• Using a sample of 4 galaxy clusters at $1.35 < z < 1.65$ and 10 galaxy clusters at $0.85 < z < 1.35$, we measure the environmental quenching timescale, $t_Q$, corresponding to the time required after a galaxy is accreted by a cluster for it to fully cease star formation. Cluster members are selected by a photometric-redshift criterion, and categorized as star-forming, quiescent, or intermediate according to their dust-corrected rest-frame colors and magnitudes. We employ a "delayed-then-rapid" quenching model that relates a simulated cluster mass accretion rate to the observed numbers of each type of galaxy in the cluster to constrain $t_Q$. For galaxies of mass $M_* \gtrsim 10^{10.5}~ \mathrm{M}_\odot$, we find a quenching timescale of $t_Q=$ 1.24 Gyr in the $z\sim1.5$ cluster sample, and $t_Q=$ 1.50 Gyr at $z\sim1$. Using values drawn from the literature, we compare the redshift evolution of $t_Q$ to timescales predicted for different physical quenching mechanisms. We find $t_Q$ to depend on host halo mass such that quenching occurs over faster timescales in clusters relative to groups, suggesting that properties of the host halo are responsible for quenching high-mass galaxies. Between $z=0$ and $z=1.5$, we find that $t_Q$ evolves faster than the molecular gas depletion timescale and slower than an SFR-outflow timescale, but is consistent with the evolution of the dynamical time. This suggests that environmental quenching in these galaxies is driven by the motion of satellites relative to the cluster environment, although due to uncertainties in the atomic gas budget at high redshift, we cannot rule out quenching due to simple gas depletion.
  • We present ALMA CO (2-1) detections in 11 gas-rich cluster galaxies at z~1.6, constituting the largest sample of molecular gas measurements in z>1.5 clusters to date. The observations span three galaxy clusters, derived from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey. We augment the >5sigma detections of the CO (2-1) fluxes with multi-band photometry, yielding stellar masses and infrared-derived star formation rates, to place some of the first constraints on molecular gas properties in z~1.6 cluster environments. We measure sizable gas reservoirs of 0.5-2x10^11 solar masses in these objects, with high gas fractions and long depletion timescales, averaging 62% and 1.4 Gyr, respectively. We compare our cluster galaxies to the scaling relations of the coeval field, in the context of how gas fractions and depletion timescales vary with respect to the star-forming main sequence. We find that our cluster galaxies lie systematically off the field scaling relations at z=1.6 toward enhanced gas fractions, at a level of ~4sigma, but have consistent depletion timescales. Exploiting CO detections in lower-redshift clusters from the literature, we investigate the evolution of the gas fraction in cluster galaxies, finding it to mimic the strong rise with redshift in the field. We emphasize the utility of detecting abundant gas-rich galaxies in high-redshift clusters, deeming them as crucial laboratories for future statistical studies.
  • We study the evolution of spectral early-type galaxies in clusters, groups and the field up to redshift 0.9 using the EDisCS dataset. We measure Re, Ie, and sigma for 154 cluster and 68 field galaxies. We study the evolution of the zero point of the fundamental plane (FP) and confirm results in the literature, but now also for the low cluster velocity dispersion regime. The mass-to-light ratio varies as Delta log M/L_B=(-0.54+-0.01)z=(-1.61+-0.01)log(1+z) in clusters, independent of their velocity dispersion. The evolution is stronger (Delta log M/L_B=(-0.76+-0.01)z=(-2.27+-0.03)log(1+z)) for field galaxies. The FP residuals correlate with galaxy mass and become progressively negative at low masses. The effect is visible at z>=0.7 for cluster galaxies and at z>=0.5 for field galaxies. We investigate the size evolution of our galaxy sample. We find that the half-luminosity radius for a galaxy with a dynamical or stellar mass of 2x10^11 Msol varies as (1+z)^{-1.0+-0.3} for both cluster and field galaxies. At the same time, stellar velocity dispersions grow with redshift, as (1+z)^{0.59+-0.10} at constant dynamical mass, and as (1+z)^{0.34+- 0.14} at constant stellar mass. The measured size evolution reduces to Re (1+z)^{-0.5+- 0.2} and sigma (1+z)^{0.41+-0.08}, at fixed dynamical masses, and Re (1+z)^{-0.68+-0.4} and sigma (1+z)^{0.19+-0.10}, at fixed stellar masses, when the progenitor bias (galaxies that locally are of spectroscopic early-type, but not very old, disappear from the EDisCS high-redshift sample; these galaxies tend to be large in size) is taken into account. Taken together, the variations in size and velocity dispersion imply that the luminosity evolution with redshift derived from the zero point of the FP is somewhat milder than that derived without taking these variations into account.
  • The modern merger hypothesis offers a method of forming a new elliptical galaxy through merging two equal-mass, gas-rich disk galaxies fuelling a nuclear starburst followed by efficient quenching and dynamical stabilization. A key prediction of this scenario is a central concentration of young stars during the brief phase of morphological transformation from highly-disturbed remnant to new elliptical galaxy. To test this aspect of the merger hypothesis, we use integral field spectroscopy to track the stellar Balmer absorption and 4000\AA\ break strength indices as a function of galactic radius for 12 massive (${\rm M_{*}}\ge10^{10}{\rm M_{\odot}}$), nearby (${\rm z}\le0.03$), visually-selected plausible new ellipticals with blue-cloud optical colours and varying degrees of morphological peculiarities. We find that these index values and their radial dependence correlate with specific morphological features such that the most disturbed galaxies have the smallest 4000\AA\ break strengths and the largest Balmer absorption values. Overall, two-thirds of our sample are inconsistent with the predictions of the modern merger hypothesis. Of these eight, half exhibit signatures consistent with recent minor merger interactions. The other half have star formation histories similar to local, quiescent early-type galaxies. Of the remaining four galaxies, three have the strong morphological disturbances and star-forming optical colours consistent with being remnants of recent, gas-rich major mergers, but exhibit a weak, central burst consistent with forming $\sim5\%$ of their stars. The final galaxy possesses spectroscopic signatures of a strong, centrally-concentrated starburst and quiescent core optical colours indicative of recent quenching (i.e., a post-starburst signature) as prescribed by the modern merger hypothesis.
  • We investigate the process of rapid star formation quenching in a sample of 12 massive galaxies at intermediate redshift (z~0.6) that host high-velocity ionized gas outflows (v>1000 km/s). We conclude that these fast outflows are most likely driven by feedback from star formation rather than active galactic nuclei (AGN). We use multiwavelength survey and targeted observations of the galaxies to assess their star formation, AGN activity, and morphology. Common attributes include diffuse tidal features indicative of recent mergers accompanied by bright, unresolved cores with effective radii less than a few hundred parsecs. The galaxies are extraordinarily compact for their stellar mass, even when compared with galaxies at z~2-3. For 9/12 galaxies, we rule out an AGN contribution to the nuclear light and hypothesize that the unresolved core comes from a compact central starburst triggered by the dissipative collapse of very gas-rich progenitor merging disks. We find evidence of AGN activity in half the sample but we argue that it accounts for only a small fraction (<10%) of the total bolometric luminosity. We find no correlation between AGN activity and outflow velocity and we conclude that the fast outflows in our galaxies are not powered by on-going AGN activity, but rather by recent, extremely compact starbursts.
  • The study of intracluster light can help us to understand the mechanisms taking place in galaxy clusters, and to place constraints on the cluster formation history and physical properties. However, owing to the intrinsic faintness of ICL emission, most searches and detailed studies of ICL have been limited to redshifts z<0.4.We search for ICL in a subsample of ten clusters detected by the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS), at redshifts 0.4<z<0.8, that are also part of our DAFT/FADA Survey. We analyze the ICL by applying the OV WAV package, a wavelet-based technique, to deep HST ACS images in the F814W filter and to V-band VLT/FORS2 images of three clusters. Detection levels are assessed as a function of the diffuse light source surface brightness using simulations. In the F814W filter images, we detect diffuse light sources in all the clusters, with typical sizes of a few tens of kpc (assuming that they are at the cluster redshifts). The ICL detected by stacking the ten F814W images shows an 8sigma detection in the source center extending over a ~50x50kpc2 area, with a total absolute magnitude of -21.6 in the F814W filter, equivalent to about two L* galaxies per cluster. We find a weak correlation between the total F814W absolute magnitude of the ICL and the cluster velocity dispersion and mass. There is no apparent correlation between the cluster mass-to-light ratio (M/L) and the amount of ICL, and no evidence for any preferential orientation in the ICL source distribution. We find no strong variation in the amount of ICL between z=0 and z=0.8. In addition, we find wavelet-detected compact objects (WDCOs) in the three clusters for which data in two bands are available; these objects are probably very faint compact galaxies that in some cases are members of the respective clusters. We have shown that ICL is important in clusters at least up to z=0.8.
  • D. Schlegel, F. Abdalla, T. Abraham, C. Ahn, C. Allende Prieto, J. Annis, E. Aubourg, M. Azzaro, S. Bailey. C. Baltay, C. Baugh, C. Bebek, S. Becerril, M. Blanton, A. Bolton, B. Bromley, R. Cahn, P.-H. Carton, J. L. Cervantes-Cota, Y. Chu, M. Cortes, K. Dawson, A. Dey, M. Dickinson, H. T. Diehl, P. Doel, A. Ealet, J. Edelstein, D. Eppelle, S. Escoffier, A. Evrard, L. Faccioli, C. Frenk, M. Geha, D. Gerdes, P. Gondolo, A. Gonzalez-Arroyo, B. Grossan, T. Heckman, H. Heetderks, S. Ho, K. Honscheid, D. Huterer, O. Ilbert, I. Ivans, P. Jelinsky, Y. Jing, D. Joyce, R. Kennedy, S. Kent, D. Kieda, A. Kim, C. Kim, J.-P. Kneib, X. Kong, A. Kosowsky, K. Krishnan, O. Lahav, M. Lampton, S. LeBohec, V. Le Brun, M. Levi, C. Li, M. Liang, H. Lim, W. Lin, E. Linder, W. Lorenzon, A. de la Macorra, Ch. Magneville, R. Malina, C. Marinoni, V. Martinez, S. Majewski, T. Matheson, R. McCloskey, P. McDonald, T. McKay, J. McMahon, B. Menard, J. Miralda-Escude, M. Modjaz, A. Montero-Dorta, I. Morales, N. Mostek, J. Newman, R. Nichol, P. Nugent, K. Olsen, N. Padmanabhan, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, I. Park, J. Peacock, W. Percival, S. Perlmutter, C. Peroux, P. Petitjean, F. Prada, E. Prieto, J. Prochaska, K. Reil, C. Rockosi, N. Roe, E. Rollinde, A. Roodman, N. Ross, G. Rudnick, V. Ruhlmann-Kleider, J. Sanchez, D. Sawyer, C. Schimd, M. Schubnell, R. Scoccimaro, U. Seljak, H. Seo, E. Sheldon, M. Sholl, R. Shulte-Ladbeck, A. Slosar, D. S. Smith, G. Smoot, W. Springer, A. Stril, A. S. Szalay, C. Tao, G. Tarle, E. Taylor, A. Tilquin, J. Tinker, F. Valdes, J. Wang, T. Wang, B. A. Weaver, D. Weinberg, M. White, M. Wood-Vasey, J. Yang, X. Yang. Ch. Yeche, N. Zakamska, A. Zentner, C. Zhai, P. Zhang
    June 9, 2011 astro-ph.IM
    BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (kmax = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (kmax = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.
  • With a complete, mass-selected sample of quiescent galaxies from the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS), we study the stellar populations of the oldest and most massive galaxies (>10^11 Msun) to high redshift. The sample includes 570 quiescent galaxies selected based on their extinction-corrected U-V colors out to z=2.2, with accurate photometric redshifts, sigma_z/(1+z)~2%, and rest-frame colors, sigma_U-V~0.06 mag. We measure an increase in the intrinsic scatter of the rest-frame U-V colors of quiescent galaxies with redshift. This scatter in color arises from the spread in ages of the quiescent galaxies, where we see both relatively quiescent red, old galaxies and quiescent blue, younger galaxies towards higher redshift. The trends between color and age are consistent with the observed composite rest-frame spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these galaxies. The composite SEDs of the reddest and bluest quiescent galaxies are fundamentally different, with remarkably well-defined 4000A- and Balmer-breaks, respectively. Some of the quiescent galaxies may be up to 4 times older than the average age- and up to the age of the universe, if the assumption of solar metallicity is correct. By matching the scatter predicted by models that include growth of the red sequence by the transformation of blue galaxies to the observed intrinsic scatter, the data indicate that most early-type galaxies formed their stars at high redshift with a burst of star formation prior to migrating to the red sequence. The observed U-V color evolution with redshift is weaker than passive evolution predicts; possible mechanisms to slow the color evolution include increasing amounts of dust in quiescent galaxies towards higher redshift, red mergers at z<1, and a frosting of relatively young stars from star formation at later times.
  • This paper reports the results obtained on the photometric redshifts measurement and accuracy, and cluster tomography in the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) fields. Photometric redshifts were computed using two independent codes (Hyperz and G. Rudnick's code). The accuracy of photometric redshifts was assessed by comparing our estimates with the spectroscopic redshifts of ~1400 galaxies in the 0.3<z<1.0 domain. The accuracy for galaxies fainter than the spectroscopic control sample was estimated using a degraded version of the photometric catalog for the spectroscopic sample. The accuracy of photometric redshifts is typically sigma(Delta z/(1+z)) ~ 0.05+/-0.01, depending on the field, the filter set, and the spectral type of the galaxies. The quality of the photometric redshifts degrades by a factor of two in sigma(Delta z/(1+z)) between the brightest (I~22) and the faintest (I~24-24.5) galaxies in the EDisCS sample. The photometric determination of cluster redshifts in the EDisCS fields using a simple algorithm based on photoz is in excellent agreement with the spectroscopic values (delta(z) ~0.03-0.04 in the high-z sample and ~0.05 in the low-z sample). We also developed a method that uses both photz codes jointly to reject interlopers at magnitudes fainter than the spectroscopic limit. When applied to the spectroscopic sample, this method rejects ~50-90% of all spectroscopically confirmed non-members, while retaining at least 90% of all confirmed members. Photometric redshifts are found to be particularly useful for the identification and study of clusters of galaxies in large surveys. They enable efficient and complete pre-selection of cluster members for spectroscopy, allow accurate determinations of the cluster redshifts, and provide a means of determining cluster membership. (Abridged)
  • We select 25,000 galaxies from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey (NMBS) to study the rest-frame U-V color distribution of galaxies at 0 < z < 2.5. The five unique NIR filters of the NMBS enable the precise measurement of photometric redshifts and rest-frame colors for 9,900 galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5. The rest-frame U-V color distribution at all z<~2.5 is bimodal, with a red peak, a blue peak, and a population of galaxies in between (the green valley). Model fits to the optical-NIR SEDs and the distribution of MIPS-detected galaxies indicate that the colors of galaxies in the green valley are determined largely by the amount of reddening by dust. This result does not support the simplest interpretation of green valley objects as a transition from blue star-forming to red quiescent galaxies. We show that correcting the rest-frame colors for dust reddening allows a remarkably clean separation between the red and blue sequences up to z~2.5. Our study confirms that dusty starburst galaxies can contribute a significant fraction to red sequence samples selected on the basis of a single rest-frame color (i.e. U-V), so extra care must be taken if samples of truly "red and dead" galaxies are desired. Interestingly, of galaxies detected at 24 microns, 14% remain on the red sequence after applying the reddening correction.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of the stellar population properties (age, metallicity and the alpha-element enhancement [E/Fe]) and morphologies of red-sequence galaxies in 24 clusters and groups from z~0.75 to z~0.45. The dataset, consisting of 215 spectra drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey, constitutes the largest spectroscopic sample at these redshifts for which such an analysis has been conducted. Analysis reveals that the evolution of the stellar population properties of red-sequence galaxies depend on their mass: while the properties of most massive are well described by passive evolution and high-redshift formation, the less massive galaxies require a more extended star formation history. We show that these scenarios reproduce the index-sigma relations as well as the galaxy colours. The two main results of this work are (1) the evolution of the line-strength indices for the red-sequence galaxies can be reproduced if 40% of the galaxies with sigma < 175 km/s entered the red-sequence between z=0.75 to z=0.45, in agreement with the fraction derived in studies of the luminosity functions, and (2) the percentage the red-sequence galaxies exhibiting early-type morphologies (E and S0) decreases by 20% from z=0.75 to z=0.45. This can be understood if the red-sequence gets populated at later times with disc galaxies whose star formation has been quenched. We conclude that the processes quenching star formation do not necessarily produce a simultaneous morphological transformation of the galaxies entering the red-sequence.
  • We present HST NICMOS+ACS and Spitzer IRAC+MIPS observations of 41 galaxies at 2<z<3.5 in the FIRES MS1054 field with red and blue rest-frame optical colors. About half of the galaxies are very compact (effective radii r_e < 1 kpc) at rest-frame optical wavelengths, the others are extended (1< r_e < 10 kpc). For reference, 1 kpc corresponds to 0.12 arcsec at z=2.5 in the adopted cosmology. We separate actively star forming galaxies from quiescent galaxies by modeling their rest-frame UV-NIR SEDs. The star forming galaxies span the full range of sizes, while the quiescent galaxies all have r_e<2kpc. In the redshift range where MIPS 24 micron imaging is a sensitive probe of re-radiated dust emission (z<2.5), the 24 micron fluxes confirm that the light of the small quiescent galaxies is dominated by old stars, rather than dust-enshrouded star formation or AGN activity. The inferred surface mass densities and velocity dispersions for the quiescent galaxies are very high compared to those in local galaxies. The galaxies follow a Kormendy relation (between surface brightness and size) with approximately the same slope as locally, but shifted to brighter surface brightnesses, consistent with a mean stellar formation redshift of z_f~5. This paper demonstrates a direct relation between star formation activity and size at z~2.5, and the existence of a significant population of massive, extremely dense, old stellar systems without readily identifiable counterparts in the local universe.
  • We describe Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of 10 of the 20 ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) fields. Each ~40 square arcminute field was imaged in the F814W filter with the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Camera. Based on these data, we present visual morphological classifications for the ~920 sources per field that are brighter than I_auto=23 mag. We use these classifications to quantify the morphological content of 10 intermediate-redshift (0.5 < z < 0.8) galaxy clusters within the HST survey region. The EDisCS results, combined with previously published data from seven higher redshift clusters, show no statistically significant evidence for evolution in the mean fractions of elliptical, S0, and late-type (Sp+Irr) galaxies in clusters over the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.2. In contrast, existing studies of lower redshift clusters have revealed a factor of ~2 increase in the typical S0 fraction between z=0.4 and z=0, accompanied by a commensurate decrease in the Sp+Irr fraction and no evolution in the elliptical fraction. The EDisCS clusters demonstrate that cluster morphological fractions plateau beyond z ~ 0.4. They also exhibit a mild correlation between morphological content and cluster velocity dispersion, highlighting the importance of careful sample selection in evaluating evolution. We discuss these findings in the context of a recently proposed scenario in which the fractions of passive (E,S0) and star-forming (Sp,Irr) galaxies are determined primarily by the growth history of clusters.
  • We present deep, high angular-resolution HST/NICMOS imaging in the Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S), focusing on a subset of 14 Distant Red Galaxies (DRGs) at z ~ 2.5 galaxies that have been pre-selected to have J-K > 2.3. We find a clear trend between the rest-frame optical sizes of these sources and their luminosity-weighted stellar ages as inferred from their broad-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Galaxies whose SEDs are consistent with being dusty and actively star forming generally show extended morphologies in the NICMOS images (r_e >~ 2 kpc), while the 5 sources which are not vigorously forming stars are extremely compact (r_e <~ 1 kpc). This trend suggests a direct link between the mean ages of the stars and the size and density of the galaxies and supports the conjecture that early events quench star-formation and leave compact remnants. Furthermore, the compact galaxies have stellar surface mass densities which exceed those of local galaxies by more than an order of magnitude. The existence of such massive dense galaxies presents a problem for models of early-type galaxy formation and evolution. Larger samples of DRGs and higher spatial resolution imaging will allow us to determine the universality of the results presented here for a small sample.
  • We present XMM-Newton observations of three optically-selected z > 0.6 clusters from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS), comprising the first results of a planned X-ray survey of the full EDisCS high-redshift sample. The EDisCS clusters were identified in the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey as surface brightness fluctuations in the optical sky and their masses and galaxy populations are well described by extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations. We detect two of the three clusters in the X-ray and place a firm upper limit on diffuse emission in the third cluster field. We are able to constrain the X-ray luminosity and temperature of the detected clusters and estimate their masses. We find the X-ray properties of the detected EDisCS clusters are similar to those of X-ray-selected clusters of comparable mass and -- unlike other high-redshift, optically-selected clusters -- are consistent with the T - sigma and L_x - sigma relations determined from X-ray selected clusters at low redshift. The X-ray determined mass estimates are generally consistent with those derived from weak lensing and spectroscopic analyses. These preliminary results suggest that the novel method of optical selection used to construct the EDisCS catalog may, like selection by X-ray luminosity, be well-suited for identification of relaxed, high-redshift clusters whose intracluster medium is in place and stable by z ~ 0.8.
  • Using the deep multi-wavelength MUSYC, GOODS, and FIRES surveys we construct a stellar mass-limited sample of galaxies at 2<z<3. The sample comprises 294 galaxies with M>10^11 Solar masses distributed over four independent fields with a total area of almost 400 sq arcmin. The mean number density of massive galaxies in this redshift range is (2.2+-0.6) x 10^-4 Mpc^-3. We present median values and 25th and 75th percentiles for the distributions of observed R mags, observed J-K colors, and rest-frame UV continuum slopes, M/L(V) ratios, and U-V colors. The galaxies show a large range in all these properties. The ``median galaxy'' is faint in the observer's optical (R=25.9), red in the observed near-IR (J-K=2.48), has a rest-frame UV spectrum which is relatively flat (beta=-0.4), and rest-frame optical colors resembling those of nearby spiral galaxies (U-V=0.62). We determine which galaxies would be selected as Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) or Distant Red Galaxies (DRGs, having J-K>2.3) in this mass-limited sample. By number DRGs make up 69% of the sample and LBGs 20%, with a small amount of overlap. By mass DRGs make up 77% and LBGs 17%. Neither technique provides a representative sample of massive galaxies at 2<z<3 as they only sample the extremes of the population. As we show here, multi-wavelength surveys with high quality photometry are essential for an unbiased census of massive galaxies in the early Universe. The main uncertainty in this analysis is our reliance on photometric redshifts; confirmation of the results presented here requires extensive near-infrared spectroscopy of optically-faint samples.
  • We study how the proportion of star-forming galaxies evolves between z=0.8 and z=0 as a function of galaxy environment, using the [OII] line in emission as a signature of ongoing star formation. Our high-z dataset comprises 16 clusters, 10 groups and another 250 galaxies in poorer groups and the field at z=0.4-0.8 from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey, plus another 9 massive clusters at similar redshifts. As a local comparison, we use samples of galaxy systems selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at 0.04< z < 0.08. At high-z most systems follow a broad anticorrelation between the fraction of star-forming galaxies and the system velocity dispersion. At face value, this suggests that at z=0.4-0.8 the mass of the system largely determines the proportion of galaxies with ongoing star formation. At these redshifts the strength of star formation (as measured by the [OII] equivalent width) in star-forming galaxies is also found to vary systematically with environment. Sloan clusters have much lower fractions of star-forming galaxies than clusters at z=0.4-0.8 and, in contrast with the distant clusters, show a plateau for velocity dispersions $ \ge 550 km s^-1$, where the fraction of galaxies with [OII] emission does not vary systematically with velocity dispersion. We quantify the evolution of the proportion of star-forming galaxies as a function of the system velocity dispersion and find it is strongest in intermediate-mass systems (sigma ~ 500-600 km s^-1 at z=0). To understand the origin of the observed trends, we use the Press-Schechter formalism and the Millennium Simulation and show that galaxy star formation histories may be closely related to the growth history of clusters and groups. We propose a scheme that is able to account for the observed relations between the star-forming fraction and \sigma [abridged].
  • We present weak lensing mass reconstructions for the 20 high-redshift clusters i n the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. The weak lensing analysis was performed on deep, 3-color optical images taken with VLT/FORS2, using a composite galaxy catalog with separate shape estimators measured in each passband. We find that the EDisCS sample is composed primarily of clusters that are less massive than t hose in current X-ray selected samples at similar redshifts, but that all of the fields are likely to contain massive clusters rather than superpositions of low mass groups. We find that 7 of the 20 fields have additional massive structures which are not associated with the clusters and which can affect the weak lensing mass determination. We compare the mass measurements of the remaining 13 clusters with luminosity measurements from cluster galaxies selected using photometric redshifts and find evidence of a dependence of the cluster mass-to-light ratio with redshift. Finally we determine the noise level in the shear measurements for the fields as a function of exposure time and seeing and demonstrate that future ground-based surveys which plan to perform deep optical imaging for use in weak lensing measurements must achieve point-spread functions smaller than a median of 0.6" FWHM.
  • We present deep near-infrared Js, H, and Ks band imaging of a field around MS1054-03, a massive cluster at z=0.83. The observations were carried out with ISAAC at the ESO VLT as part of the Faint InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (FIRES). The total integration time amounts to 25.9h in Js, 24.4h in H, and 26.5h in Ks, divided nearly equally between four pointings covering 5.5'x5.3'. The 3-sigma total limiting AB magnitudes for point sources from the shallowest to deepest pointing are Js=26.0-26.2, H=25.5-25.8, and Ks=25.3-25.7. The effective spatial resolution of the coadded images has FWHM=0.48", 0.46", and 0.52" in Js, H, and Ks. We complemented the ISAAC data with deep optical imaging using existing HST WFPC2 mosaics in the F606W and F814W filters and new U, B and V band data from VLT FORS1. We constructed a Ks-band limited multicolour source catalogue to Ks(total,AB)=25 (about 5-sigma for point sources). The catalogue contains 1858 objects, of which 1663 have eight-band photometry. We describe the observations, data reduction, source detection and photometric measurements method. We present the number counts, colour distributions, and photometric redshifts z_ph of the catalogue sources. We find that our counts at the faint end 22<Ks(AB)<25, with slope dlog(N)/dm=0.20, lie at the flatter end of published counts in other deep fields and are consistent with those we derived in the HDF-South, the other FIRES field. Spectroscopic redshifts z_sp are available for about 330 sources in the MS1054-03 field; comparison between the z_ph and z_sp shows very good agreement, with <|z_sp-z_ph|/(1+z_sp)>=0.078. The MS1054-03 field observations complement our HDF-South data set with nearly five times larger area at about 0.7 brighter magnitudes. [ABRIDGED]
  • We present the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) a survey of 20 fields containing distant galaxy clusters with redshifts ranging from 0.4 to almost 1.0. Candidate clusters were chosen from among the brightest objects identified in the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey, half with estimated redshift z_est~0.5 and half with z_est~0.8. They were confirmed by identifying red sequences in moderately deep two colour data from VLT/FORS2. For confirmed candidates we have assembled deep three-band optical photometry using VLT/FORS2, deep near-infrared photometry in one or two bands using NTT/SOFI, deep optical spectroscopy using VLT/FORS2, wide field imaging in two or three bands using the ESO Wide Field Imager, and HST/ACS mosaic images for 10 of the most distant clusters. This first paper presents our sample and the VLT photometry we have obtained. We present images, colour-magnitude diagrams and richness estimates for our clusters, as well as giving redshifts and positions for the brightest cluster members. Subsequent papers will present our infrared photometry, spectroscopy, HST and wide-field imaging, as well as a wealth of further analysis and science results. Our reduced data become publicly available as these papers are accepted.
  • We investigate the nature of the substantial population of high-z galaxies with Js-Ks>2.3 discovered as part of our FIRES survey. This colour cut efficiently isolates z>2 galaxies with red rest-frame optical colors ("Distant Red Galaxies" or DRGs). We select objects in the 2.5'x2.5' HDF-South (HDF-S) and 5'x5' field around the MS1054-03 cluster; the surface densities at Ks<21 are 1.6+-0.6 and 1.0+-0.2 arcmin^-2. We discuss the 34 DRGs at 2<z<3.5: 11 at Ks<22.5 in HDF-S and 23 at Ks<21.7 in the MS1054-03 field. We analyze the SEDs constructed from our deep near-infrared (NIR) and optical imaging from the ESO VLT and HST. We develop diagnostics involving I-Js, Js-H, and H-Ks to argue that the red NIR colors of DRGs cannot be attributed solely to extinction and require for many an evolved stellar population with prominent Balmer/4000A break. In the rest-frame, the optical colours of DRGs fall within the envelope of normal nearby galaxies and the UV colours suggest a wide range in star formation activity and/or extinction. This contrasts with the much bluer and more uniform SEDs of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). From evolutionary synthesis models with constant star formation, solar metallicity, Salpeter IMF, and Calzetti et al. extinction law, we derive for the HDF-S (MS1054-03 field) DRGs median ages of 1.7(2.0) Gyr, A_V = 2.7(2.4) mag, stellar masses 0.8(1.6)x10^11 Msun, M/L_V = 1.2(2.3) Msun/LVsun, and SFR = 120(170) Msun/yr. Models assuming declining SFRs with e-folding timescales of 10Myr-1Gyr generally imply younger ages, lower A_V's and SFRs, but similar stellar masses within a factor of two. Compared to LBGs at similar redshifts and rest-frame L_V's, DRGs are older, more massive, and more obscured for any given star formation history. [ABRIDGED]
  • We analyse the rest-frame (U-V) colour-magnitude relation for 2 clusters at redshift 0.7 and 0.8, drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. By comparing with the population of red galaxies in the Coma cluster, we show that the high redshift clusters exhibit a deficit of passive faint red galaxies. Our results show that the red-sequence population cannot be explained in terms of a monolithic and synchronous formation scenario. A large fraction of faint passive galaxies in clusters today has moved onto the red sequence relatively recently as a consequence of the fact that their star formation activity has come to an end at z<0.8.
  • The proposed infrared space interferometry mission Darwin has two main aims: (i) to detect and characterize exo-planets similar to the Earth, and (ii) to carry out astrophysical imaging in the wavelength range 6 - 20 micron at a sensitivity similar to JWST, but at an angular resolution up to 100 times higher. In this contribution we will first briefly discuss the imaging performance of the Darwin mission. We will then discuss how Darwin will contribute in a very significant way to our understanding of the formation and evolution of planets, stars, galaxies, and super-massive black-holes located at the centers of galaxies.
  • Using deep near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Deep Field South with ISAAC on the Very Large Telescope we find 6 large disk-like galaxies at redshifts z = 1.4-3.0. The galaxies, selected in K_s (2.2 micron), are regular and surprisingly large in the near-infrared (rest-frame optical), with face-on effective radii r_e = 0.65"-0.9" or 5.0-7.5 h_70^-1 kpc in a Lambda-CDM cosmology, comparable to the Milky Way. The surface brightness profiles are consistent with an exponential law over 2-3 effective radii. The WFPC2 morphologies in Hubble Space Telescope imaging (rest-frame UV) are irregular and show complex aggregates of star-forming regions ~2" (~15 h_70^-1 kpc) across, symmetrically distributed around the K_s-band centers. The spectral energy distributions show clear breaks in the rest-frame optical. The breaks are strongest in the central regions of the galaxies, and can be identified as the age-sensitive Balmer/4000 Angstrom break. The most straightforward interpretation is that these galaxies are large disk galaxies; deep NIR data are indispensable for this classification. The candidate disks constitute 50% of galaxies with L_V > 6 x 10^10 h_70^-2 L_sun at z = 1.4-3.0. This discovery was not expected on the basis of previously studied samples. In particular, the Hubble Deep Field North is deficient in large galaxies with the morphologies and profiles we report here.
  • The clustering properties of faint K<24 galaxies are measured in ultradeep J, H and K near-IR images of the Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S), obtained with ISAAC at the VLT. A relatively large clustering amplitude is found up to K=24, at a level comparable to the measurements at K~19. The redshift distribution of K<24 galaxies extends to z_phot~4-5, and ~40% of the galaxies are at z_phot>2.At the highest redshifts, 2<z_phot<4, galaxies selected in the rest frame optical (K-band) appear more clustered than those selected in the rest frame UV (i.e. Lyman Break Galaxies, LBGs). Galaxy clustering depends on the J-K color at 2<z_phot<4. K-selected galaxies with J-K>1.7 reach r_0~8 h^-1 Mpc comoving. This is a factor of 3--4 higher than the correlation length of LBGs with similar number densities, down to V_606<27, and is also larger than the correlation length of galaxies with blue J-K<1.7 colors. Hence at z about 3 a color-density relation is observed which is similar to that observed locally. Fluctuations in the amplitude of clustering due to cosmic variance may affect our estimates derived from the small HDF-S field, but these are unlikely to change our main conclusions. The galaxies with red J-K>1.7 colors at 2<z_phot<4 are likely older and more massive galaxies, on average, than LBGs. They were presumably formed in the highest density perturbations at early epochs. Semi-analytical hierarchical models do predict the existence of strongly clustered populations at z~3, but with at least a factor of 10 lower number density than the one measured. The overall properties of this strongly clustered population consistently suggest that they are the progenitors, or building blocks, of local massive early-type galaxies and z~1 EROs, close to their major epochs of formation.