shells and clear shells, which could be due to the proximity of the dust to the stellar clusters in the case of mixed and filled regions. The FIR peak for shells and clear shells seems to be located towards longer wavelengths, indicating that the dust is colder for this type of objects.The logarithmic 100/70mi ratio for filled and mixed regions remains constant over one order of magnitude in Halpha and FUV surface brightness, while the shells and clear shells exhibit a wider range of values of almost two orders of magnitude. We derive dust masses and temperatures fitting the individual SEDs with dust models proposed in the literature. The derived dust mass range is between 10^2-10^4 Msun and the cold dust temperature spans T(cold)~12-27 K. The spherical geometrical model proposed for the Halpha clear shells is confirmed by the emission profile obtained from the observations and is used to infer the electron density within the envelope: the typical electron density is 0.7+-0.3 cm^-3, while filled regions can reach values two to five times higher.
  • Red supergiant stars (RSGs) and yellow hypergiant stars (YHGs) are believed to be the high-mass counterparts of stars in the AGB and early post-AGB phases. We study the mass-loss in the post main-sequence evolution of massive stars, through the properties of their envelopes in the intermediate and warm gas layers. These are the regions where the acceleration of the gas takes place and the most recent mass-loss episodes can be seen. We used the HIFI instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory to observe sub-mm and FIR transitions of CO, water, and their isotopologues in a sample of two RSGs (NML Cyg and Betelgeuse) and two YHGs (IRC+10420 and AFGL 2343) stars. We present an inventory of the detected lines and analyse the information revealed by their spectral profiles. On the basis of the results presented in an earlier study, we model the CO and 13CO emission in IRC+10420 and compare it to a set of lines ranging from the mm, to the FIR. Red supergiants have stronger high-excitation lines than the YHGs, indicating that they harbour dense and hot inner shells contributing to these transitions. Consequently, these high-J lines in RSGs originate from acceleration layers that have not yet reached the circumstellar terminal velocity and have narrower profiles than their flat-topped lower-J counterparts. The YHGs tend to lack this inner component, in line with the picture of detached, hollow envelopes derived from studies at longer wavelengths. NH3 is only detected in two sources (NML Cyg, IRC+10420), which are also observed to be the strongest water-line emitters of the studied sample. In contrast, OH is detected in all sources and does not seem to correlate with the water line intensities. We show that the IRC+10420 model derived solely from mm low-J CO transitions is capable of reproducing the high-J transitions when the temperature in the inner shell is simply lowered by about 30%.
  • We study the far-infrared emission from the nearby spiral galaxy M33 in order to investigate the dust physical properties such as the temperature and the luminosity density across the galaxy. Taking advantage of the unique wavelength coverage (100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 micron) of the Herschel Space Observatory and complementing our dataset with Spitzer-IRAC 5.8 and 8 micron and Spitzer-MIPS 24 and 70 micron data, we construct temperature and luminosity density maps by fitting two modified blackbodies of a fixed emissivity index of 1.5. We find that the 'cool' dust grains are heated at temperatures between 11 and 28 K with the lowest temperatures found in the outskirts of the galaxy and the highest ones in the center and in the bright HII regions. The infrared/submillimeter total luminosity (5 - 1000 micron) is estimated to be 1.9x10^9 Lsun. 59% of the total luminosity of the galaxy is produced by the 'cool' dust grains (~15 K) while the rest 41% is produced by 'warm' dust grains (~55 K). The ratio of the cool-to-warm dust luminosity is close to unity (within the computed uncertainties), throughout the galaxy, with the luminosity of the cool dust being slightly enhanced in the center of the galaxy. Decomposing the emission of the dust into two components (one emitted by the diffuse disk of the galaxy and one emitted by the spiral arms) we find that the fraction of the emission in the disk in the mid-infrared (24 micron) is 21%, while it gradually rises up to 57% in the submillimeter (500 micron). We find that the bulk of the luminosity comes from the spiral arm network that produces 70% of the total luminosity of the galaxy with the rest coming from the diffuse dust disk. The 'cool' dust inside the disk is heated at a narrow range of temperatures between 18 and 15 K (going from the center to the outer parts of the galaxy).
  • Context: The emission line of [CII] at 158 micron is one of the strongest cooling lines of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. Aims: Disentangling the relative contributions of the different ISM phases to [CII] emission, is a major topic of the HerM33es program, a Herschel key project to study the ISM in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. Methods: Using PACS, we have mapped the emission of [CII] 158 micron, [OI] 63 micron, and other FIR lines in a 2'x2' region of the northern spiral arm of M33, centered on the HII region BCLMP302. At the peak of H-alpha emission, we have observed in addition a velocity resolved [CII] spectrum using HIFI. We use scatterplots to compare these data with PACS 160 micron continuum maps, and with maps of CO and HI data, at a common resolution of 12 arcsec or 50 pc. Maps of H-alpha and 24 micron emission observed with Spitzer are used to estimate the SFR. We have created maps of the [CII] and [OI] 63 micron emission and detected [NII] 122 micron and NIII 57 micron at individual positions. Results: The [CII] line observed with HIFI is significantly broader than that of CO, and slightly blue-shifted. In addition, there is little spatial correlation between [CII] observed with PACS and CO over the mapped region. There is even less spatial correlation between [CII] and the atomic gas traced by HI. Detailed comparison of the observed intensities towards the HII region with models of photo ionization and photon dominated regions, confirms that a significant fraction, 20--30%, of the observed [CII] emission stems from the ionized gas and not from the molecular cloud. The gas heating efficiency, using the ratio between [CII] and the TIR as a proxy, varies between 0.07 and 1.5%, with the largest variations found outside the HII region.
  • We performed Herschel/HIFI observations of several CO lines in the far-infrared/sub-mm in the protoplanetary nebula CRL618. The high spectral resolution provided by HIFI allows measurement of the line profiles. Since the dynamics and structure of the nebula is well known from mm-wave interferometric maps, it is possible to identify the contributions of the different nebular components (fast bipolar outflows, double shells, compact slow shell) to the line profiles. The observation of these relatively high-energy transitions allows an accurate study of the excitation conditions in these components, particularly in the warm ones, which cannot be properly studied from the low-energy lines. The 12CO J=16-15, 10-9, and 6-5 lines are easily detected in this source. 13CO J=10-9 and 6-5 are also detected. Wide profiles showing spectacular line wings have been found, particularly in 12CO 16-15. Other lines observed simultaneously with CO are also shown. Our analysis of the CO high-J transitions, when compared with the existing models, confirms the very low expansion velocity of the central, dense component, which probably indicates that the shells ejected during the last AGB phases were driven by radiation pressure under a regime of maximum transfer of momentum. No contribution of the diffuse halo found from mm-wave data is identified in our spectra, because of its low temperature. We find that the fast bipolar outflow is quite hot, much hotter than previously estimated; for instance, gas flowing at 100 km/s must have a temperature higher than ~ 200 K. Probably, this very fast outflow, with a kinematic age < 100 yr, has been accelerated by a shock and has not yet cooled down. The double empty shell found from mm-wave mapping must also be relatively hot, in agreement with the previous estimate.
  • We present an analysis of the first space-based far-IR-submm observations of M 33, which measure the emission from the cool dust and resolve the giant molecular cloud complexes. With roughly half-solar abundances, M33 is a first step towards young low-metallicity galaxies where the submm may be able to provide an alternative to CO mapping to measure their H$_2$ content. In this Letter, we measure the dust emission cross-section $\sigma$ using SPIRE and recent CO and \HI\ observations; a variation in $\sigma$ is present from a near-solar neighborhood cross-section to about half-solar with the maximum being south of the nucleus. Calculating the total H column density from the measured dust temperature and cross-section, and then subtracting the \HI\ column, yields a morphology similar to that observed in CO. The H$_2$/\HI\ mass ratio decreases from about unity to well below 10% and is about 15% averaged over the optical disk. The single most important observation to reduce the potentially large systematic errors is to complete the CO mapping of M 33.
  • Within the framework of the HERM33ES Key Project, using the high resolution and sensitivity of the Herschel photometric data, we study the compact emission in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33 to investigate the nature of the compact SPIRE emission sources. We extracted a catalogue of sources at 250um in order to investigate the nature of this compact emission. Taking advantage of the unprecedented Herschel resolution at these wavelengths, we also focus on a more precise study of some striking Halpha shells in the northern part of the galaxy. We present a catalogue of 159 compact emission sources in M33 identified by SExtractor in the 250um SPIRE band that is the one that provides the best spatial resolution. We also measured fluxes at 24um and Halpha for those 159 extracted sources. The morphological study of the shells also benefits from a multiwavelength approach including Halpha, far-UV from GALEX, and infrared from both Spitzer IRAC 8um and MIPS 24um in order to make comparisons. For the 159 compact sources selected at 250um, we find a very strong Pearson correlation coefficient with the MIPS 24um emission (r24 = 0.94) and a rather strong correlation with the Halpha emission, although with more scatter (rHa = 0.83). The morphological study of the Halpha shells shows a displacement between far-ultraviolet, Halpha, and the SPIRE bands. The cool dust emission from SPIRE clearly delineates the Halpha shell structures. The very strong link between the 250um compact emission and the 24um and Halpha emissions, by recovering the star formation rate from standard recipes for HII regions, allows us to provide star formation rate calibrations based on the 250um compact emission alone. The different locations of the Halpha and far-ultraviolet emissions with respect to the SPIRE cool dust emission leads to a dynamical age of a few Myr for the Halpha shells and the associated cool dust.
  • Over the past few years several studies have provided estimates of the SFR (star-formation rate) or the total infrared luminosity from just one infrared band. However these relations are generally derived for entire galaxies, which are known to contain a large scale diffuse emission that is not necessarily related to the latest star-formation episode. We provide new relations to estimate the SFR from resolved star-forming regions at 100 mum and 160 mum. We select individual star-forming regions in the nearby (840 kpc) galaxy M33. We estimate the SFR combining the emission in Halpha and at 24 mum to calibrate the emission at 100 mum and 160 mum as SFR estimators, as mapped with PACS/Herschel. The data are obtained in the framework of the HERM33ES open time key project. There is less emission in the HII regions at 160 mum than at 100 mum. Over a dynamic range of almost 2 dex in Sigma(SFR) we find that the 100 mum emission is a nearly linear estimator of the SFR, whereas that at 160 mum is slightly superlinear. The behaviour of individual star-forming regions is surprisingly similar to that of entire galaxies. At high Sigma(SFR), star formation drives the dust temperature, whereas uncertainties and variations in radiation-transfer and dust-heated processes dominate at low Sigma(SFR). Detailed modelling of both galaxies and individual star forming regions will be needed to interpret similarities and differences between the two and assess the fraction of diffuse emission in galaxies.
  • We have performed mm-wave observations with the IRAM 30m telescope of the 12CO J=2-1 and J=1-0, 13CO J=2-1 and J=1-0, and SiO J=5-4 transitions in the symbiotic stars R Aqr, CH Cyg, and HM Sge. The data were analyzed by means of a simple analytical description of the general properties of molecular emission from the inner shells around the cool star. Numerical calculations of the expected line profiles, taking into account the level population and radiative transfer under such conditions, were also performed. Weak emission of 12CO J=2-1 and J=1-0 was detected in R Aqr and CH Cyg; a good line profile of 12CO J=2-1 in R Aqr was obtained. The intensities and profile shapes of the detected lines are compatible with emission coming from a very small shell around the Mira-type star, with a radius comparable to or slightly smaller than the distance to the hot dwarf companion, 10$^{14}$ - 2 10$^{14}$ cm. We argue that other possible explanations are improbable. This region probably shows properties similar to those characteristic of the inner shells around standard AGB stars: outwards expansion at about 5 - 25 km/s, with a significant acceleration of the gas, temperatures decreasing with radius between about 1000 and 500 K, and densities ~ 10$^9$ - 3 10$^8$ cm$^{-3}$. Our model calculations are able to explain the asymmetric line shape observed in 12CO J=2-1 from R Aqr, in which the relatively weaker red part of the profile would result from selfabsorption by the outer layers (in the presence of a velocity increase and a temperature decrease with radius). The mass-loss rates are somewhat larger than in standard AGB stars, as often happens for symbiotic systems. In R Aqr, we find that the total mass of the CO emitting region is ~ 2 - 3 10$^{-5}$ Mo, corresponding to M' ~ 5 10$^{-6}$ - 10$^{-5}$ Mo/yr, and compatible with results obtained from dust emission. Taking into account other existing data on molecular emission, we suggest that the small extent of the molecule-rich gas in symbiotic systems is mainly due to molecule photodissociation by the radiation of the hot dwarf star.