• The design, construction, and commissioning of the ALICE Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) is described. It is the main device for pattern recognition, tracking, and identification of charged particles in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. The TPC is cylindrical in shape with a volume close to 90 m^3 and is operated in a 0.5 T solenoidal magnetic field parallel to its axis. In this paper we describe in detail the design considerations for this detector for operation in the extreme multiplicity environment of central Pb--Pb collisions at LHC energy. The implementation of the resulting requirements into hardware (field cage, read-out chambers, electronics), infrastructure (gas and cooling system, laser-calibration system), and software led to many technical innovations which are described along with a presentation of all the major components of the detector, as currently realized. We also report on the performance achieved after completion of the first round of stand-alone calibration runs and demonstrate results close to those specified in the TPC Technical Design Report.
  • The large TPC ($95 \mathrm{m}^3$) of the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC was commissioned in summer 2006. The first tracks were observed both from the cosmic ray muons and from the laser rays injected into the TPC. In this article the basic principles of operating the $266 \mathrm{nm}$ lasers are presented, showing the installation and adjustment of the optical system and describing the control system. To generate the laser tracks, a wide laser beam is split into several hundred narrow beams by fixed micro-mirrors at stable and known positions throughout the TPC. In the drift volume, these narrow beams generate straight tracks at many angles. Here we describe the generation of the first tracks and compare them with simulations.
  • A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) is the only experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) dedicated to the study of heavy ion collisions. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector covering the pseudo rapidity range $|\eta|< 0.9$. It is designed for a maximum multiplicity \dNdy = 8000. The aim of the laser system is to simulate ionizing tracks at predifined positions throughout the drift volume in order to monitor the TPC response to a known source. In particular, the alignment of the read-out chambers will be performed, and variations of the drift velocity due to drift field imperfections can be measured and used as calibration data in the physics data analysis. In this paper we present the design of the pulsed UV laser and optical system, together with the control and monitoring systems.
  • The space-time evolution of the source of particles formed in the collision of nuclei can be studied through particle correlations. The STAR experiment is dedicated to study ultra-relativistic heavy ions collisions and allows to measure non-identical strange particle correlations. The source size can be extracted by studying $p-\Lambda$, $\bar{p}-\bar{\Lambda}$, $\bar{p}-\Lambda$ and $p-\bar{\Lambda}$ correlation functions. Strong interaction potential has been studied for these systems using an analytical model. Final State Interaction (FSI) parameters have been determined and has shown a significant annihilation process present in $\bar{p}-\Lambda$ and $p-\bar{\Lambda}$ systems not present in $p-\Lambda$ and $\bar{p}-\bar{\Lambda}$.
  • Information about the space-time evolution of colliding nuclei can be extracted correlating particles emitted from nuclear collisions. The high density of particles produced in the STAR experiment allows the measurement of non-identical strange particle correlations. Due to the absence of Coulomb interaction, $p-\Lambda$ and $\bar{p}-\Lambda$ systems are more sensitive to the source size than $p-p$ pairs. Strong interaction potential has been studied using $p-\Lambda$, and for the first time, $\bar{p}-\Lambda$ pairs. The experimental correlation functions have been described in the frame of a model based on the $p-n$ interaction. The first preliminary measurement of $\pi$ - $\Xi$ correlations has been performed, allowing to extract information about the freeze-out time and the space-time asymmetries in particle emission closely related to the transverse radial expansion and decay of resonances.