• Although experimental efforts have been active for about 30 years now, a direct laboratory observation of vacuum magnetic birefringence, an effect due to vacuum fluctuations, still needs confirmation. Indeed, the predicted birefringence of vacuum is $\Delta n = 4.0\times 10^{-24}$ @ 1~T. One of the key ingredients when designing a polarimeter capable of detecting such a small birefringence is a long optical path length within the magnetic field and a time dependent effect. To lengthen the optical path within the magnetic field a Fabry-Perot optical cavity is generally used with a finesse ranging from ${\cal F} \approx 10^4$ to ${\cal F} \approx7\times 10^5$. Interestingly, there is a difficulty in reaching the predicted shot noise limit of such polarimeters. We have measured the ellipticity and rotation noises along with a Cotton-Mouton and a Faraday effect as a function of the finesse of the cavity of the PVLAS polarimeter. The observations are consistent with the idea that the cavity mirrors generate a birefringence-dominated noise whose ellipticity is amplified by the cavity itself. The optical path difference sensitivity at $10\;$Hz is $S_{\Delta{\cal D}}=6\times 10^{-19}\;$m$/\sqrt{\rm Hz}$, a value which we believe is consistent with an intrinsic thermal noise in the mirror coatings.
  • This note presents a method to tune the resonant frequency $f_{0}$ of a rectangular microwave cavity. This is achieved using a liquid metal, GaInSn, to decrease the volume of the cavity. It is possible to shift $f_{0}$ by filling the cavity with this alloy, in order to reduce the relative distance between the internal walls. The resulting modes have resonant frequencies in the range $7\div8\,$GHz. The capability of the system of producing an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurement has been tested by placing a 1 mm diameter Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) sphere inside the cavity, and producing a strong coupling between the cavity resonance and Kittel mode. This work shows the possibility to tune a resonant system in the GHz range, which can be useful for several applications.
  • The current status of the QUAX R\&D program is presented. QUAX is a feasibility study for a detection of axion as dark matter based on the coupling to the electrons. The relevant signal is a magnetization change of a magnetic material placed inside a resonant microwave cavity and polarized with a static magnetic field.
  • We present a more stringent upper limit on long-range axion-mediated forces obtained by the QUAX-g$_p$g$_s$ experiment, located at the INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. We investigate the possible coupling between the electron spins of a paramagnetic GSO crystal and unpolarized nucleons of lead disks by measuring variations of GSO magnetization with a dc-SQUID magnetometer. Such an induced magnetization can be interpreted as the effect of a long-range spin dependent interaction mediated by axions or Axion Like Particles (ALPs). The corresponding coupling strength is proportional to the CP violating term $g_p^eg_s^N$, i.e. the product of the pseudoscalar and scalar coupling constants of electron and nucleon, respectively. Previous upper limits are improved by one order of magnitude, namely $g_p^eg_s^N/(\hbar c) \le 4.3\times10^{-30}$ at 95% confidence level, in the interaction range $10^{-3}$ m $<\lambda_a<0.2$ m. We eventually discuss our plans to improve the QUAX-g$_p$g$_s$ sensitivity by a few orders of magnitude, which will allow us to investigate the $\vartheta\simeq 10^{-10}$ range of CP-violating parameter and test some QCD axion models.
  • We present a detection scheme to search for QCD axion dark matter, that is based on a direct interaction between axions and electrons explicitly predicted by DFSZ axion models. The local axion dark matter field shall drive transitions between Zeeman-split atomic levels separated by the axion rest mass energy $m_a c^2$. Axion-related excitations are then detected with an upconversion scheme involving a pump laser that converts the absorbed axion energy ($\sim $ hundreds of $\mu$eV) to visible or infrared photons, where single photon detection is an established technique. The proposed scheme involves rare-earth ions doped into solid-state crystalline materials, and the optical transitions take place between energy levels of $4f^N$ electron configuration. Beyond discussing theoretical aspects and requirements to achieve a cosmologically relevant sensitivity, especially in terms of spectroscopic material properties, we experimentally investigate backgrounds due to the pump laser at temperatures in the range $1.9-4.2$ K. Our results rule out excitation of the upper Zeeman component of the ground state by laser-related heating effects, and are of some help in optimizing activated material parameters to suppress the multiphonon-assisted Stokes fluorescence.
  • We present a proposal to search for QCD axions with mass in the 200 $\mu$eV range, assuming that they make a dominant component of dark matter. Due to the axion-electron spin coupling, their effect is equivalent to the application of an oscillating rf field with frequency and amplitude fixed by the axion mass and coupling respectively. This equivalent magnetic field would produce spin flips in a magnetic sample placed inside a static magnetic field, which determines the resonant interaction at the Larmor frequency. Spin flips would subsequently emit radio frequency photons that can be detected by a suitable quantum counter in an ultra-cryogenic environment. This new detection technique is crucial to keep under control the thermal photon background which would otherwise produce a too large noise.
  • We demonstrate an all-optical method for manipulating the magnetization in a 1-mm YIG (yttrium-iron-garnet) sphere placed in a $\sim0.17\,$T uniform magnetic field. An harmonic of the frequency comb delivered by a multi-GHz infrared laser source is tuned to the Larmor frequency of the YIG sphere to drive magnetization oscillations, which in turn give rise to a radiation field used to thoroughly investigate the phenomenon. The radiation damping issue that occurs at high frequency and in the presence of highly magnetizated materials, has been overcome by exploiting magnon-photon strong coupling regime in microwave cavities. Our findings demonstrate an effective technique for ultrafast control of the magnetization vector in optomagnetic materials via polarization rotation and intensity modulation of an incident laser beam. We eventually get a second-order susceptibility value of $\sim10^{-7}$ cm$^2$/MW for single crystal YIG.
  • A novel polarisation modulation scheme for polarimeters based on Fabry-Perot cavities is presented. The application to the proposed HERA-X experiment aiming to measuring the magnetic birefringence of vacuum with the HERA superconducting magnets is discussed.
  • Vacuum magnetic birefringence was predicted long time ago and is still lacking a direct experimental confirmation. Several experimental efforts are striving to reach this goal, and the sequence of results promises a success in the next few years. This measurement generally is accompanied by the search for hypothetical light particles that couple to two photons. The PVLAS experiment employs a sensitive polarimeter based on a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. In this paper we report on the latest experimental results of this experiment. The data are analysed taking into account the intrinsic birefringence of the dielectric mirrors of the cavity. Besides the limit on the vacuum magnetic birefringence, the measurements also allow the model-independent exclusion of new regions in the parameter space of axion-like and milli-charged particles. In particular, these last limits hold also for all types of neutrinos, resulting in a laboratory limit on their charge.
  • We report about a novel scheme for particle detection based on the infrared quantum counter concept. Its operation consists of a two-step excitation process of a four level system, that can be realized in rare earth-doped crystals when a cw pump laser is tuned to the transition from the second to the fourth level. The incident particle raises the atoms of the active material into a low lying, metastable energy state, triggering the absorption of the pump laser to a higher level. Following a rapid non-radiative decay to a fluorescent level, an optical signal is observed with a conventional detectors. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a scheme, we have investigated the emission from the fluorescent level $^4$S$_{3/2}$ (540 nm band) in an Er$^{3+}$-doped YAG crystal pumped by a tunable titanium sapphire laser when it is irradiated with 60 keV electrons delivered by an electron gun. We have obtained a clear signature this excitation increases the $^{4}I_{13/2}$ metastable level population that can efficiently be exploited to generate a detectable optical signal.
  • During 2014 the PVLAS experiment has started data taking with a new apparatus installed at the INFN Section of Ferrara, Italy. The main target of the experiment is the observation of magnetic birefringence of vacuum. According to QED, the ellipticity generated by the magnetic birefringence of vacuum in the experimental apparatus is expected to be $\psi^{\rm(QED)} \approx 5\times10^{-11}$. No ellipticity signal is present so far with a noise floor $\psi^{\rm(noise)} \approx 2.5\times10^{-9}$ after 210 hours of data taking. The resulting ellipticity limit provides the best model independent upper limit on the coupling of axions to $\gamma\gamma$ for axion masses above $10^{-3}$eV.
  • Several groups are carrying out experiments to observe and measure vacuum magnetic birefringence, predicted by Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). We have started running the new PVLAS apparatus installed in Ferrara, Italy, and have measured a noise floor value for the unitary field magnetic birefringence of vacuum $\Delta n_u^{\rm (vac)}= (4\pm 20) \times 10^{-23}$ T$^{-2}$ (the error represents a 1$\sigma$ deviation). This measurement is compatible with zero and hence represents a new limit on vacuum magnetic birefringence deriving from non linear electrodynamics. This result reduces to a factor 50 the gap to be overcome to measure for the first time the value of $\Delta n_u^{\rm (vac,QED)}$ predicted by QED: $\Delta n_u^{\rm (vac,QED)}= 4\times 10^{-24}$ ~T$^{-2}$. These birefringence measurements also yield improved model-independent bounds on the coupling constant of axion-like particles to two photons, for masses greater than 1 meV, along with a factor two improvement of the fractional charge limit on millicharged particles (fermions and scalars), including neutrinos.
  • In this paper we report on a measurement of the Cotton Mouton effect of water vapour. Measurement performed at room temperature ($T=301$ K) with a wavelength of 1064 nm gave the value $\Delta n_u = (6.67 \pm 0.45) \cdot 10^{-15}$ for the unit magnetic birefringence (1 T magnetic field and atmospheric pressure).
  • The PVLAS collaboration is presently assembling a new apparatus (at the INFN section of Ferrara, Italy) to detect vacuum magnetic birefringence (VMB). VMB is related to the structure of the QED vacuum and is predicted by the Euler-Heisenberg-Weisskopf effective Lagrangian. It can be detected by measuring the ellipticity acquired by a linearly polarised light beam propagating through a strong magnetic field. Using the very same optical technique it is also possible to search for hypothetical low-mass particles interacting with two photons, such as axion-like (ALP) or millicharged particles (MCP). Here we report results of a scaled-down test setup and describe the new PVLAS apparatus. This latter one is in construction and is based on a high-sensitivity ellipsometer with a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity ($>4\times 10^5$) and two 0.8 m long 2.5 T rotating permanent dipole magnets. Measurements with the test setup have improved by a factor 2 the previous upper bound on the parameter $A_e$, which determines the strength of the nonlinear terms in the QED Lagrangian: $A_e^{\rm (PVLAS)} < 3.3 \times 10^{-21}$ T$^{-2}$ 95% c.l. Furthermore, new laboratory limits have been put on the inverse coupling constant of ALPs to two photons and confirmation of previous limits on the fractional charge of millicharged particles is given.
  • Although quantum mechanics (QM) and quantum field theory (QFT) are highly successful, the seemingly simplest state -- vacuum -- remains mysterious. While the LHC experiments are expected to clarify basic questions on the structure of QFT vacuum, much can still be done at lower energies as well. For instance, experiments like PVLAS try to reach extremely high sensitivities, in their attempt to observe the effects of the interaction of visible or near-visible photons with intense magnetic fields -- a process which becomes possible in quantum electrodynamics (QED) thanks to the vacuum fluctuations of the electronic field, and which is akin to photon-photon scattering. PVLAS is now close to data-taking and if it reaches the required sensitivity, it could provide important information on QED vacuum. PVLAS and other similar experiments face great challenges as they try to measure an extremely minute effect. However, raising the photon energy greatly increases the photon-photon cross-section, and gamma rays could help extract much more information from the observed light-light scattering. Here we discuss an experimental design to measure photon-photon scattering close to the peak of the photon-photon cross-section, that could fit in the proposed construction of an FEL facility at the Cabibbo Lab near Frascati (Rome, Italy).
  • New measurements to test the neutrality of matter by acoustic means are reported. The apparatus is based on a spherical capacitor filled with gaseous SF$_6$ excited by an oscillating electric field. The apparatus has been calibrated measuring the electric polarizability. Assuming charge conservation in the $\beta$ decay of the neutron, the experiment gives a limit of $\epsilon_\text{p-e}\lesssim1\cdot10^{-21}$ for the electron-proton charge difference, the same limit holding for the charge of the neutron. Previous measurements are critically reviewed and found incorrect: the present result is the best limit obtained with this technique.
  • Nonlinear effects in vacuum have been predicted but never observed yet directly. The PVLAS collaboration has long been working on an apparatus aimed at detecting such effects by measuring vacuum magnetic birefringence. Unfortunately the sensitivity has been affected by unaccounted noise and systematics since the beginning. A new small prototype ellipsometer has been designed and characterized at the Department of Physics of the University of Ferrara, Italy entirely mounted on a single seismically isolated optical bench. With a finesse F = 414000 and a cavity length L = 0.5 m we have reached the predicted sensitivity of psi = 2x10^-8 1/sqrt(Hz) given the laser power at the output of the ellipsomenter of P = 24 mW. This record result demonstrates the feasibility of reaching such sensitivities and opens the way to designing a dedicated apparatus for a first detection of vacuum magnetic birefringence.
  • Experimental bounds on induced vacuum magnetic birefringence can be used to improve present photon-photon scattering limits in the electronvolt energy range. Measurements with the PVLAS apparatus (E. Zavattini {\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. D {\bf77} (2008) 032006) at both $\lambda = 1064$ nm and 532 nm lead to bounds on the parameter {\it A$_{e}$}, describing non linear effects in QED, of $A_{e}^{(1064)} < 6.6\cdot10^{-21}$ T$^{-2}$ @ 1064 nm and $A_{e}^{(532)} < 6.3\cdot10^{-21}$ T$^{-2}$ @ 532 nm, respectively, at 95% confidence level, compared to the predicted value of $A_{e}=1.32\cdot10^{-24}$ T$^{-2}$. The total photon-photon scattering cross section may also be expressed in terms of $A_e$, setting bounds for unpolarized light of $\sigma_{\gamma\gamma}^{(1064)} < 4.6\cdot10^{-62}$ m$^{2}$ and $\sigma_{\gamma\gamma}^{(532)} < 2.7\cdot10^{-60}$ m$^{2}$. Compared to the expected QED scattering cross section these results are a factor of $\simeq2\cdot10^{7}$ higher and represent an improvement of a factor about 500 on previous bounds based on ellipticity measurements and of a factor of about $10^{10}$ on bounds based on direct stimulated scattering measurements.
  • IIn 2006 the PVLAS collaboration reported the observation of an optical rotation generated in vacuum by a magnetic field. To further check against possible instrumental artifacts several upgrades to the PVLAS apparatus have been made during the last year. Two data taking runs, at the wavelength of 1064 nm, have been performed in the new configuration with magnetic field strengths of 2.3 T and 5 T. The 2.3 T field value was chosen in order to avoid stray fields. The new observations do not show the presence of a rotation signal down to the levels of $1.2\cdot 10^{-8}$ rad at 5 T and $1.0\cdot 10^{-8}$ rad at 2.3 T (at 95% c.l.) with 45000 passes in the magnetic field zone. In the same conditions no ellipticity signal was detected down to $1.4\cdot 10^{-8}$ at 2.3 T (at 95% c.l.), whereas at 5 T a signal is still present. The physical nature of this ellipticity as due to an effect depending on $B^2$ can be excluded by the measurement at 2.3 T. These new results completely exclude the previously published magnetically induced vacuum dichroism results, indicating that they were instrumental artifacts. These new results therefore also exclude the particle interpretation of the previous PVLAS results as due to a spin zero boson. The background ellipticity at 2.3 T can be used to determine a new limit on the total photon-photon scattering cross section of $\sigma_{\gamma\gamma} < 4.5 \cdot10^{-34}$ barn at 95% c.l..
  • We report the experimental observation of a light polarization rotation in vacuum in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. Assuming that data distribution is Gaussian, the average measured rotation is (3.9+/-0.5)e-12 rad/pass, at 5 T with 44000 passes through a 1m long magnet, with lambda = 1064 nm. The relevance of this result in terms of the existence of a light, neutral, spin-zero particle is discussed.
  • Nonlinear interactions of light with light are well known in quantum electronics, and it is quite common to generate harmonic or subharmonic beams from a primary laser with photonic crystals. One suprising result of quantum electrodynamics is that because of the quantum fluctuations of charged fields, the same can happen in vacuum. The virtual charged particle pairs can be polarized by an external field and vacuum can thus become birefringent: the PVLAS experiment was originally meant to explore this strange quantum regime with optical methods. Since its inception PVLAS has found a new, additional goal: in fact vacuum can become a dichroic medium if we assume that it is filled with light neutral particles that couple to two photons, and thus PVLAS can search for exotic particles as well. PVLAS implements a complex signal processing scheme: here we describe the double data acquisition chain and the data analysis methods used to process the experimental data.
  • The Casimir effect is a well-known macroscopic consequence of quantum vacuum fluctuations, but whereas the static effect (Casimir force) has long been observed experimentally, the dynamic Casimir effect is up to now undetected. From an experimental viewpoint a possible detection would imply the vibration of a mirror at gigahertz frequencies. Mechanical motions at such frequencies turn out to be technically unfeasible. Here we present a different experimental scheme where mechanical motions are avoided, and the results of laboratory tests showing that the scheme is practically feasible. We think that at present this approach gives the only possibility of detecting this phenomenon.
  • We report on the measurement of the Casimir force between conducting surfaces in a parallel configuration. The force is exerted between a silicon cantilever coated with chromium and a similar rigid surface and is detected looking at the shifts induced in the cantilever frequency when the latter is approached. The scaling of the force with the distance between the surfaces was tested in the 0.5 - 3.0 $\mu$m range, and the related force coefficient was determined at the 15% precision level.
  • We report on the frequency locking of a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser to a 45 000 finesse, 87-cm-long, Fabry-Perot cavity using a modified form of the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. Necessary signals, such as light phase modulation and frequency correction feedback, are fed direcly to the infrared pump laser. This is sufficient to achieve a stable locking of the 532 nm visible beam to the cavity, also showing that the doubling process does not degrade laser performances.
  • The PVLAS collaboration is at present running, at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro of I.N.F.N., Padova, Italy, a very sensitive optical ellipsometer capable of measuring the small rotations or ellipticities which can be acquired by a linearly polarized laser beam propagating in vacuum through a transverse magnetic feld (vacuum magnetic birefringence). The apparatus will also be able to set new limits on mass and coupling constant of light scalar/pseudoscalar particles coupling to two photons by both producing and detecting the hypothetical particles. The axion, introduced to explain parity conservation in strong interactions, is an example of this class of particles, all of which are considered possible dark matter candidates. The PVLAS apparatus consists of a very high finesse (> 140000), 6.4 m long, Fabry-Perot cavity immersed in an intense dipolar magnetic field (~6.5 T). A linearly polarized laser beam is frequency locked to the cavity and analysed, using a heterodyne technique, for rotation and/or ellipticity acquired within the magnetic field.